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EETT: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's)

Enhancing Education Through Technology (EETT) Formula and Competitive Grant questions pertaining to application, eligibility, technology plans, and private schools.

Application and Eligibility

  1. Is the Enhancing Education Through Technology (EETT) Formula Grant a school-based or local educational agency (LEA)-based grant?

    Answer: Both the EETT Formula and Competitive Grants are LEA-based grants established to assist LEAs in improving student academic achievement through the use of technology. The Competitive grant targets eligible districts that serve grades 4-8; there is no grade restriction on the Formula grant. At least 25 percent of the funds for both types of grants must be used to provide ongoing, sustained, and intensive, high-quality professional development in the integration of advanced technologies, including emerging technologies, into curricula and instruction and in using those technologies to create new learning environments.

  2. Can our LEA apply for both the formula and competitive grants?

    Answer: Yes. Eligible applicants may apply for both formula and competitive grants.

  3. Are charter schools eligible for EETT funding?

    Answer: Yes, but only direct-funded charter schools may apply directly for EETT funding. Charter schools must also have an approved three to five year education technology plan as a precondition for funding. Locally funded charter schools are included in their funding-district's application and cannot apply directly for EETT funding.

  4. Will LEAs approved and granted funds in one year need to re-apply in subsequent years?

    Answer: If an LEA is awarded EETT-Formula funding in one year and remains eligible for funding the next year, the LEA will only need to sign and return the Grant Award (AO-400) to the CDE. EETT Competitive grants are multi-year awards, but require additional program documentation at the end of each grant award period.

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Education Technology Plans

  1. What are the certification requirements for LEA technology plans under EETT?

    Answer: LEA education technology plans must meet EETT education technology plan requirements before an LEA can receive funding. LEAs that have education technology plans that have passed state-level review for compliance with the State Board approved guidelines need only address two additional EETT criteria in order to meet the education technology plan requirements for the EETT grant programs. LEAs with only local governing board certification and/or E-rate certification must submit their plans for state-level review in order to be considered for funding.

  2. Is a technology plan required to receive technology-related funding?

    Answer:
    Yes. A county office of education, school district, or direct-funded charter school must have an approved education technology plan in order to receive education technology funds administered by the California Department of Education (CDE). (Education Code Section 51871.5.)

  3. Our LEA is a member of a consortium, but not the lead LEA. Must we have an approved education technology plan?

    Answer: Yes. Whether applying as individual applicants or as members of a consortium, all LEAs must have an education technology plan approved by the CDE. Note- if a consortium member does not have an approved education technology plan, the entire consortium will not be funded until that LEA has a CDE approved technology plan.

  4. Our LEA education technology plan was reviewed and approved by the CDE, but we have subsequently revised that plan. Does the entire plan have to be reviewed again for EETT funding approval?

    Answer: No, if the technology plan was changed with only minor revisions and all the plan components are still addressed, then the technology plan does not have to be resubmitted for review. However, if the revisions are significant, then the plan must be re-submitted to the CDE for review and approval. The LEA must identify the changes and where they are located in the plan.

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Formula Funds

  1. How do I qualify for EETT Title II, Part D formula funding?

    Answer: To be eligible to receive EETT Title II, Part D formula funding, you will need an approved technology plan and receive Title I Part A funding. Grant award documents (Form AO-400) are automatically sent annually to the LEA’s superintendent.

  2. How much will my LEA receive under the formula funding?

    Answer: Funds will be distributed only to LEAs that receive funds under Part A of Title I or to other LEAs that apply as part of a consortium with districts that receive funds under Part A of Title I. The amount of funding an LEA receives is based on its proportionate share of funds to total funds under Part A of Title I.

  3. How can consortium members that do not receive Title I, Part A be funded?

    Answer: Members of consortia will share the resources of the qualified LEA. For example LEA 1 (the qualified school LEA) will share its professional development activities with LEA 2 (the non-qualified school LEA). The shared resources will support both LEAs education technology plans.

  4. What can funds be spent on and what is the final date to spend and/or obligate EETT formula funds?

    Answer: per Sec. 2416 (a) and (b), LEAs can spend EETT funds on:
    (a) PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT–

    (1) IN GENERAL– A recipient of funds made available under section 2412 (a) (2) shall use not less than 25 percent of such funds to provide ongoing, sustained, and intensive, high-quality professional development. The recipient shall provide professional development in the integration of advanced technologies, including emerging technologies, into curricula and instruction and in using those technologies to create new learning environments, such as professional development in the use of technology—

    (A) to access data and resources to develop curricula and instructional materials;

    (B) to enable teachers—

    (i) to use the Internet and other technology to communicate with parents, other teachers, principals, and administrators; and

    (ii) to retrieve Internet-based learning resources; and

    (C) to lead to improvements in classroom instruction in the core academic subjects, that effectively prepare students to meet challenging State academic content standards, including increasing student technology literacy, and student academic achievement standards.

    (2) WAIVERS- Paragraph (1) shall not apply to a recipient of funds made available under section 2412 (a) (2) that demonstrates, to the satisfaction of the State educational agency involved, that the recipient already provides ongoing, sustained, and intensive, high-quality professional development that is based on a review of relevant research, to all teachers in core academic subjects in the integration of advanced technologies, including emerging technologies, into curricula and instruction.

    (b) OTHER ACTIVITIES- In addition to the activities described in subsection (a), a recipient of funds made available by a State educational agency under section 2412 (a) (2) shall use such funds to carry out other activities consistent with this subpart, which may include the following:

    (1) Establishing or expanding initiatives, particularly initiatives involving public-private partnerships, designed to increase access to technology for students and teachers, with special emphasis on the access of high-need schools to technology.

    (2) Adapting or expanding existing and new applications of technology to enable teachers to increase student academic achievement, including technology literacy—

    (A) through the use of teaching practices that are based on a review of relevant research and are designed to prepare students to meet challenging State academic content and student academic achievement standards; and

    (B) by the development and utilization of innovative distance learning strategies to deliver specialized or rigorous academic courses and curricula to areas that would not otherwise have access to such courses and curricula.

    (3) Acquiring proven and effective courses and curricula that include integrated technology and are designed to help students meet challenging State academic content and student academic achievement standards.

    (4) Utilizing technology to develop or expand efforts to connect schools and teachers with parents and students to promote meaningful parental involvement, to foster increased communication about curricula, assignments, and assessments between students, parents, and teachers, and to assist parents to understand the technology being applied in their child's education, so that parents are able to reinforce at home the instruction their child receives at school.

    (5) Preparing one or more teachers in elementary schools and secondary schools as technology leaders who are provided with the means to serve as experts and train other teachers in the effective use of technology, and providing bonus payments to the technology leaders.

    (6) Acquiring, adapting, expanding, implementing, repairing, and maintaining existing and new applications of technology, to support the school reform effort and to improve student academic achievement, including technology literacy.

    (7) Acquiring connectivity linkages, resources, and services (including the acquisition of hardware and software and other electronically delivered learning materials) for use by teachers, students, academic counselors, and school library media personnel in the classroom, in academic and college counseling centers, or in school library media centers, in order to improve student academic achievement.

    (8) Using technology to collect, manage, and analyze data to inform and enhance teaching and school improvement efforts.

    (9) Implementing performance measurement systems to determine the effectiveness of education technology programs funded under this subpart, particularly in determining the extent to which activities funded under this subpart are effective in integrating technology into curricula and instruction, increasing the ability of teachers to teach, and enabling students to meet challenging State academic content and student academic achievement standards.

    (10) Developing, enhancing, or implementing information technology courses

    The EETT program is governed by the availability provisions in the “Tydings Amendment” which allows the LEA an extra year to obligate federal funds. Any funds that are not obligated at the end of the federal funding period (15 month period from July 1st through September 30th) shall remain available for obligation for an additional period of 12 months. For example, a grant award with a federal funding period of July 1, 2009, to September 30, 2010, will have an additional 12 months (or until September 30, 2011) to obligate any funds that have not been obligated within the federal funding period. The End-Of-Period Grant Expenditure Report can be filed with the CDE as soon as the grant award has been fully expended, or obligated.

  5. When will the LEAs receive EETT Formula funds?

    Answer: EETT formula grants are funded on a reimbursement basis. EETT formula funds will be disbursed upon the filing of a completed EOP, which can be filed once the grant award funds have been fully expended or obligated.

  6. How do I obtain the EETT Formula End of Period Expenditure Report Forms?

    Answer: An EETT Formula EOP report is mailed with the original award notification (Form AO-400). Copies of the EOP are subsequently posted on our listserv.

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Competitive Funds

  1. Which districts are eligible to apply for the Enhancing Education Through Technology (EETT) Competitive grant?

    Answer: Eligibility is restricted to school districts (or a consortium of school districts), county offices of education, and direct-funded charter schools, that serve students in grades four through eight and meet the following criteria:

    Those that are among the school districts in the state with the highest number or percentage of children from families with an income below the poverty line established by the federal Director of the Office of Management and Budget and meet either of the additional criteria:

    They operate one or more schools identified for improvement or corrective action under Section 1116 of the federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-110 );

    OR

    They have a substantial need for assistance in acquiring and using technology, defined as having an average of 10:1 student-to-multimedia computer ratio or greater in schools serving grades 4-8 in the district or an average of less than 50 percent of classrooms connected to the Internet in schools serving grades 4-8 in the district as determined by the California School Technology Survey for the year prior to the grant award.

  2. What is meant by "highest percentage of families in poverty?"

    Answer: For purposes of this program, the term "poverty line" means the poverty line (as defined by the Office of Management and Budget and revised annually in accordance with Section 673(2) of the Community Services Block Grant Act) applicable to a family of the size involved (ESEA Section 9101(33)). (See the U.S. Census Web site. External link opens in new window or tab. ) For purposes of this program, eligible districts are those within the top third based upon the percentage of students in poverty or the number of students in poverty according to census data.

  3. May eligible school districts apply for both formula and competitive EETT grants?

    Answer: Yes. Eligible districts may apply for both grants. Applications from an LEA that received less than $6,000 in formula grant funding will be given funding priority for the competitive grant.

  4. Is this a district or a site-based application? Do the grant award funds have to be divided equally among all the eligible sites in the application?

    Answer: The EETT Competitive grant is a district grant that funds individual eligible sites. The grant award does not have to be divided equally among all the eligible sites in the application. The district sets the priorities for funding the sites in the application.

  5. How will grant awards be determined if application is made on behalf of a consortium?

    Answer: Grant awards will be based on the total allocation for all eligible school districts within the consortium. Grants will be awarded to the lead school district on behalf of all eligible school districts applying within the consortium.

  6. Can my district apply as both a single district and part of a consortium?

    Answer: No. Eligible districts may be part of only one application, either a single district application or as part of a consortium application.

  7. How does the district know which private schools(s) should be included as part of the equitable participation requirement of the grant?

    Answer: For purposes of this grant, private schools must be located within the service area of the district and serve students in grades four through eight. Eligible private schools are usually identified on the Consolidated Application.

  8. Can private schools benefit from these funds?

    Answer: Services and goods are shared with a qualified private school or schools. No funds can be directly given to private schools. The goods and/or services that are shared with private schools are agreed upon through a consultation between the private school(s) and the local educational agency (LEA). The LEA receives no extra funds for private schools.

  9. What is meant by a partnership, as referenced in the application?

    Answer: A partnership is an alliance that involves the school district and at least one of the following:

    • A LEA that can demonstrate that teachers in its schools are effectively integrating technology and proven teaching strategies into instruction, based on a review of relevant research, and that the integration results in improvement in classroom instruction and in helping students meet challenging academic standards.
    • An institution of higher education that is in full compliance with the teacher quality reporting requirements of Section 207(f) of the Higher Education Act of 1965, and that has not been identified by the state as low performing under that act. For more information about this requirement see the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, Title II, Section 207(f).
    • A for-profit business or organization that develops, designs, manufacturers, or produces technology products or services or has substantial expertise in the application of technology in instruction.
    • A public or private nonprofit organization with demonstrated expertise in the application of educational technology in instruction.

      It is important to note that the partnership relationship should be mutually beneficial. The strength of the partnership relationship will have a bearing on the scoring of the application.

  10. How will the reviewers know if the partnership has been established and if the partner was involved in the application development?

    Answer: The application must contain a completed EETT Form 9, Consortium, and/or Partnership Applicants, listing all consortium members and partners. A one-page partnership letter should support any partnerships listed on this form. Partnership letters should be written on the partner's letterhead, summarize how the partnership supports the comprehensive program and is mutually beneficial to the partner and the LEA. The letter must be signed by the lead contact for each partnership.

  11. If the district has many partners, must they all provide the letter specified in the RFA?

    Answer: Yes, each partner must provide a copy of the specified letter on the letterhead of the partnering agency to receive maximum points on the scoring rubric.

  12. What is meant by partnership expertise?

    Answer: Partnerships formed for the purpose of this grant will be considered as having expertise if they have a proven track record and/or history of success in working with schools and/or districts to incorporate education technology to help enhance teaching and learning.

  13. In regard to Form 9, if the district partners with an entity that does not have a County District School (CDS) code (such as an IHE, non-profit, etc.), what should be listed as the CDS code?

    Answer: In this case, leave the space for the CDS code blank.

  14. Can a district choose a program other than the two example programs included in the RFA, Environmental and Spatial Technology (EAST) and the enhancing Missouri's Instructional Networked Teaching Strategies (eMINTS) models? If a program other than EAST or the eMINTS model is selected, will there be a competitive disadvantage?

    Answer:
    The district does not have to choose either the EAST program or eMINTS, as described in Appendix C of the RFA. These models were included only as examples to assist districts in developing an appropriate model for this grant. Districts should choose a program that is based on a review of relevant research and meets the needs of their students.

    There is no competitive advantage to the selection of any one model. The scoring of the grant will be based on the criteria in the EETT Scoring Rubric.

  15. Can a school district choose more than one program at different sites within one application? If so, how does the district explain that in the application narrative?

    Answer: Yes. Districts may choose more than one program within a single application, depending on individual school site needs. The district should write the application to show a cohesive, comprehensive plan that includes all of the application components.

  16. If the district chooses EAST as the model for their comprehensive program, must they apply directly to the EAST program prior to submission, or can they just select EAST in their application? If EAST is selected in the EETT application and the application is funded, will the district's school(s) automatically become an EAST site(s)?

    Answer: Districts do not need to apply directly to the EAST program. To list EAST as a partner, however, districts must contact EAST to request a letter of support to include in their EETT application. It is highly recommended that any districts considering EAST as an option would have attended one of the vision-building meetings to fully understand the program or would have partnered with an existing EAST site. Those applicants that select EAST as a program option and are funded would sign the grant assurances, and enter into a service agreement with EAST. Grantees will then become official EAST schools.

  17. What defines a "research-based program?" Is there a standard for what counts as "research based?"

    Answer: A program that is considered to be research based can be any in which research by an independent, qualified entity has been conducted, is currently available, and the findings support the program selection. A minimum amount of research has not been established.

  18. How often does the California Technology Assistance Project California Technology Assessment Profile (CTAP2) assessment have to be completed?

    Answer: Teachers participating in the professional development program at each site funded by this grant will complete the CTAP2 Technology Assessment annually during the following time period: July 1, 2005 - June 30, 2006.

  19. Can the grant funds be used to support specific software that allows analysis of student assessment data?

    Answer: Yes, as long as software purchased is part of the comprehensive program that has been clearly articulated in the application.

  20. If during plan evaluation, the district recommends modifications to the approved application, must they be approved by the CDE?

    Answer: If significant changes are made to the plan, CDE must be contacted for approval prior to implementation.

  21. May grant funds be used for programs that benefit non-target classrooms or non-target staff?

    Answer: Targeted classrooms and staff must have first priority for any professional development funded through the EETT Competitive Grant. All professional development is to be selected with the targeted groups in mind. If space and access permits, non-targeted classrooms and/or staff may be included.

  22. How will grant funds be awarded?

    Answer: Funds will be competitively awarded on a geographic basis conforming to the 11 California Technology Assistance Project (CTAP) regions.

  23. How is the student-to-multimedia computer ratio measured?

     Answer: The student-to-multimedia computer ratio is measured by funded school site.

  24. I have heard that there is a federal provision to allow transfer of funds within specific programs. Do the federal principal flexibility provisions affect the EETT competitive grant funds?

    Answer: No. This provision does not apply to the competitive portion of the grant. Funds for this grant must be utilized in accordance with the approved application.

  25. May grant funds be used for grant administration?

    Answer: Yes. However, any costs to be included for grant administration must comply with federal regulations (Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) 34 CFR76.560-76.569).

  26. Our district applied for and received EETT Competitive grant funding for eligible schools in a previous funding round. Can we re-apply for funding in Round 3?

    Answer:
    Districts (or consortiums) that applied for and received full funding for all eligible schools in Round 2 of this grant are not eligible to apply for Round 3 funding. However, districts (or consortiums) that: (1) previously received partial funding for a school or schools; (2) did not include all eligible schools in the Round 2 EETT competitive application; or (3) included a school or schools in the application that were not funded, may re-apply for those schools in the Round 3 application.

    Districts that applied for and received funding in the Round 1 EETT Competitive grant cycle may re-apply for funding in Round 3.

  27. The EETT-Competitive Grant Conditions and Grant Assurances require the LEA to meet at least 70 percent of each required benchmark included in the grant application, as well as any additional benchmark(s) added by the Local Education Agency (LEA), to be eligible to receive one-time follow up funding. How is the 70 percent calculated?

    Answer: The performance benchmark for each required program subsection of the Request for Application (RFA) as defined within the Accountability Measure/Evaluation form is the percentage or number increase over the baseline in the program year.

    For example if the baseline is 80 and the target is 100, this would yield a benchmark of 20. Thus, to meet 70 percent of the benchmark of 20, an increase of at least 14 would need to be attained for a total of at least 94.

    A similar calculation is required for each benchmark within each program section, such as:

    Program for Students Benchmark
    The percentage of students in the target group that demonstrate an increase in their use of technology in year one as a tool to support meeting or exceeding academic content standards will increase from <insert number>% in the 2005-06 school year to insert number>% by 6/29/07.

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Private Schools

  1. Do the equitable participation requirements in Subpart 1 of Part E of Title IX of the ESEA apply to the EETT formula and competitive grant programs?

    Answer: Yes. The equitable participation requirements apply to both of the EETT programs. (See ESEA Section 9501(b)(1).). (Also see Provisions for Private Schools (No Child Left Behind Act Implementation). No funds can be directly given to private schools and the LEA receives no extra funds for private schools. Private schools are eligible to share services and/or benefits that are equitable in comparison to services and benefits for public school children, and must be provided after timely and meaningful consultation with appropriate private school officials. Simply an offer to provide service or an invitation to participate in a program, without sufficient follow-up or additional dialogue, does not satisfy the consultation requirement. More information on the consultation requirements.

  2. How can private schools benefit from these funds?

    Answer: Services and goods are shared with qualified private school. No funds can be directly given to private schools. The goods and/or services that are shared with private schools are agreed upon through a consultation between the private school(s) and the local education agency (LEA).

  3. How does the district know which private school(s) should be included as part of the equitable participation requirement of the grant?

    Answer: For purposes of the EETT grant, private schools must be located within the service area of the district and serve students in grades 4-8. Eligible private schools are usually identified on the Consolidated Application.

  4. What do the equitable participation provisions require LEAs and eligible local entities to do?

    Answer: LEAs and eligible local entities must engage in timely and meaningful consultation with appropriate private school officials during the design and development of programs and continue the consultation throughout the implementation of these programs. Therefore, for both EETT formula and competitive awards, the consultation should begin during the development of the local grant proposals. Eligible LEAs that seek both competitive and formula funding under EETT may engage in consultations that simultaneously involve the EETT competitive and formula grants.

  5. What types of services or benefits must an LEA provide to private schools?

    Answer: LEAs and local entities must provide, on an equitable basis, special educational services or other benefits that address the needs under the program of children, teachers, and other educational personnel in private schools in areas served by the LEAs and local entities. Expenditures for educational services and other benefits for private school children, teachers, and other educational personnel must be equal, taking into account the number and educational needs of the children to be served, to the expenditures for participating public school children.

  6. Does a county office of education have to consult with all of the private schools in their service area if school districts within that service area are already engaged in consultation with the appropriate private school officials?

    Answer: No. The district of residence is responsible for providing services to eligible students in private schools, as long as the residence has been determined and established within a district's boundaries that would be responsible.

  7. If a private school asks for staff development support from the LEA, but does not want to utilize the LEA's trainer, who is ultimately responsible for paying the outside trainer?

    Answer: The size and scope of services is decided through the consultation process. If it is determined that the needs of private school students will be best met through staff development activities for the staff working with the eligible students, then the two parties decide on "who, what and where" of the services. It is not a unilateral decision by either party. The LEA makes the final decision.

  8. Should the LEA consider poverty as a factor when determining the level of service and benefits to private schools under Title II Part D?

    Answer: The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act provides for the participation of private schools in a number of programs. (NCLB Section 9501), including Title II Part D. This section of the law requires LEAs to conduct "...timely and meaningful consultation with appropriate private school officials..." to provide, on an equitable basis, services and other benefits that address their needs. LEAs, in the consultative process, must consider the enrollment and needs of private school students, and may consider the incidence of poverty. The consultation process normally includes discussions on how children's needs are identified, services to be offered, the delivery methods of services, and assessments to determine results of the service. The consultation with private schools"...shall occur before the LEA makes any decision that affects the opportunities of eligible private school children, teachers and other educational personnel..." In most areas throughout the state there exist private school associations and consortiums that can facilitate the dialogue. For additional information please refer to NCLB Section 9502. For general information please contact Marleen Allin at mallin@cde.ca.gov. For NCLB Title II, Part D (Enhancing Education Through Technology) questions, contact the Education Technology Office at edtech@cde.ca.gov.

  9. Which private schools must be consulted during the consultation process for Title II Part D?

    Answer: The consultation process must inform private schools of all services they are eligible to receive under NCLB, including those funded under Title II Part D. The Consolidated Application includes a list of appropriate private schools that LEAs are to involve in the consultative process. The CDE Web site also maintains a list of private non-profit schools that may enroll students who are eligible for services under the federal No Child Left Behind program.

  10. If the only private schools in the district boundaries are high schools that do not have students in grades 4-8 (the targeted grades for the competitive EETT grant), does the district still need to include these high schools in the private school consultation process?

    Answer: Yes. the consultation process must inform private schools of all services they are eligible to receive under NCLB, including those services that might be available under the competitive grant program under Title II Part D. The law requires LEAs to conduct "...timely and meaningful consultation with appropriate private school officials..." to provide, on an equitable basis, services and other benefits that address their needs. To the extent that public schools in the district have 9th grade students that receive services from the EETT competitive grant program (this could be schools that did not receive Digital High School funds), then 9th grade private school students may also qualify to receive services on an equitable basis. The Consolidated Application includes a list of appropriate private schools that LEAs are to involve in the consultative process. The CDE Web site also maintains a list of private non-profit schools that may enroll students who are eligible for services under the federal No Child Left Behind program.

  11. If private schools refuse to provide the LEA with information on their free and reduced lunch counts, do they still need to be included (receive services) as part of the EETT grant?

    Answer: Yes. private schools are still entitled to services; LEAs should not deny services to private schools simply for not providing free and reduced price lunch data. Regarding private school participation in NCLB Title II Part D, the size and scope of services is decided through the consultation process and the consultation process may consider the incidence of poverty. LEAs may choose from several different methods to calculate the number of eligible children.

    Expenditures for educational services and other benefits for private school children, teachers, and other educational personnel must be equitable to the expenditures for participating public school children, taking into account the number and educational needs of the children to be served.

  12. What type of documentation is required regarding the private school consultation process for EETT Title II Part D?

    Answer: NCLB, Section 1120 (b) requires that each LEA must maintain, in the agency's records, written affirmation signed by officials of each participating private school that the required consultation has occurred. When CDE conducts a district coordinated compliance review, they will check these documents for appropriate signatures.

    The assurances for both the EETT competitive and formula grants under Title II Part D require that each LEA must, only upon request, provide CDE with a copy of written affirmation that the required consultation has occurred. Refer to Assurance #23 in the EETT Competitive Grant RFA and Grant Condition #8 in the EETT Formula Grant RFA.

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Questions: Education Technology Office | edtech@cde.ca.gov | 916-323-5715 
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