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Library Frequently Asked Questions


State Funding
  1. Local Control Funding Formula
  2. For historical information on School and Library Improvement Block Grant FAQs
Additional Funding Sources
  1. What grant opportunities are available for books and libraries?
  2. How are school libraries funded in California?
  3. Can the Library program be included in the LCAP (Local Control Accountability Plan)?
School Library Staffing
  1. Where is library paraprofessional training offered in California?
  2. What credentials are required to be a library media teacher in California?
  3. Which California colleges and universities offer the library media teacher credential?
  4. Will a school lose its WASC accreditation if it doesn't have a credentialed library media teacher in the library?
  5. How does a library media teacher from another state get credentials and transcripts evaluated for California requirements?
  6. Where is help offered for those developing new school library programs?

Additional Funding Sources
  1. What grant opportunities are available for books and libraries?

    State grant opportunities focused on library improvement include the LSTA (Library Services and Technology Act) External link opens in new window or tab., Improving Literacy Through School Libraries (NCLB Grant) External link opens in new window or tab., and the Laura Bush Foundation for America's Libraries External link opens in new window or tab..

    For a list of grants for your school or district, checkout Follet - Grants and Funding External link opens in new window or tab. . The 137 page documents lists grants for 33 differencet subject areas and is searchable.
  2. How are school libraries funded in California?

    The California Department of Education collects annual information about California public school libraries. Based on responses from about 50% of California Kindergarten through grade 12 schools, the following funding sources were indicated:
Funding sources available in the 2015–2016 fiscal year The following percentage reflects the number of school libraries funded by each source

General/LCFF (district or site)

53%

State Lottery Funds

8%

Fundraising (parent groups, book fairs, etc.)

49%

Title I (federal)

12%

Local Bond Measures

1%

Start-up Funds (special reserve fund)

0.5%

Other (one-time discretionary grants to districts, etc.)

11%

None of the above

12%

  1. Can the library program be included in the LCAP (Local Control Accountability Plan)?

    Yes, your library program can be written into the LCAP. The California School Library Association has created a webpage with webinars and resources to include school library programs in the LCAPS.
School Library Staffing

  1. Where is library paraprofessional training offered in California?

    The following community colleges offer library/information technology courses:

    City College of San Francisco External link opens in new window or tab.
    Cuesta College, San Luis Obispo External link opens in new window or tab.
    Diablo Valley College, Pleasant Hill External link opens in new window or tab.
    Fresno City College, Fresno External link opens in new window or tab.
    Pasadena City College External link opens in new window or tab.
    Palomar College, San Marcos External link opens in new window or tab.
    Sacramento City College, Sacramento External link opens in new window or tab.
    San Bernardino Valley College, San Bernardino External link opens in new window or tab.
    Santa Ana College, Santa Ana External link opens in new window or tab.


  2. What credentials are required to be a library media teacher in California?

    A California teacher librarian has both a valid teaching credential and a teacher librarian services credential. It is considered a pupil services credential. Basic Credential Information External link opens in new window or tab.. See "Library Service Credentials".

  3. Which California colleges and universities offer the teacher librarian credential?

    Find a program to become a California Library Media Teacher

  4. Will a school lose its WASC accreditation if it doesn't have a credentialed library media teacher in the library?

    The lack of a library media teacher does not prevent a school from being accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) External link opens in new window or tab.. The California School Library Association has developed a document to assist with a review of the school library media program called WASC/CDE Focus on Learning External link opens in new window or tab. (PDF).  


  5. How does a library media teacher from another state get credentials and transcripts evaluated for California requirements?

    The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) External link opens in new window or tab., not the Department of Education, determines whether credentials from other states are valid in California. If the credential holder is already living in California, the evaluation is done by one of the colleges and universities offering the library media teacher credential. If still out-of-state, the credential holder can request an evaluation by the CTC.


  6. Where is help offered for those developing new school library programs?

    On-going staff development is often offered to school library personnel by the county office of education. Schools that contract with the county office for library services may have library consulting services offered as part of the contract. The California School Library Association (CSLA) External link opens in new window or tab. frequently offers workshops, conferences, and exhibits. CSLA is developing a list of retired library professionals who are willing to work with schools and districts on school library development.

Questions:   Curriculum Frameworks and Instructional Resources Division | CFIRD@cde.ca.gov | 916-319-0881
Last Reviewed: Wednesday, November 7, 2018