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Educational Specifications Power Point


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Educational Specifications

Fred Yeager
California Department of Education
School Facilities Planning Division

1. Educational Specifications
2. Adding Building to An Existing Site
3. What is an Educational Specification
4. When to have an Educational Specification
5. Why Use an Educational Specification
6. Why Use an Educational Specification

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7. Why Use an Educational Specification
8. How CDE Uses an Educational Specification
9. How CDE Uses an Educational Specification
10. How to Develop an Educational Specification

Educational Specifications, Linking Design of School Facilities to Educational Program
1997 California Department of Education

11. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

Educational specifications are interrelated statements that communicate what educators believe is required to support a specific educational program

12. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

Educational specifications serve as the link between the educational program and the school facility

13. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

Educational Program - "The educational program describes the curricula, learning support programs activities, and persons to be served..."

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14. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

Educational Program (cont.) - "...defines educational requirements; and represents local community consensus on educational priorities..."

15. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

Educational Program (cont.) - "...it should be prepared by educators and should not prematurely suggest architectural solutions..."

16. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

"Educational Program" examples:

17. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

"Use words to allow the architect to visualize the educational activity to be conducted."

Example of an elementary school

To an architect this may mean:

18. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

The educational program does not presume nor describe an architectural solution

For example:

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19. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

Example from a real high school

For an architect this may mean:

20. Chapter 1 - Educational Specifications Defined

Educational specifications are not:

21. Chapter 2 - The Role of Educational Specifications in Facility Planning

Chart showing flow of educational specifications in the planning of a school facility

22. Chapter 3 - Development of Educational Specifications

High level leadership

23. Chapter 3 - Development of Educational Specifications
24. Chapter 3 - Development of Educational Specifications

Program Director

25. Chapter 3 - Development of Educational Specifications

Program Director

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26. Chapter 3 - Speaking of Educational Trends

Some trends

How does your community and district see education in the future?

27. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part I Project Description

28. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part II Project Design Factors

29. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. Name of activity area
  2. Program philosophy, goals, and outcomes
  3. Curriculum and anticipated use
  4. Trends
  5. General requirements, grouping, and adjacency
  6. Space requirements
  7. Individual space description - "micro environment"

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30. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Classroom Requirements

  1. Name: Elementary Classroom (grades 4-6)
31. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Classroom Requirements

  1. Program philosophy, goals, and outcomes
    The classroom is the basic instruction area where all curriculum will be delivered. It must be flexible to allow small group instruction, project areas, and video and audio instruction.

    It must be inviting and familiar and support students' needs for safety and security.

    Sixth grade students will begin the transition to a middle school environment with a modified block schedule.
32. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Classroom Requirements

  1. Curriculum anticipated
    Instruction in all subject areas of the district's adopted curriculum will occur in the classrooms. Opportunities for team teaching and small group instruction will be used to accommodate multiple learning styles.

    In room aids will assist teacher with individual and small group instruction.

    The 6th grade students will be transitioned into middle school curriculum by having two teachers with students moving between adjacent classrooms. Classrooms will need to support the science and art programs used in the district's middle schools.
33. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Classroom Requirements

  1. Trends
    Research on how students learn and the continued increasing role of technology requires classrooms to be large enough to allow flexibility in response to future needs.

    Parental involvement is shown to improve student attendance and achievement. Space in each classroom is to be provided as a parent work space.

    An increased focus on health requires multiple sinks to allow students to wash hands frequently.
34. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Classroom Requirements

  1. General requirements, grouping, and adjacency
    Classrooms shall be grouped in grade level pods and have areas for small group instruction, large group instruction, and project work.

    Classroom buildings should be located away from off-site noise such as traffic.

    Lockers will be provided for the sixth graders to further transition the middle school experience and to minimize the space taken up by backpacks in the classroom.
35. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Classroom Requirements

  1. Space requirements
    Classrooms should be sized designed to accommodate small group instruction, the number of students per teacher as defined in the contract, parents, and special education students and aides.

    Storage for student projects and curriculum material is necessary.
36. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Classroom Requirements

  1. Individual space description
    Acoustic treatment is necessary to support small group and cooperative learning.

    High ceilings are needed to allow clear visual lines of sight and the use of ceiling mounted audio-visual equipment.

    Day-lighting is to be maximized by the use of building orientation and solar tubes/skylights.

    A secure storage area for laptop computers is required.

    Tackable wall surfaces are needed to display student work.

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37. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. Name: High School Multipurpose Room
38. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. Program philosophy
    The ability of students to gather informally aids in creating student connectivity to school and in developing interpersonal relations. The space should be familiar and inviting.

    The multipurpose room also serves as a critical link between school and community.
39. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. Curriculum anticipated
    The multipurpose room will be used as the main food service venue. Adjacent outdoor covered area will supplement interior area and will visually and functionally be connected to the multipurpose room.

    Breakfast and snack service will also be provided.

    Activities such as public meetings, class assemblies, and club activities will also occur so extensive secured storage is needed.
40. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. Trends
    Nutrition and fitness are increasingly being recognized as crucial elements of student success.

    Community use helps to create the school-community bond that is essential for academic success. As such, the multipurpose room should be viewed as a community resource that is open on evenings and weekends.
41. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. General requirements, grouping, and adjacency
    The multipurpose room must be located next to the central quad and covered dining area to encourage student access and gathering.

    It must be able to be secured from the rest of the campus when used for community events and coated in an area readily accessible by service vehicles.
42. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. Space requirements
    The multipurpose room must be able to serve 750 students at one time in a "food court" setting.

    Must have large open areas with clear lines of sight and flexibility to encourage informal student gathering.

    Smaller "warming" kitchens easily secured from the main kitchen are available for snack service and community use.
43. Chapter 4 - Suggested Format for Educational Specifications

Part III Activity Area Requirements

  1. Individual space description
    Durable and easily maintained floor covering is necessary due to the extensive use of the space.

    Display cabinets and tackable wall surfaces are necessary to allow for the display of school awards and student work.

    An audio-visual system is required for school and community events.
44. Rest of the Story

Chapter 5-7 provide annotated outlines and more detailed guidance

Appendix 2 - Remodeling Facilities

Appendix 4 - Selecting the Architect

Appendix 5 - Project Delivery

45. Rest of the Story

Appendix 6 - Site Selection

Appendix 7 - Safe Architecture

Appendix 8 - School Disaster Preparedness Planning

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46. Rest of the Story

Appendix 9 - Facility Activation, Orientation, and Post Occupancy Evaluation

Appendix 10 - Facilities Inspection Summary

Appendix 11 - Constructability Reviews

47. Post Occupancy Evaluation
48. How Can the Use of Educational Specifications be Increased?
49. Resources
50. Adding Buildings to an Existing Site

Adding students

51. Adding Buildings to an Existing Site

Changing grade levels

52. Adding Buildings to an Existing Site

Changing program

53. Adding Buildings to an Existing Site

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54. Adding Buildings to an Existing Site

Areas to evaluate include:

55. Adding Buildings to an Existing Site

Areas to evaluate include:

56. Adding Buildings to an Existing Site

Areas to evaluate include:

57. Adding Buildings to an Existing Site

Areas to evaluate include:

58. Adding Buildings to an Existing Site

Areas to evaluate include:

59. Adding Buildings to an Existing Site

Areas to evaluate include:

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60. Adding Buildings to an Existing Site

Areas to evaluate include:

61. Adding Buildings to an Existing Site

Areas to evaluate include:

62. Adding Buildings to an Existing Site
63. Adding Buildings to an Existing Site
64. Site Addition

Existing Site Certification on SFPD 4.07/08

California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Section 14010:

  1. Power lines/electromagnetic fields
  2. Within 1500 feet of a railroad
  3. Traffic noise
  4. Active fault or fault trace
  5. Flood or dam inundation area
  6. Near an above ground water or fuel storage tank or within 1500 feet of a pipeline, which can pose a safety hazard
  7. Liquefaction/landslides
  8. Traffic/pedestrian safety
  9. Compatible existing and proposed surrounding land uses
  10. Exposure to adverse light, wind, and air pollution
  11. Easements restricting access or building placement
  12. Within 2000 feet of a significant disposal or hazardous waste

Comments:

65. Resources - Site Addition

Resources

66. Contacts

School Facilities & Transportation Services Division
916-322-2470

fredyeager@cde.ca.gov, Assistant Director
916-327-7148

Questions:   Fred Yeager |fyeager@cde.ca.gov | 916-327-7148
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