Skip to content
Printer-friendly version

Power Point Education Specifications


This is an Accessible Alternative Version of the Power Point Presentation: Educational Specifications (PPT) and Master Planning (PPT). The Power Point Presentation should be the preferred version for downloading.

Fred Yeager, California Department of Education, School Facilities Planning Division

Slides:

1. Goals
2. What is an Educational Specification?

Quick Description - "Form follows function".

3. Why Use and Educational Specification?
4. Why Use an Educational Specification?
5. Why Use and Educational Specification?
6. How to Develop an Educational Specification?
7. Why Use an Educational Specification?

Educational Specifications, Linking Design of School Facilities to Educational Program, 1997 California Department of Education.

8. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

Educational Specifications are interrelated statements that communicate what educators believe is required to support a specific educational program.

Back to top

9. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

Educational Specifications serve as the link between the educational program and the school facility.

10. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

Educational program is the process used to deliver the adopted curricula.

11. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

"Educational program" examples:

12. How do Students Learn? (Adults too!)

Three basic ways people learn:

  1. Visual.
  2. Auditory.
  3. Kinesthetic.

Source: The Learning Curve, Learning Modalities

13. Characteristics of a Visual Learner

Include:

14. How to Teach a Visual Learner
15. Characteristics of an Auditory Learner

Include:

16. How to Teach and Auditory Learner
17. Characteristics of a Kinesthetic Learner

Include:

18. How to Teach a Kinesthetic Learner

Back to top

19. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

"Use words to allow the architect to visualize the educational activity to be conducted."

Example for an elementary school:

"Classroom instruction will use project based activities to reinforce lecture. Technology will be used to supplement teacher provided instruction."

To an architect this may mean:

20. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

The educational program does not presume nor describe an architectural solution.

For example:

21. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

Example from a real high school:

"The school will be organized around the concept of small learning communities (SLC) to ensure that students have a sense of belonging and are known by teachers and administrators who are capable of offering personalized academic and emotional support. SLCs would maximize opportunities for team teaching and integrated content learning experiences."

"...Elective course will be organized in broad centers that integrate academics with postsecondary learning and employment opportunities."

For an architect this may mean:

22. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Not Defined

Educational specifications are not:

23. Chapter 2 - The Role of Educational Specifications in Facility Planning
24. Chapter 3 - Development of Educational Specifications

High level leadership:

Back to top

25. Chapter 3 - Development of Educational Specifications

Created by Committee:

26. Chapter 3 - Development of Educational Specifications

Program Director:

27. Chapter 3 - Development of Educational Specifications

Program Director:

28. Chapter 3 - Speaking of Educational Trends....

Some trends:

How does the community and district see education in the future?

29. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part I Project Description:

Back to top

30. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part II Project Design Factors

 

31. Chapter 4 -Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements:

  1. Name of activity area.
  2. Program philosophy, goals, and outcomes.
  3. Curriculum and anticipated use.
  4. Trends.
  5. General requirements, grouping, and adjacency.
  6. Space requirements.
  7. Individual space description - "micro-environment".
32. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Classroom Requirements:

  1. Name - Elementary classroom (grades 4-6).
33. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements:

  1. Program philosophy, goals, and outcomes.
    • The classroom is the basic instruction area. It should be inviting and familiar and support students' needs for safety and security.

      Sixth grades students will begin the transition to a middle school environment with a modified block schedule.
34. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements:

  1. Curriculum anticipated.
    Instruction in all subject areas of the district's adopted curriculum will occur in the classrooms. Opportunities for team teaching and small group instruction will be used to accommodate multiple learning styles.

    Pull-out programs will be used for intervention and enrichment.

    Additionally, sixth grade students will be transitioned into middle school curriculum by having two teachers with students moving between adjacent classrooms. Classrooms will need to support the science and art curriculums used in the district's middle schools.
35. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements:

  1. Trends
    Research on how students learn and the continued increasing role of technology requires classrooms to be large enough to allow flexibility in response to future needs.

    Parental involvement is shown to improve student attendance and achievement. Space in each classroom is to be provided as a parent work space.

    An increased focus on health requires multiple sinks to allow students to wash hands frequently.

Back to top

36. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. General requirements, grouping, and adjacency
    Classrooms shall be grouped in grade level pods and have areas for small group instruction, large group instruction, and project work.

    Classroom buildings should be located away from off-site noise such as traffic.

    Lockers will be provided for the sixth graders to further transition the middle school experience and to minimize the space taken up by backpacks in the classroom.
37. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. Space requirements
    Classrooms should be sized and designed to accommodate:
    • Small group instruction.
    • The number of students per teacher as defined in the contract.
    • Parents.
    • Special educational students and aides.
    Storage for student projects and curriculum material is necessary.
38. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. Individual space description
    Acoustic treatment is necessary to support small group and cooperative learning.

    High ceilings are needed to allow clear visual lines of sight and the use of ceiling mounted audio-visual equipment.

    A secure storage area for laptop computers is required.

    Tackable wall surfaces are needed to display student work.
39. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. Name: High School Multipurpose Room
40. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. Program philosophy, goals, and outcomes
    The ability of students to gather informally aids in creating student connectivity to school and in developing interpersonal relations. The space should be familiar and inviting.

    The multipurpose room also serves as a critical link between school and community.
41. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. Curriculum anticipated
    The multipurpose room will be sued as the main food service venue. Adjacent outdoor covered area will supplement interior area and will visually and functionally be connected to the multipurpose room.

    Breakfast and snack service will also be provided.

    Activities such as public meetings, class assemblies, and club activities will also occur so extensive secured storage is needed.

Back to top

42. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. Trends
    Nutrition and fitness are increasingly being recognized as crucial elements of student success.

    Community use helps to create the school-community bond that is essential for academic success. As such, the multipurpose room should be viewed as a community resource that is open on evenings and weekends.
43. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. General requirements, grouping, and adjacency
    The multipurpose room must be located next to the central quad and covered dining area to encourage student access and gathering.

    It must be able to be secured from the rest of the campus when used for community events and located in an area readily accessible by service vehicles.
44. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. Space requirements
    The multipurpose room must be able to serve 750 students at one time in a "food court" setting.

    Must have large open areas with clear lines of sight and flexibility to encourage informal student gatherings.

    Smaller "warming" kitchens easily secured from the main kitchen are available for snack service and community use.
45. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. Individual space description
    Durable and easily maintained floor covering is necessary due to the extensive use of the space.

    Display cabinets and tackable wall surfaces are necessary to allow for the display of school awards and student work.

    An audio-visual system is required for school and community events.
46. Chapters 5-7 Annotated Outline

More detailed information for outlines provided in Chapters 1-4.

Back to top

47. Post Occupancy Evaluation
48. How can the use of educational specifications be increased?
49. A Test

"Use words to allow the architect to visualize the educational activity to be conducted."

Example for a high school classroom:

"Cross-disciplinary instruction will be the basis of all learning in order to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of core academic areas."

"Team teaching, small group instruction, and project based instruction will be used to better address the range of learning styles."

To an architect this may mean:

50. Choice 1

This slide is a picture of a layout of a classroom that is 24' x 40' containing 30 desks and 6 computers desks.

51. Choice 2

This slide is a picture of a layout of two classrooms each 964 square feet along with a third room that is 178 square feet. Each classroom contains 30 desks.

52. Resources

Educational Specifications:

Other:

Back to top

Questions:   Fred Yeager | fyeager@cde.ca.gov | 916-327-7148
Download Free Readers