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Stronger Together: Health and Safety

Part of Stronger Together: A Guidebook for the Safe Reopening of California's Public Schools. Created through the Reopening Schools Task Force that fostered a collaborative process for educators and stakeholders to lend their important voices.

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The health and safety of students and staff is the top priority when making the decision to physically reopen school campuses for use by students, staff, and others. Local educational agencies should work in collaboration with their local health officials in making the decision to safely reopen. Per CDC recommendations, the CDE recommends all staff and students should wear cloth face coverings or face shields while at school or on a bus, and maintain 6 feet of physical distance during school activities.

When the decision is made to reopen, LEAs will need to establish clear plans and protocols to ensure the safety of students and staff. Knowing that there is not a “one-size-fits-all” solution for opening schools across California’s 1,000 LEAs, the CDE has created a comprehensive checklist of health and safety items that LEAs should use to guide the important reopening decisions they will be making. This checklist was developed in consultation with the California Department of Public Health, the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, school labor and management representatives, California LEAs, and officials from other states to provide a comprehensive menu of considerations for LEAs.

While the checklist focuses on statewide guidance, the final decision to reopen will be made by each LEA working in close collaboration with local health officials and community stakeholders, including families, staff, and labor partners. When a school is reopened, it is important that LEAs continue to communicate with local and state authorities to monitor current disease levels and the capacities of the local health providers and health care systems. Items in the checklist will likely require collaboration between labor and management groups and in some cases a revisit of existing bargaining agreements. These are matters that would be resolved as part of the reopening planning process and prior to school starting so as to provide clarity for reopening. This checklist will support LEA leaders in their ongoing collaboration with their school communities and health professionals about reopening strategies.

The following checklist covers the following main categories:

  1. Local Conditions to Guide Reopening Decisions
  2. Plan to Address Positive COVID-19 Cases or Community Surges
  3. Injury and Illness Prevention Program
  4. Campus Access
  5. Hygiene
  6. Protective Equipment
  7. Physical Distancing
  8. Cleaning/Disinfecting
  9. Employee Issues
  10. Communication with Students, Parents, Employees, Public Health Officials, and the Community

CDE Health and Safety Checklist

LEA Checklist for Physically Reopening Campuses for Students

  1. Local Conditions. Ensure that the following local conditions are in place:
    1. Flexibility or Lifting of State Stay-Home Order
      1. The state has lifted or relaxed the stay-home order to allow schools to physically reopen.
    2. Flexibility or Lifting of County Stay-Home Order
      1. The county has lifted or relaxed the stay-home or shelter-in-place order to allow schools to physically reopen.
    3. Local Public Health Clearance. Local public health officials have made determinations, including, but not limited to, the following:
      1. Testing Availability. Consult with local public health officials to ensure adequate tests and tracking/tracing resources are available for schools to reopen. Employees have access to COVID-19 testing at regular and ongoing intervals.
      2. Sufficient duration of decline or stability of confirmed cases, hospitalizations, and deaths.
      3. Sufficient surge capacity exists in local hospitals.
    4. Equipment Availability
      1. Have sufficient protective equipment to comply with California Department of Public Health (CDPH) guidance for students and staff appropriate for each classification or duty, as well as relevant California Division of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Cal/OSHA) requirements.
      2. Have a plan for an ongoing supply of protective equipment.
      3. Purchase a sufficient number of no-touch thermal scan thermometers for symptom screenings.
      4. Consider the differing requirements of PPE/EPG for the differing populations of students with disabilities (i.e., for those requiring medical procedures, toileting, lifting and mobility assistance) .
    5. Cleaning Supply Availability
      1. Have enough school-appropriate cleaning supplies to continuously disinfect the school site in accordance with CDPH guidance.
      2. Ensure sufficient supplies of hand sanitizers, soap, handwashing stations, tissues, no-touch trash cans, and paper towels.

  2. Plan to Address Positive COVID-19 Cases or Community Surges
    1. Establish a plan to close schools again for physical attendance of students, if necessary, based on public health guidance and in coordination with local public health officials.
    2. In accordance with CDPH guidance, when a student, teacher, or staff member or a member of their household tests positive for COVID-19 and has exposed others at the school implement the following steps:
      1. In consultation with the local public health officials, the appropriate school official may consider whether school closure is warranted and length of time based on the risk level within the specific community as determined by the local public health officer.
      2. In accordance with standard guidance for isolation at home after close contact, the classroom or office where the COVID-19-positive individual was based will typically need to close temporarily as students or staff isolate.
      3. Additional close contacts at school outside of a classroom should also isolate at home.
      4. Additional areas of the school visited by the COVID-19-positive individual may also need to be closed temporarily for cleaning and disinfection.
      5. Develop a plan for continuity of education, medical and social services, and meal programs and establish alternate mechanisms for these to continue.

  3. Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP)
    1. Update the IIPP External link opens in new window or tab. to address unique circumstances during the COVID-19 crisis and make updates accessible to employees and parents.

  4. Campus Access. Develop a plan to minimize access to campus, and limit nonessential visitors, facility use permits, and volunteers.
    1. Exclude any student, parent, caregiver, visitor, or staff showing symptoms of COVID-19 (reference CDC and CDPH guidelines for COVID-19 symptoms). Staff should discuss with the parent or caregiver and refer to the student’s health history form or emergency card to identify whether the student has a history of allergies, which would not be a reason to exclude.
    2. Monitor staff and students throughout the day for signs of illness. Determine any special or unique needs for students with disabilities related to planned district or schoolwide procedures.
    3. Students—Entering Campuses
      1. Passive Screening. Instruct parents to screen students before leaving for school (check temperature to ensure temperatures below 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit, observe for symptoms outlined by public health officials) and to keep students at home if they have symptoms consistent with COVID-19 or if they have had close contact with a person diagnosed with COVID-19.
      2. Active Screening. Engage in symptom screening as students enter campus and buses, consistent with public health guidance, which includes visual wellness checks and temperature checks with no-touch thermometers (check temperature to ensure temperatures below 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit), and ask all students about COVID-19 symptoms within the last 24 hours and whether anyone in their home has had COVID-19 symptoms or a positive test.
        1. If a thermometer requiring a touch method (under the tongue or arm, forehead, etc.) is the only type available, it should only be used when a fever is suspected and caution is taken by temperature screeners such as gloves, eye protection, and mask.
        2. Thermometers must be properly cleaned and disinfected after each use.
      3. All students must wash or sanitize hands as they enter campuses and buses.
      4. Provide supervised, sufficient points of access to avoid larger gatherings.
      5. Use privacy boards or clear screens when practicable.
      6. If a student is symptomatic while entering campus or during the school day:
        1. Students who develop symptoms of illness while at school should be separated from others right away, preferably isolated in an area through which others do not enter or pass. If more than one student is in an isolation area, ensure physical distancing.
        2. Any students or staff exhibiting symptoms should be required to immediately wear a face covering and wait in an isolation area until they can be transported home or to a health care facility.
        3. Students should remain in isolation with continued supervision and care until picked up by an authorized adult.
        4. Follow established guidelines for triaging students in the health office, recognizing not all symptoms are COVID-19 related.
        5. Advise parents of sick students that students are not to return until they have met CDC criteria to discontinue home isolation External link opens in new window or tab..
      7. Develop a plan for if students are symptomatic when boarding the bus.
      8. Protect and support students who are at higher risk for severe illness (medical conditions that the CDC says may have increased risks External link opens in new window or tab.) or who cannot safely distance from household contacts at higher risk by providing options such as virtual learning or independent study.
    4. Staff—Entering Campuses
      1. Passive Screening. Instruct staff to self-screen before leaving for work (check temperature to ensure temperatures below 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit, check for symptoms outlined by public health officials) and to stay home if they have symptoms consistent with COVID-19 or if they have had close contact with a person diagnosed with COVID-19.
      2. Active Screening. Engage in symptom screening as staff enter worksites, consistent with public health guidance, which includes visual wellness checks and temperature checks with no-touch thermometers (check temperature to ensure temperatures below 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit), and ask all staff about COVID-19 symptoms within the last 24 hours and whether anyone in their home has had COVID-19 symptoms or a positive test.
        1. If a thermometer requiring a touch method (under the tongue or arm, forehead, etc.) is the only type available, it should only be used when a fever is suspected.
        2. Thermometers must be properly cleaned and disinfected after each use.
      3. All staff must wash or sanitize hands as they enter worksites.
      4. Exclude employees who are exhibiting symptoms from the workplace.
        1. Staff members who develop symptoms of illness should be sent to medical care. Have emergency substitute plans in place.
        2. Create a procedure for reporting the reasons for the exclusions.
        3. Advise sick staff members not to return until they have met CDC criteria to discontinue home isolation External link opens in new window or tab..
    5. Outside Visitors and Groups
      1. Limit access to campus for parents and other visitors.
      2. Evaluate whether and to what extent external community organizations can safely utilize the site and campus resources. Ensure external community organizations that use the facilities also follow the school’s health and safety plans and CDPH guidance.
      3. Review facility use agreements and establish common facility protocols for all users of the facility.
      4. Establish protocol for accepting deliveries safely.
      5. Charter School Co-locations
        1. Update facility use agreements to address unique circumstances during the COVID-19 crisis, ensuring that organizations that are using the same facility have agreed to the same understandings about how to reopen in a healthy and safe way. Establish a protocol for responding to site concerns regarding health and safety issues that arise during the pandemic that is collaborative and meets the needs of all stakeholders.

  5. Hygiene. Plan to address hygiene practices External link opens in new window or tab. (PDF) to ensure personal health and safety in school facilities and vehicles.
    1. Handwashing. In accordance with CDPH and Cal/OSHA guidance and in consultation with local public health officials, develop a plan for handwashing that includes:
      1. Providing opportunities for students and staff to meet handwashing frequency guidance.
      2. Ensuring sufficient access to handwashing and sanitizer stations . Consider portable handwashing stations throughout a site and near classrooms to minimize movement and congregations in bathrooms to the extent possible.
      3. Ensuring fragrance-free hand sanitizer (with a minimum of 60 percent alcohol) is available and supervised at or near all workstations and on buses. Children under age nine should use hand sanitizer under adult supervision. Call Poison Control if consumed: 1-800-222-1222. Note: frequent handwashing is more effective than the use of hand sanitizers.
    2. Train staff and students on proper handwashing techniques and PPE/EPG use, including the following:
      1. Scrub with soap for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not accessible . Staff and students should use paper towels (or single use cloth towels) to dry hands thoroughly.
      2. Wash hands when: arriving and leaving home; arriving at and leaving school; after playing outside; after having close contact with others; after using shared surfaces or tools; before and after using restroom; after blowing nose, coughing, and sneezing; and before and after eating and preparing foods.
      3. CDC guidance External link opens in new window or tab. on proper PPE use.
    3. Teach staff and students to:
      1. Use tissue to wipe the nose and cough and sneeze inside the tissue.
      2. Not touch the face or face covering.

  6. Protective Equipment. Plan to address protective equipment needs to ensure personal health and safety in school facilities and vehicles.
    1. According to CDC guidance:
      1. Training and information External link opens in new window or tab. should be provided to staff and students on proper use, removal, and washing of cloth face coverings.
      2. Face coverings are not recommended for anyone who has trouble breathing or is unconscious, incapacitated, or otherwise unable to remove the covering without assistance. LEAs should make reasonable accommodations such as a face shield with a cloth drape for those who are unable to wear face coverings for medical reasons. Per Cal/OSHA, considerations for face shields should include a cloth drape attached across the bottom and tucked into shirt.
      3. Cloth face coverings are meant to protect other people in case the wearer is unknowingly infected (many people carry COVID-19 but do not have symptoms). Cloth face coverings are not surgical masks, respirators, or personal protective equipment.
    2. Staff Protective Equipment
      1. As recommended by the CDC, all staff should wear face coverings. Per CDPH guidance, teachers could use face shields, which enable students to see their faces and to avoid potential barriers to phonological instruction.
      2. Provide masks if the employee does not have a clean face covering.
      3. Provide other protective equipment, as appropriate for work assignments.
        1. For employees engaging in symptom screening, provide surgical masks, face shields, and disposable gloves.
        2. For front office and food service employees, provide face coverings and disposable gloves.
        3. For custodial staff, provide equipment and PPE for cleaning and disinfecting, including:
          1. For regular surface cleaning, provide gloves appropriate for all cleaning and disinfecting.
          2. Classified staff engaged in deep cleaning and disinfecting should be equipped with proper PPE for COVID-19 disinfection (disposable gown, gloves, eye protection, and mask or respirator) in addition to PPE as required by product instructions. All products must be kept out of children’s reach and stored in a space with restricted access.
          3. Cal/OSHA requires that PPE be provided and worn to effectively protect employees from the hazards of the cleaning products used and training be provided to staff on the hazards of chemicals.
    3. Student Protective Equipment
      1. Students should use cloth face coverings, especially in circumstances when physical distancing cannot be maintained. If an LEA requires students to wear face coverings, then the LEA must provide face coverings to be used. At a minimum, face coverings should be worn:
        1. While waiting to enter the school campus.
        2. While on school grounds (except when eating or drinking).
        3. While leaving school.
        4. While on a school bus.
          1. Driver has access to surplus masks to provide to students who are symptomatic on the bus.

  7. Physical Distancing. Plan to meet physical distancing standards in school facilities and vehicles. Clearly define how staff can honor physical distancing recommendations, yet meet student medical, personal, or support needs. Determine how adequate space and facilities will be utilized to maintain health and safety of students and staff, especially when tending to individual student medical or personal needs.
    1. Plan to limit the number of people in all campus spaces to the number that can be reasonably accommodated while maintaining a minimum of six feet of distance between individuals. (Six feet is the current minimum recommendation for physical distancing from the CDC, but it is important to pay attention to future modifications in public health recommendations.)
    2. To the extent possible, and as recommended by the CDC, attempt to create smaller student/educator cohorts to minimize the mixing of student groups throughout the day. Minimize movement of students, educators, and staff as much as possible.
    3. In a circumstance where sufficient physical distancing is difficult or impossible, such as when students enter or exit a school bus in proximity to the bus driver, all individuals, including staff and students, should wear face coverings that cover the mouth and nose consistent with public health guidance. To be clear, face coverings are not a replacement for physical distancing, but they should be used to mitigate virus spread when physical distancing is not feasible.
    4. Student Physical Distancing . LEAs should plan to:
      1. Limit number of students physically reporting to school, if needed to maintain physical distancing.
        1. Determine student and staff capacity of each school meeting six-foot physical distancing objectives.
        2. Consider various strategies outlined in the Instructional Program Models in the guidance document, such as early/late start times and blended learning models.
      2. The CDC recommends virtual activities in lieu of field trips and intergroup events..
      3. Post signage and install barriers to direct traffic around campus.
      4. Buses
        1. Determine maximum capacity for students of each vehicle while meeting six-foot physical distancing objectives.
        2. Create a plan for seating based on maximum capacity determined above, and develop a plan for bus routes that accommodates the capacity limitations . Mark or block seats that must be left vacant . Sample seating options:
          1. Option 1: Seat one student to a bench on both sides of the bus, skipping every other row.
          2. Option 2: Seat one student to a bench, alternating rows on each side to create a zigzag pattern on the bus.
        3. Instruct students and parents to maintain six-foot distancing at bus stops and while loading and unloading.
        4. Seat students from the rear of the bus forward to prevent students from walking past each other. To prevent students from walking past one another, afternoon runs should be boarded based on the order in which students will be dropped off . (Students who get off first should board last and sit in the front.)
        5. Students and staff should wear face coverings at bus stops and on buses.
      5. Playgrounds/Outside Spaces/Athletics
        1. Increase supervision to ensure physical distancing.
        2. Physical education (PE) and intramural/interscholastic athletics should be limited to activities that do not involve physical contact with other students or equipment until advised otherwise by state/local public health officials.
      6. Classrooms
        1. Determine maximum capacity for students of each classroom while meeting six-foot physical distancing objectives.
        2. In accordance with CDC and CDPH guidance, ensure desks are a minimum of six feet apart and arrange desks in a way that minimizes face-to-face contact.
        3. If necessary, utilize other campus spaces for instructional activities (e.g., lecture halls, gyms, auditoriums, cafeterias, outdoors).
        4. If necessary, broadcast to other classrooms and students distance learning at home.
        5. Increase staffing to ensure physical distancing for younger students and students with special needs.
        6. Arrange developmentally appropriate activities for smaller group activities and rearrange furniture and play spaces to maintain separation, when possible.
        7. Address physical distancing objectives as students move between classrooms.
        8. Address potential issues from physical distancing rules that could result in unintended segregation of students with disabilities on campuses away from peers without disabilities.
      7. Food Service
        1. Consider strategies to limit physical interaction during meal preparation and meal service (e.g., serving meals in classrooms, increasing meal service access points, staggering cafeteria use).
        2. Suspend use of share tables and self-service buffets for food and condiments.
        3. Install physical barriers, such as sneeze guards and partitions, at point of sale and other areas where maintaining physical distance of six feet is difficult.
        4. With an approved National School Lunch Program waiver, offer meal delivery for students quarantined or in a home-based cohort.
        5. If providing meal service in classrooms, plan for cleaning and trash removal.
    5. Staff
      1. Develop a plan that ensures physical distancing among staff in their work environment to reduce spread of the virus that includes:
        1. Avoiding staff congregation in work environments, break rooms, staff rooms, and bathrooms.
        2. Avoiding grouping staff together for training or staff development. Consider conducting the training virtually or, if in-person, ensure distancing is maintained.
      2. Adjust staff schedules (through negotiations) to accommodate new student schedules and physical distancing strategies.
      3. In accordance with Cal/OSHA regulations and guidance, evaluate all workspaces to ensure that employees can maintain physical distancing to the extent possible.
        1. Where possible, rearrange workspaces to incorporate a minimum of six feet between employees and students.
        2. If physical distancing between workspaces or between employees and students and visitors is not possible, add physical barriers that cannot be moved to separate workspaces.

  8. Cleaning and Disinfecting. Plan to meet cleanliness and disinfecting standards in school facilities and vehicles.
    1. Overall Cleanliness Standards. Schools must meet high cleanliness standards prior to reopening and maintain a high level during the school year.
    2. In accordance with CDC guidance, avoid sharing of electronic devices, toys, books, and other games or learning aids.
    3. Limit stuffed animals and any other toys that are difficult to clean and sanitize.
    4. In accordance with CDC and California Department of Pesticide Regulation (CDPR) guidance, and in consultation with local public health officials, develop a plan that includes:
      1. A safe and correct application External link opens in new window or tab. (PDF) of disinfectants using personal protective equipment and ventilation recommended for cleaning.
      2. Disinfecting surfaces between uses, such as:
        1. Desks and tables
        2. Chairs
        3. Seats on bus
        4. Keyboards, phones, headsets, copy machines
      3. Disinfecting frequently—at least daily—high-touch surfaces, such as:
        1. Door handles
        2. Handraills
        3. Drinking fountains
        4. Sink handles
        5. Restroom surfaces
        6. Toys, games, art supplies, instructional materials
        7. Playground equipment
      4. When choosing disinfecting products, using those approved for use against COVID-19 on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) List N: Disinfectants for Use Against SARS-CoV-2 External link opens in new window or tab. and follow product instructions.
        1. To reduce the risk of asthma related to disinfecting, programs should aim to select disinfectant products on the EPA List N with asthma-safer ingredients (hydrogen peroxide, citric acid, or lactic acid).
        2. Avoid products that mix these ingredients with peroxyacetic acid, sodium hypochlorite (bleach), or quaternary ammonium compounds, which can cause asthma.
        3. Use disinfectants labeled to be effective against emerging viral pathogens, following label directions for appropriate dilution rates and contact times.
      5. When cleaning, airing out the space before children arrive . Plan to do thorough cleaning when children are not present.
      6. Closing off areas used by any sick person and not using before cleaning and disinfection . To reduce risk of exposure, wait 24 hours before cleaning and disinfecting . If it is not possible to wait 24 hours, wait as long as possible.
    5. Make a Plan for Adequate Outdoor Air Circulation
      1. In accordance with CDC guidance, ensure that ventilation systems and fans operate properly and increase circulation of outdoor air as much as possible by opening windows and doors and other methods. Do not open windows and doors if doing so poses a safety or health risk to children using the facility (for example, allowing pollen in or exacerbating asthma symptoms). Maximize central air filtration for heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems (targeted filter rating of at least MERV 13).
    6. Take steps to ensure that all water systems and features (e .g., drinking fountains, decorative fountains) are safe to use after a prolonged facility shutdown to minimize the risk of Legionnaires’ disease and other diseases associated with water. See Guidance for Reopening Buildings After Prolonged Shutdown or Reduced Operation External link opens in new window or tab..
    7. Keep each child’s belongings separated and in an individually labeled storage container, cubby, or area. Send belongings home each day to be cleaned.

  9. Employee Issues. Engage employees on COVID-19 plans and provide necessary training and accommodations.
    1. Revisit existing bargaining agreement.
      1. Engage the exclusive representatives of labor groups and work collaboratively in tailoring bargaining agreements to address the relevant employee issues in this checklist. Ideally, these are matters that would be resolved as part of the reopening planning process and prior to school starting so as to provide clarity for reopening.
      2. Create a plan for future bargaining that may be necessary as additional issues arise.
    2. Staffing Ratios
      1. Ensure staffing levels are sufficient to meet unique facility cleanliness, physical distancing, student learning, and health and safety needs to address COVID-19.
      2. Consider rolling staff cohorts to meet needs and avoid overwork.
    3. Develop and provide staff training or utilize state-provided training on:
      1. Disinfecting frequency and tools and chemicals used in accordance with the Healthy Schools Act External link opens in new window or tab. (PDF), CDPR guidance External link opens in new window or tab. , and Cal/OSHA regulations. For staff who use hazardous chemicals for cleaning, specialized training is required.
      2. Physical distancing of staff and students.
      3. Symptom screening, including temperature checks.
      4. Updates to the Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP).
      5. State and local health standards and recommendations, including, but not limited to, the following:
        1. Proper use of protective equipment, including information on limitations of some face coverings that do not protect the wearer and are not PPE but can help protect people near the wearer . Face coverings do not replace the need for physical distancing and frequent handwashing. Cloth face coverings are most essential when physical distancing is not possible. Also include training on removal and washing of cloth face coverings.
        2. Cough and sneeze etiquette.
        3. Keeping one’s hands away from one’s face.
        4. Frequent handwashing and proper technique.
        5. Confidentiality around health recording and reporting.
      6. Training for school health staff on clinical manifestations of COVID-19, pediatric presentations, and CDC transmission-based precautions External link opens in new window or tab..
      7. Training on trauma-informed practices and suicide prevention.
    4. Designate a staff liaison or liaisons to be responsible for responding to COVID-19 concerns. Employees should know who they are and how to contact them.
    5. Reasonable Accommodations
      1. Protect and support staff who are at higher risk for severe illness (medical conditions that the CDC says may have increased risks External link opens in new window or tab. ) or who cannot safely distance from household contacts at higher risk by providing options such as telework or negotiated change in classification or duties.
      2. If reasonable accommodations are not practicable, the LEA should work with the employee to develop a flexible leave plan that endeavors to avoid exhausting the employee’s earned leave.
  10. Communication with Students, Parents, Employees, Public Health Officials, and the Community
    1. School leaders should engage stakeholders, including families, staff, and labor partners in the school community, to formulate and implement the plans in this checklist.
    2. Communicate to staff, students, and parents about new, COVID-19-related protocols, including:
      1. Proper use of PPE/EPG.
      2. Cleanliness and disinfection.
      3. Transmission prevention.
      4. Guidelines for families about when to keep students home from school.
      5. Systems for self-reporting symptoms.
      6. Criteria and plan to close schools again for physical attendance of students.
    3. Target communication for vulnerable members of the school community.
    4. Create a communications plan for if a school has a positive COVID-19 case.
      1. Address the school’s role in documenting, reporting, tracking, and tracing infections in coordination with public health officials.
      2. Notify staff and families immediately of any possible cases of COVID-19 . Review legal responsibilities and privacy rights for communicating about cases of the virus.
      3. Provide guidance to parents, teachers, and staff reminding them of the importance of community physical distancing measures while a school is closed, including discouraging students or staff from gathering elsewhere.
      4. Provide information to parents regarding labor laws, Disability Insurance, Paid Family Leave, and Unemployment Insurance.
      5. Advise sick staff members and children not to return until they have met CDC criteria to discontinue home isolation External link opens in new window or tab..
      6. Inform those who have had close contact External link opens in new window or tab. with a person diagnosed with COVID-19 to stay home and self-monitor for symptoms and to follow CDC guidance External link opens in new window or tab. if symptoms develop. If a person does not have symptoms follow appropriate CDC guidance for home isolation External link opens in new window or tab..

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Questions:   California Department of Education | COVID19@cde.ca.gov
Last Reviewed: Monday, June 8, 2020
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