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Transcript: Using the USDA Food Buying Guide

Text transcript of the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Meal Pattern Compliance-Part Two: Using the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Online Food Buying Guide (FBG) course.

The Nutrition Services Division is providing a text transcript of the CACFP Meal Pattern Compliance-Part Two: Using the USDA Online FBG course, which is available as a video file by accessing the 2020-21 CACFP Mandatory Training.

Slide 1: Introduction

Welcome to the California Department of Education online course, Child and Adult Care Food Program Meal Pattern Compliance, Part Two–Using the U.S. Department of Agriculture Online Food Buying Guide, course number 459, recorded in October 2020.

My name is Courtney Hardoin, and I am a Nutrition Education Consultant in the Nutrition Services Division.

Slide 2: Acronyms and Abbreviations

I will use several acronyms and abbreviations throughout this training. They are as follows:

  • Administrative Review: AR
  • California Department of Education: CDE
  • Child and Adult Care Food Program: CACFP
  • Child Nutrition Information and Payment System: CNIPS
  • Child Nutrition Label: CN Label
  • Food Buying Guide: FBG
  • Gram: gr
  • Meats/meat alternates: M/MA
  • Ounce equivalents: oz eq
  • Pound: lb
  • Product formulation statement: PFS
  • Recipe Analysis Workbook: RAW, and
  • U.S. Department of Agriculture: USDA

Slide 3: Purpose of the Online Course

The purpose of this online course, which is the second course of the two-part CACFP Meal Pattern Compliance series, is to help CACFP Operators determine crediting of foods and how much food to purchase. This online course provides extensive and very detailed information on crediting foods to the meal patterns, determining how much food to purchase, and using the Food Buying Guide online tools.

Our expectation after viewing this course is not for CACFP Operators to retain everything included in this course; rather, this online course was developed as a resource that CACFP Operators can revisit to determine how to credit the variety of food items they serve and how to calculate how much food to purchase.

Slide 4: Training Objectives

The training objectives of this online course are for CACFP Operators to:

  1. Understand the purpose of the Food Buying Guide;

  2. Learn how to use the online Food Buying Guide to determine crediting for food items and recipes;

  3. Understand how to use the online Food Buying Guide to calculate the amount of foods to purchase to provide the minimum serving sizes required; and,

  4. Recognize what documentation must be maintained to demonstrate CACFP meal pattern compliance.

Slide 5: Training Objective 1

The first training objective in this online course is to understand the purpose of the Food Buying Guide.

Slide 6: Questions to Ask Yourself…

Whether you are serving food to a small number of children or adults, or hundreds of participants, you need to ask yourself these questions:

  • Will the meal or snack meet the requirements of the CACFP?

  • What quantity of the raw product is needed to provide the amount of ready-to-cook food that is called for in a recipe?

  • How many servings will you get from a specific quantity of food? And,

  • How much food will you need to buy?

The purpose of the Food Buying Guide is to help CACFP Operators answer all these questions and more!

Slide 7: FBG Features

This slide shares some of the Food Buying Guide features.

The Food Buying Guide contains crediting information for over 2,100 food items, such as fruits, vegetables, grains, meats, and meat alternates. While the Crediting Handbook for CACFP Operators is a helpful resource, the Food Buying Guide is the CACFP Operator’s primary resource to determine whether a food is creditable, how to credit food items to the meal patterns, and how much of a food item to purchase in order to provide the minimum serving size required for the number of participants served.

The Food Buying Guide is available on many platforms. CACFP Operators can access the Food Buying Guide as an interactive online version, as a printable PDF in the online version, and through a mobile app. A link to the online Food Buying Guide, and all other resources mentioned throughout this online course, are accessible in the Referenced Resources section, which is adjacent to this online course when your screen is minimized.

Slide 8: USDA eAuthentication Account

Before using the online or mobile Food Buying Guide, CACFP Operators who are first-time users should create a USDA eAuthentication account. This enables the user to access all features in the online Food Buying Guide, save data, and access saved data using both the online and mobile app versions. The eAuthentication Account is accessible on the Food Buying Guide log-in screen.

Slide 9: Test Your Knowledge–Question #1

It is time to test what you have learned with question number one!

Question: Which of the following is the primary resource to determine the contribution that foods make toward the meal pattern requirements?

  1. The Crediting Handbook. Or,
  2. The Food Buying Guide

Slide 10: Test Your Knowledge–Answer #1

The correct answer is b. The Food Buying Guide is the primary resource to determine the contribution that foods make toward the meal pattern requirements.

While the Crediting Handbook is a helpful resource to determine whether many food items are creditable, it does not include all creditable food items.

The Food Buying Guide contains crediting information for over 2,100 food items and is the primary resource to determine whether a food is creditable, how to credit food items to the meal patterns, and how much of a food item to purchase in order to provide the minimum serving size required for the number of participants served.

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Slide 11: Training Objective 2

The second training objective in this online course is to learn how to use the online Food Buying Guide to determine crediting for food items and recipes.

Slide 12: Yield Tables

The yield tables are a major component of the Food Buying Guide. The data in the yield tables can help CACFP Operators in a variety of ways as they plan menus, make purchasing decisions, and check to make sure that meals meet the CACFP meal pattern requirements. There is a yield table for each component that includes crediting information for food items. Food items are listed in alphabetical order, within each component. Unlike the Crediting Handbook for CACFP Operators, only creditable food items are listed in the yield tables for each of the food components. However, there is also a yield table titled, Other Foods, that includes noncreditable foods that CACFP Operators may purchase to use as additional foods, condiments, or seasonings to increase menu appeal and improve acceptability of foods.

Slide 13: Examples of Food Items in Yield Tables

Examples of creditable food items included in the yield tables are:

  • Fresh strawberries
  • Frozen broccoli
  • Canned beans
  • Orange juice
  • Ground beef
  • Swiss cheese
  • Chicken breast
  • Eggs
  • Yogurt
  • Bread
  • Cereal, and,
  • Pasta

Slide 14: Commercially Processed Foods in the FBG

This slide provides an overview of commercially processed foods in the Food Buying Guide.

The Food Buying Guide yield tables also include crediting information for several standard commercially processed foods that include additional ingredients that are eaten as part of the food, and not drained before eating which is done for foods such as vegetables canned in water and fruit canned in fruit juice. These foods are included in the Food Buying Guide because they meet USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service standards that require a minimum percent of the meat/meat alternate component in the food. For example, the Food Buying Guide includes crediting information for:

  • Beef stew
  • Beans baked in sauce, vegetarian
  • Chicken chili, and,
  • Turkey with dumplings

Slide 15: Determine Crediting for Foods in Yield Tables

To determine how a food credits to the meal patterns for food items included in the yield tables, select the Food Items Search tab on the home screen of the online Food Buying Guide, as shown in the image on this slide. After selected, a Search Food Items table opens.

Slide 16: FBG Food Items Search Table

In the Food Buying Guide Food Items Search table, CACFP Operators will enter information into three fields.

The first field is the Keywords field, where CACFP Operators will enter one or more words describing the food. For example, “apples”, “fresh apples”, or “frozen apples”. Typing a descriptive word such as “fresh” or “frozen” will decrease the amount of search results for apples.

There are two optional fields in the Search table where CACFP Operators can narrow the search results:

  • Meal Component gives the option to select the food component from a drop-down list. For example, Fruits; and,

  • Category gives the option to select the category of the food item from a drop-down list. For example, the fruits component only has one category: Fruit and Fruit Juice; however, for the Meats/Meat Alternates component, there are 10 categories. For example, one category is Cheese, Eggs, Yogurt.

After completing the information in the Food Items Search Table, select Search and a Search Results table appears.

Slide 17: Key Columns of Information for Food Items in Search Results Yield Tables

There are four key columns of information for food items in the Search Results yield table that will appear after a search:

  1. Food As Purchased, AP
  2. Purchase Unit
  3. Servings per Purchase Unit, EP (which is the Edible Portion), and,
  4. Serving Size per Meal Contribution

CACFP Operators can review the information in each column to determine which food item that they want to serve from the search results and how that food credits to the meal pattern.

Slide 18: Column 1–Food As Purchased, AP

The first piece of information in the yield table in column one is the Food As Purchased, AP.

The Food as Purchased column includes the name of the food item and the form(s) in which it is purchased. For example, some of the listings for apples in the Food as Purchased column include:

  • Apples, fresh, 125–138 count whole
  • Apples, fresh, 100 count
  • Apples, frozen, unsweetened, and
  • Applesauce, canned, smooth or chunky

Slide 19: Commercially Processed Foods in the FBG

For commercially processed foods listed in the Food Buying Guide, like beef stew and chicken chili, the name in the Food As Purchased column must exactly match the name of the food listed on the product label in order to use the crediting information listed in the Food Buying Guide. For example, the image on the slide shows a canned food labeled chicken chili with beans. In the Food As Purchased column for chicken products in the Food Buying Guide, there is a listing for Chicken Products, Chicken Chili with Beans. Because the name on the canned food label exactly matches the name of the food item in the Food Buying Guide, this can of chicken chili can be credited toward the meal patterns.

Slide 20: Column 2–Purchase Unit

The second piece of information in the yield table is column two, the Purchase Unit column. This column specifies the basic unit of purchase for the food.

For most foods, the Food Buying Guide lists Pound as the purchase unit, such as for fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, and raw meat. For some processed foods, the Food Buying Guide lists an institutional pack, such as for canned beans. For example, the purchase unit column includes information on two can sizes for refried beans: A Number 10 can (115 ounces) and a Number 300 can (16 ounces.)

Slide 21: Column 3–Servings per Purchase Unit, EP

The third piece of information in the yield table is column three, the Servings per Purchase Unit, EP (which again, means Edible Portion).

This column shows the number of servings that are provided from each purchase unit. For example, in the Food Buying Guide yield table, the Servings per Purchase Unit column for one pound of 125-138 count apples lists that there are 14.80 servings. This means there are 14.80 servings per pound of 125-138 count fresh, whole apples.

Slide 22: Column 4–Serving Size per Meal Contribution

The fourth piece of information in the yield table is column four, the Serving Size per Meal Contribution column. This column lists the serving size that can be credited toward meeting the meal pattern requirements.

For example, in the Food Buying Guide yield table, the Serving Size per Meal Contribution column lists one-quarter-cup servings of raw, unpeeled fruit for the 125-138 count apples in this example.

This fourth and final column gives us the whole picture: One pound of 125-138 count fresh, whole apples yields 14.80 one-quarter-cup servings of raw, unpeeled fruit.

That concludes the instructions for how to use the yield tables for food items listed in the Food Buying Guide to determine how a food item credits toward the meal pattern.

Slide 23: Crediting Commercially Processed Foods Not in the FBG

This slide provides an overview of crediting commercially processed foods that are not listed in the Food Buying Guide.

As I mentioned, the Food Buying Guide only includes a few standard commercially processed foods that include additional ingredients, such as chicken chili with beans. For example, the Food Buying Guide does not contain crediting information for:

  • Commercially processed combination food products that credit toward more than one meal component, such as pizza, lasagna, and chicken nuggets; or,

  • Food items that contain ingredients such as byproducts, cereals, binders, and extenders, such as beef and veggie patties and lunch meat.

To credit these food products to the meal pattern, CACFP Operators must obtain a CN Label or a manufacturer’s product formulation statement.

Slide 24: CN Labels and PFS

This slide provides an overview of CN Labels and product formulation statements.

CN Labels may be included on the product’s packaging if the manufacturer opted into the CN Labeling Program. CN Labels are issued by the USDA and provide assurance that the food provides the stated contributions toward meal pattern requirements. They are only issued for entrée dishes that contribute to the meats/meat alternates component.

Product formulation statements must be obtained from the food manufacturer by the CACFP Operator. Product formulation statements are a signed certified document that allows manufacturers to demonstrate how a product contributes to the meal pattern requirements. A product formulation statement is typically provided for processed products that do not have a CN Label.

Slide 25: CN Labels and PFS–Single Component M/MA Foods

This slide provides an overview of using CN Labels and product formulation statements to credit single component meat/meat alternate foods.

There are many meat and meat alternate food items that are not in the Food Buying Guide because they contain byproducts, cereals, binders, or extenders that are not creditable.

Due to the addition of these ingredients, the weight of one serving includes the weight of the added ingredients. Therefore, the product’s packaging must either include a CN Label or the CACFP Operator must obtain a product formulation statement from the food manufacturer to determine the actual amount of meat/meat alternate in a serving that does not include the additional ingredients added to the product that are not creditable to the meal pattern.

For example, turkey lunch meat is a commercially processed food that contributes to the meat/meat alternate component. It is not listed in the Food Buying Guide because lunch meat often includes other ingredients. Frequently these products contain water-based flavoring solutions to enhance the taste such as honey-roasted or mesquite-smoked flavoring solutions. These solutions add non-protein weight to the product and dilute the amount of protein per serving.

Slide 26: CN Labels and PFS–Combination Foods

This slide provides an overview of using CN Labels and product formulation statements to credit combination foods.

Commercially prepared combination foods that contribute to multiple components are also not listed in the Food Buying Guide because there is no standard size – chicken nuggets, burritos, and pizzas come in all sizes with varying ratios of components.

Therefore, the product’s packaging must either include a CN Label or the CACFP Operator must obtain a product formulation statement from the food manufacturer that shows how the creditable amount for each component in one serving size was determined.

For example, frozen cheese pizza is a commercially processed combination food not listed in the Food Buying Guide. The cheese credits toward the meat/meat alternate component, the crust credits toward the grain component, and the pizza sauce credits toward the vegetable component. A CN Label or product formulation statement would detail how much each ingredient contributes to each component.

Slide 27: Test Your Knowledge–Question #2

It is time to test what you have learned with question number two!

Question: What information is not provided in the yield tables of the Food Buying Guide?

  1. The purchase unit of the food. For example, pound, pint, or Number 10 can.
  2. The cost per purchase unit of the food. For example, $2.00 per pound.
  3. The number of servings provided per purchase unit. For example, six servings per pound.
  4. The serving size per meal contribution. For example, one-quarter cup raw fruit.

Slide 28: Test Your Knowledge–Answer #2

The correct answer is b. The cost per purchase unit of the food. For example, $2.00 per pound.

The yield tables do not provide the cost per purchase unit of the food. The CACFP Operator will need to determine the cost per purchase unit in other ways, such as by comparing prices at the store or referencing a distributor’s pricing list.

Slide 29: Test Your Knowledge–Question #3

Question number three: True or False–All commercially prepared foods with additional ingredients require a CN Label or a PFS?

  1. True
  2. False

Slide 30: Test Your Knowledge–Answer #3

The correct answer is b. False.

The Food Buying Guide includes information for several standard commercially processed foods that include additional ingredients, such as beef stew and chicken chili with beans, and therefore do not require a CN Label or a product formulation statement. Crediting for these products can be obtained in the yield tables of the Food Buying Guide. However, if the product name on a commercially processed food does not exactly match the name in the As Purchased column of the Food Buying Guide or the food item is not in the yield tables at all, such as with pizza, burritos, and chicken nuggets, then CACFP Operators need a CN Label or a product formulation statement to credit the product.

A link to the USDA Food Manufacturers/Industry web page includes more information on CN Labels and product formulation statements and is accessible in the Referenced Resources section.

Slide 31: Crediting Commercially Prepared Grain Products Using the Online FBG Exhibit A Grains Tool

This next section addresses how to credit commercially prepared grain products using the online Food Buying Guide Exhibit A Grain Tool.

Slide 32: Commercially Prepared Grain Products

Some commercially prepared standard grain products that include a Nutrition Facts label, such as rice and pasta, are listed in the Food Buying Guide and the yield tables can be used to determine crediting.

However, many commercially prepared grain products, such as frozen waffles and tortillas, are not listed in the Food Buying Guide because these items are not available as a regulated standard size, like pound or 10 can. For example, one serving of frozen waffles from Brand A weighs 70 grams and one serving of frozen waffles from Brand B weighs 93 grams.

Because these grain items are not available as a regulated standard size, these grain products are instead listed in the USDA Exhibit A Grain Requirements for Child Nutrition Programs table, referred to as simply Exhibit A Grains table throughout this online course. The Exhibit A Grains table is listed in Appendix E of the Food Buying Guide and a link to the table is included in the Referenced Resources section.

Slide 33: Exhibit A Grains Tool

The USDA created the Food Buying Guide Exhibit A Grains Tool, based on the Exhibit A Grains table, to help CACFP Operators calculate the contribution to the meal pattern for commercially prepared grain products with a Nutrition Facts label on the product packaging, since crediting for many grain products is not available in the Food Buying Guide yield tables.

To demonstrate how this tool works, I will review the steps that a CACFP Operator would take using the online Food Buying Guide Exhibit A Grains Tool to determine how many crackers they need to serve to provide the minimum serving size required for the grains component at meals and snacks.

Slide 34: Step 1–Exhibit A Grains Tool

In step one of the Exhibit A Grains Tool, select the Exhibit A Grains Tool tab on the Food Buying Guide home screen, as shown in the image on this slide.

Slide 35: Step 2–Exhibit A Grains Tool

In step two of the Exhibit A Grains Tool, select Enter Exhibit A Product on the Exhibit A Grains Tool–My Products screen, as shown on the image on the slide from the Food Buying Guide Exhibit A Grains Tool.

Slide 36: Step 3–Exhibit A Grains Tool

In step three of the Exhibit A Grains Tool, in the Product Name field, enter the product name. For example, Yummy Tummy Crackers, as shown on the image on the slide from the Food Buying Guide Exhibit A Grains Tool.

Slide 37: Step 4–Exhibit A Grains Tool

In step four of the Exhibit A Grains Tool, in the Choose Method row, select Ounce Equivalent Grains, as shown on the image on the slide from the Food Buying Guide Exhibit A Grains Tool.

Slide 38: Step 5–Exhibit A Grains Tool

In step five of the Exhibit A Grains Tool, complete the Item keywords field, which includes a text box to enter the name of the grain product next to the Item Keywords, an active link to the Exhibit A Grains table and a Search feature, as shown in the image on this slide from the Exhibit A Grains Tool.

First, enter the name of the grain product as it appears in the Exhibit A Grains table (such as cracker, waffle, or cereal) in the Item keywords field.

For example, enter crackers in the Item keywords field.

To access the list of grain product names in the Exhibit A Grains table, select the hyperlink, Exhibit A.

Select Search.

Slide 39: Step 6–Exhibit A Grains Tool

In step six of the Exhibit A Grains Tool, after selecting Search, all food items in the Exhibit A Grains table with the keywords, in this case crackers, will open in a table on the screen, as shown in the image on this slide from the Exhibit A Grains tool. The table includes two columns, titled Action and Item Name

For example, when the word, crackers, is entered in the Item keywords field, two entries are listed in the table in the Item Name column:

  • Savory crackers (saltines and snack crackers), and
  • Sweet crackers (graham crackers–all shapes, animal crackers).

In the Action column of the search results table, select Add next to the correct grain product. For example, select Add in the Action column next to Savory Crackers.

Slide 40: Step 7–Exhibit A Grains Tool

In step seven of the Exhibit A Grains Tool, after selecting Add next to the desired grain product, the product is listed in a separate table on the screen, as shown on the image on the slide from the Food Buying Guide Exhibit A Grains Tool.

For example, Savory Crackers (saltines and snack crackers) are listed in the Description of Food Item per Exhibit A column, as shown in the image on this slide.

There are three tabs in this table, as the image on the slide shows: Grains Contribution, Amount to Serve, and Amount to Serve by Age Group/Grade Group.

Select the Amount to Serve by Age Group/Grade Group tab to enter serving size information for the grain product.

Slide 41: Step 8–Exhibit A Grains Tool

In step eight of the Exhibit A Grains Tool complete the information in the Amount to Serve by Age Group/Grade Group tab. As shown in the image on this slide from the Exhibit A Grains Tool, this tab includes three columns: Description of Food Item per Exhibit A (which includes the Savory Crackers [saltines and snack crackers] that were added to this tab in the previous step), Serving Size (as provided on product label) (which includes text boxes and drop-down lists for the Serving Size and weight fields, and Program–Meal (which includes drop-down lists for program and meal types).

In the Serving Size (as provided on the Product Label) column:

  • Enter the serving size for one serving of the product in the Serving Size field. To do this, refer to the Nutrition Facts label on the product. For example, the serving size listed on a box of crackers is five crackers. The image on the slide shows that five is entered as the Serving Size in this column.

  • The drop-down list adjacent to the Serving Size field has options that pertain to the food item, for example, the choice for Savory Crackers in the drop-down list are piece(s)/slice(s), serving(s), or single serve package(s). For the crackers, I selected piece(s)/slice(s) from the drop-down list, as shown on the image on this slide.

  • In the adjacent blank field and drop-down list, enter the weight of one serving. To do this, refer to the Nutrition Facts label on the product. For example, the image on this slide shows the weight of the serving size listed on the box of crackers is 16 grams for five crackers.

In the Program–Meal column, select the meal or snack served in the CACFP from the drop-down list. For example, I selected CACFP–Snack from the drop-down list, as shown in the image on this slide.

Slide 42: Step 9–Exhibit A Grains Tool

In step nine of the Exhibit A Grains Tool, an Amount to Serve by Age Group/Grade Group to Meet the Minimum Grains Requirement table for the program and meal or snack selected in Step eight, will open with three columns, as shown on the image on the slide from the Food Buying Guide Exhibit A Grains Tool. The three columns are:

  • Age Group/Grade Group,
  • Amount to Serve to Meet Minimum Grains Requirement, and
  • Minimum Grains Requirement.

In this example, the table shows that:

  • Age groups 1–2 and 3–5 need 3.5 pieces (or crackers), which would round up to four crackers, to meet the required one-half-ounce equivalent grains serving at snack; and,

  • Ages 6–12, 13–18, and Adults need seven pieces (or crackers) to meet the required 1.0-ounce equivalent grains serving at snack.

Slide 43: Test Your Knowledge–Question #4

It is time to test what you have learned with question number four!

Question: Which statement is true?

  1. All grain products are listed in the Food Buying Guide yield tables.

  2. No grain products are listed in the Food Buying Guide yield tables.

  3. A grain product must have a Nutrition Facts label to use the Food Buying Guide Exhibit A Grains Tool. Or,

  4. A grain product does not need the Nutrition Facts label to use the Food Buying Guide Exhibit A Grains Tool.

Slide 44: Test Your Knowledge–Answer #4

The correct answer is c. A grain product must have a Nutrition Facts label to use the Food Buying Guide Exhibit A Grains Tool.

If a grain product does not have a Nutrition Facts label, CACFP Operators can use either the Exhibit A Grains table, which includes crediting information for many grain products, or the Food Buying Guide if the grain food item is listed in the yield tables, such as rice or pasta purchased by the pound.

Slide 45: Crediting Grain Recipes and Products Using the FBG Exhibit A Grains Table

This next section provides guidance on crediting grain recipes and products using the Food Buying Guide Exhibit A Grains Table for grain products that do not include a Nutrition Facts label and are not in the Food Buying Guide yield tables.

Slide 46: Exhibit A Grains Table–Crediting Grain Products

Using the Exhibit A Grains Table to credit grain products is quick and easy to do!

The Exhibit A Grains table can be used to determine how much one serving of a homemade or commercially prepared grain product contributes to the meal pattern. To demonstrate how this works, I will review the simple steps a CACFP Operator would take using the Exhibit A Grains table to determine how much one homemade muffin or commercially prepared muffin contributes to the meal pattern in grain ounce equivalents.

Slide 47: Step 1: Crediting Grain Products Using Exhibit A Grains Table

In step 1 of crediting grain products using the Exhibit A Grains table, weigh the grain product on a scale to determine the weight in grams. For example, a muffin weighs 32 grams.

Slide 48: Step 2: Crediting Grain Products Using Exhibit A Grains Table

In step two of crediting grain products using the Exhibit A Grains table, compare the weight of one serving of the grain product to the amounts listed in the Exhibit A Grains table for that type of product. For example, the image on this slide from the Exhibit A Grains table shows a two-column table with Group D as the first column and Ounce Equivalents for Group D as the second column.

Muffins (all, except corn) are included in the cell below the Group D column. The following information is included in the cell below the Ounce Equivalents for Group D column:

  • 1 ounce equivalent equals 55 grams or 2.0 ounces,
  • three-quarter ounce equivalents equals 42 grams or 1.5 ounces,
  • one-half ounce equivalents equals 28 grams or 1.0 ounce, and,
  • one-quarter ounce equivalents equals 14 grams or 0.5 ounces.

The muffin in our example weighs 32 grams; therefore, it does not weigh enough to credit as three-quarter ounce equivalents and weighs slightly more than required to credit as one-half ounce equivalents, as shown by the arrow on this slide. Therefore, the 32-gram muffin, whether homemade or purchased commercially, will credit as one-half ounce equivalent.

Slide 49: Crediting Homemade Recipes Using the Online FBG RAW

To determine crediting for homemade recipes, including homemade grain recipes, the online Food Buying Guide includes the Recipe Analysis Workbook The next section will illustrate how to use this tool.

Slide 50: FBG RAW (1)

The Food Buying Guide Recipe Analysis Workbook can determine crediting for homemade recipes for both single component foods and multiple component foods. For example, a homemade gingered carrots recipe is a single component recipe because only the carrots contribute to the vegetables component. However, pizza is a multiple component recipe because typically the crust, cheese, and pizza sauce contribute to multiple components.

Slide 51: FBG RAW (2)

To demonstrate, I will provide step-by-step instructions for calculating the contribution to the meal pattern for a USDA Scrambled Eggs recipe that was developed for CACFP Operators.

The recipe includes the following three ingredients and amounts:

  • Whole eggs, frozen, thawed: Three pounds
  • Nonfat milk: Two cups, and,
  • Salt: one-quarter teaspoon

Slide 52: Step 1–RAW

Step one in the Recipe Analysis Workbook is to select the Recipe Analysis Workbook tab on the home screen of the Food Buying Guide, as shown in the image on this slide.
This will open a new Recipe Analysis Workbook screen.

Slide 53: Step 2–RAW

On the Recipe Analysis Workbook screen, step two is to select Create Recipe Analysis Workbook as shown in the image on this slide from the Recipe Analysis Workbook tool. A Create Recipe Analysis Workbook screen will open.

Slide 54: Step 3–RAW

Step three in the Recipe Analysis Workbook is to enter information into three required fields on the Food Buying Guide Create Recipe Analysis Workbook screen, as shown in the image on this slide:

  • Enter the name of the recipe in the Recipe Name field; for example, USDA Scrambled Eggs.

  • Enter the number of servings the recipe makes in the Servings per Recipe field; for example, 25.

  • Enter the serving size in the Serving Size field; for example, one-quarter cup, or a Number 16 scoop.
    There is an instructions tab above these three required fields that provides CACFP Operators with assistance in completing the information on the Create Recipe Analysis Workbook screen.

Slide 55: RAW Tabs (1)

There are also several Recipe Analysis Workbook tabs below the three required fields, as shown in the image on this slide from the Recipe Analysis Workbook tool.

The first tab is the Select Creditable Ingredient tab where ingredients in the recipe are searched for in the Food Buying Guide and then added to the Recipe Analysis Workbook.

The second tab is an optional Recipe Notes tab to enter notes about the recipe, such as the amount of time it takes to prepare the recipe.

The next three tabs include one for the vegetables, one for the fruits, and one for the meats/meat alternates components. Each of the component tabs includes ingredients added to the Recipe Analysis Workbook that are credited to that component. For example, the eggs added to the Recipe Analysis Workbook are listed in the Meats/Meat Alternates tab. If spinach were an ingredient in this recipe, the spinach would be listed in the Vegetables tab.

There is not a tab for the fluid milk component, because the only recipe that can credit fluid milk is smoothies. CACFP Operators cannot use the Recipe Analysis Workbook to credit smoothies; they must calculate crediting for smoothies manually.

Slide 56: RAW Tabs (2)

There are additional Recipe Analysis Workbook tabs.

As shown in the image on this slide from the Recipe Analysis Workbook tool, there are three tabs for the grains component. The reason for this is because not all grains are listed in the Food Buying Guide as previously discussed. For example, many grain products are listed in the Exhibit A Grains table instead of the Food Buying Guide, such as waffles and muffins. Grain ingredients are also not listed in the Food Buying Guide or the Exhibit A Grains table.

  • The first grains tab is Grains–Method A: This tab includes all grains listed in the Exhibit A Grains table that are not in the Food Buying Guide.

  • The second grains tab is Grains–Method B: This tab includes all grains listed in the Food Buying Guide.

  • The third grains tab is Grains–Method C: This tab includes an area to enter the name and the weight of grain ingredients in the recipe. For example, CACFP operators would enter, whole wheat in the description field and enter four ounces in the quantity field.

The final tab is a Meal Pattern Contribution tab, as shown in the image on this slide, where the crediting information for the recipe is listed once all ingredients and amounts are added to the Recipe Analysis Workbook.

Slide 57: Step 4–RAW

In Step four of the Recipe Analysis Workbook, select the Select Creditable Ingredient tab, to search for creditable ingredients to add to the recipe. A Search Food Ingredients table appears.

In the Search Food Ingredients table:

  • Enter the name of the creditable ingredient in the Keywords field; for example, whole eggs, frozen.

  • Select the meal component for the ingredient in the Meal Component drop-down list; for example, Meats/Meat Alternates.

  • Select the category of the ingredient in the Category drop-down list; for example, Cheese, Eggs, Yogurt.

Select Search and a Search Results Table will open on the screen with all the ingredients in the Food Buying Guide that match the search parameters.

Slide 58: Step 5–RAW

Step five in the Recipe Analysis Workbook is to first find the food item and purchase unit that matches the ingredient in the recipe and the weight or measurement of the ingredient in the recipe in the Search Results table, as shown in the image on this slide, and second select Add in the Add to RAW column. This will add the food item as an ingredient in the Recipe Analysis Workbook.

The image on this slide is the Search Results table from the Food Buying Guide Recipe Analysis Workbook. The image shows a three-column table with Food as Purchased as the heading of the first column, Purchase Unit as the heading of the second column, and Add to RAW, as the heading of the third column.

There are two food items in the Food As Purchased column of the Search Results table that match the search parameters. They are both the same food item, Eggs, Frozen, Whole Eggs; however, the weights in the Purchase Unit column are different. One is for a five-pound package and the other is 1 pound.

In the USDA Scrambled Eggs recipe, the amount of eggs to add is listed as three pounds. The Purchase Unit that most closely matches the amount of the ingredient listed in the recipe is 1 pound; therefore, select Add in the row for that ingredient and purchase unit.

If a recipe has more than one ingredient, repeat steps four and five until all ingredients are added to the Recipe Analysis Workbook; however, in this recipe, the only creditable ingredient is eggs because milk can only credit in recipes for smoothies and salt is not a creditable ingredient.

Slide 59: Step 6–RAW

Step six in the Recipe Analysis Workbook is to enter the amount of each ingredient to the Recipe Analysis Workbook once all ingredients are added for the recipe.

To do this, first select the component that the ingredient credits toward from the tabs listed in the Recipe Analysis Workbook screen. For example, eggs are a meat alternate so select the Meats/Meat Alternates tab, as shown in the image on this slide from the Recipe Analysis Workbook. A five-column table is listed in the tab with the following column headings: Food As Purchased, Purchase Unit, Quantity of Ingredient, Preparation Yield (if applicable), and Calculated Quantity to Purchase.

The Food As Purchased column includes the Eggs, Frozen Whole Eggs that were added in step five and the Purchase Unit column lists Pound.

Enter the quantity of the ingredient used in the recipe in the Quantity of Ingredient column. For example, the recipe for USDA Scrambled Eggs lists three pounds of whole eggs, frozen, thawed; therefore, I entered three in this column, as shown in the image on this slide, which is three pounds. If the Purchase Unit listed ounces instead of pounds, convert the ounces to pounds. For example, there are 16 ounces in a pound; therefore, if a recipe calls for eight ounces, that is 0.50 pounds and 0.50 would be entered in the Quantity of Ingredient column.

Once the three pounds are added, to the table, the Calculated Quantity to Purchase column lists 3.000, which is three pounds. So the Recipe Analysis Workbook also helps to determine how much to purchase in addition to crediting information.

This table also includes a Preparation Yield (if applicable) column, which lists zero. That is because the yield is 100 percent: three pounds of frozen whole eggs yields three pounds of frozen whole eggs.

Slide 60: Preparation Yield

Let’s talk a little more about the preparation yield column.

If the recipe called for peeled and cored apples and the CACFP Operator is purchasing whole apples that they plan to peel and core themselves, then one pound of whole apples would not yield one pound of peeled and cored apples. In this situation, the CACFP Operator would need to factor in the yield resulting after peeling and coring the apples.

To determine the yield, select the name of the food in the Food As Purchased column; every food item name is an active link that, when selected, provides additional information about the yield for that food item. The additional information for whole apples lists that 1 pound of whole apples yields 0.91 pounds when the apples are cored and peeled. 0.91 would be entered in the Preparation Yield column.

Slide 61: Step 7–RAW

Step seven in the Recipe Analysis Workbook is to select the Meal Pattern Contribution tab to view the crediting statement for the recipe.

The image on this slide from the Recipe Analysis Workbook tool, shows the Meal Pattern Contribution tab and the information contained within the tab. The tab includes crediting information for each component for one serving of the product. In this example, the information included in the tab is Meats/Meat Alternates, 2.00 ounce equivalents.

Below the crediting information for each component, details on the serving size that must be served to provide the stated contribution is listed within this tab. In this example, the image on this slide from the Meal Pattern Contribution tab of the Recipe Analysis Workbook shows that one-quarter-cup (which is a Number 16 scoop) of the USDA Scrambled Eggs recipe provides two ounce equivalents of meats/meat alternates to the meal pattern.

Select Save, which is located below the Meal Pattern Contribution information, as shown in the image on this slide from the Recipe Analysis Workbook, to save the recipe and crediting statement. There is also an option to print the contribution statement to provide to your CDE reviewer during an AR.

Slide 62: Using Hand Calculations to Credit Recipes

Using hand calculations to credit recipes is an alternative method to determine the meal pattern contributions of recipes. The slide lists some resources to help CACFP Operators who want to use hand calculations. Appendix A of the Food Buying Guide contains a Recipe Analysis Workbook template to assist with hand calculations. The USDA Crediting Handbook for CACFP Operators includes a Crediting in Action Section that provides step-by-step guidance on crediting recipes. The CDE Crediting Grains Using Ounce Equivalencies web page provides CACFP Operators with step-by-step guidance on crediting recipes containing grain ingredients and grain products.

Links to these resources are accessible in the Referenced Resources section.

Slide 63: Test Your Knowledge–Question #5

It is time to test what you have learned with question number five!

Question: The Recipe Analysis Workbook can be used to determine crediting for which of the following? Select all that apply.

  1. Homemade macaroni and cheese
  2. Homemade chicken fajitas
  3. Homemade smoothies made with fluid milk, or,
  4. All the above

Slide 64: Test Your Knowledge–Answer #5

The correct answers are a. Homemade macaroni and cheese and b. Homemade chicken fajitas.

The Recipe Analysis Workbook does not include a tab for the fluid milk component; therefore, CACFP Operators cannot use the Recipe Analysis Workbook to credit smoothies. Crediting for homemade smoothies is calculated manually.

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Slide 65: Training Objective 3

The third training objective in this online course is to understand how to use the online Food Buying Guide to calculate the amount of food to purchase to provide the minimum serving sizes required.

The information we just covered in the last section was just how to credit items to the meal pattern. But CACFP Operators also need to know how much to purchase.

Slide 66: Calculating Amount of Food Items to Purchase for Foods Listed in the FBG Yield Tables Using the FBG Calculator Tool

To calculate the amount of food items to purchase for a meal or snack for food items listed in the Food Buying Guide yield tables, CACFP can use the Food Buying Guide Calculator tool.

Slide 67: FBG Calculator Tool

The Food Buying Guide Calculator tool allows CACFP Operators to determine how much food to purchase to serve each age group the minimum serving size for a meal or snack.

It is important to note that this tool can only be used for food items listed in the Food Buying Guide yield tables. It cannot be used to determine how much to purchase for homemade recipes, such as cornbread, or combination processed foods, such as pizza, since grain ingredients and combination processed food items are not included in the Food Buying Guide yield tables.

To demonstrate how this tool works, I will review the steps a CACFP Operator would take to determine how much ready-to-eat trimmed broccoli to purchase to serve the minimum serving size of one quarter cup of vegetables at lunch to 25 children ages 3–5.

Slide 68: Step 1–FBG Calculator Tool

Step one of the Food Buying Guide Calculator Tool is to select the Food Buying Guide Calculator tab on the Food Buying Guide home screen, as shown in the image on this slide. Then select Create Shopping List, as shown adjacent to the Food Buying Guide Calculator tab. A Food Buying Guide Calculator–Create Shopping List screen will open.

Slide 69: Step 3–FBG Calculator Tool

Step two of the Food Buying Guide Calculator Tool is to provide information in the Food Buying Guide Calculator-Create Shopping List table.

The image on this slide from the Food Buying Guide Calculator Tool shows the first piece of information in this table is the Shopping List Name. This example shows, Week of August 24, 2020. Next select the tab for the correct component below the Shopping List Name. In this example, I selected the Vegetables tab.

After the tab for the correct component is selected, enter the name of the food item in the Item keywords field. This example shows that I entered broccoli in this field.

Select Search, as shown in the image on this slide. A food items table will open with all the forms of broccoli in the Food Buying Guide.

Slide 70: Step 3–FBG Calculator Tool

Step three of the Food Buying Guide Calculator Tool is to find the form of the food in the food items table that matches what is being purchased and served. In this example, it is Broccoli, fresh, Florets, Trimmed, Ready-to-use.

The image on this slide from the Food Buying Guide Calculator Tool shows a table with two columns. One is titled Action and the other is titled Food as Purchased. In the Action column, select Add next to Broccoli, fresh, Florets, Trimmed, Ready-to-use in the Foods As Purchased column.

Selecting Add will add this form of broccoli to the Food Buying Guide Shopping List table.

Slide 71: Step 4–FBG Calculator Tool

In step four of the Food Buying Guide Calculator Tool, a seven-column shopping list table appears on the same screen, as shown in the image on this slide from the Food Buying Guide Calculator Tool. The columns include: Food Item Description, Purchase Unit, Number of Purchase Units on Hand, Number of Servings, Exact Quantity, Buy Purchase Units, and Action.

The Food Item Description column includes the form of broccoli selected: broccoli, fresh, florets, trimmed, ready-to-use, cut raw vegetable.

The Purchase Unit column lists Pound.

The Number of Purchase Units on Hand, Number of Servings, Exact Quantity, and Buy Purchase Units columns all list zero, since no data has been entered.

Select Add Serving Size in the Action column. A table opens on the same screen with columns to enter the serving size and number of servings data.

Slide 72: Step 5–FBG Calculator Tool

In step five of the Food Buying Guide Calculator Tool, CACFP Operators will complete the information in the table shown in the image on this slide from the Food Buying Guide Calculator Tool.

There are two columns in the table labeled Serving Size and Number of Servings:

  • Select the serving size from the drop-down list in the Serving Size column.
  • Enter the number of servings in the Number of Servings column.

The example in this image shows that I selected one quarter cup from drop-down list in the Serving Size column and entered 25 in the Number of Servings column.

Slide 73: Step 6–FBG Calculator Tool

In step six of the Food Buying Guide Calculator Tool, refer to the shopping list table, as shown in the image on this slide from the Food Buying Guide Calculator Tool. Several columns will auto-populate with the quantities of food to purchase based on what was entered in Step five.

The shopping list table in the image on this slide shows seven columns: Food Item Description, Purchase Unit, Number of Purchase Units on Hand, Number of Servings, Exact Quantity, Buy Purchase Units, and Action.

The Food Item Description column includes the form of broccoli selected: broccoli, fresh, florets, trimmed, ready-to-use, cut raw vegetable.

The Purchase Unit column lists Pound.

The Number of Purchase Units on Hand lists zero; however, if I had one pound of broccoli on hand, I would enter one in this cell and it would decrease the amount of broccoli I needed to purchase.

The Number of Servings column auto-populated with 25 (which is from the 25 one-quarter-cup servings of broccoli entered in step five).

The Exact Quantity column auto-populated with 0.8681 pounds (which is the exact number of pounds of broccoli to purchase).

And the Buy Purchase Units column auto-populated with 1.00 pound, which is 0.8681 from the Exact Quantity column rounded up to the nearest quarter-pound.

Therefore, 1 pound of broccoli must be purchased to provide 25 one-quarter-cup servings of broccoli.

Slide 74: FBG Calculator Tool–Add Serving Sizes and Foods

CACFP Operators can add additional serving sizes and foods using the Food Buying Guide Calculator Tool.

If another serving size was being served to a different age group, the CACFP Operator would select Add Serving Size in the Action column, as shown in the image on this slide, and repeat step five to add additional serving sizes and number of servings.

CACFP Operators who want to add additional foods should repeat steps two through six.

Slide 75: Step 7–FBG Calculator Tool

In step seven of the Food Buying Guide Calculator Tool, there are several options in the Food Buying Guide–My Shopping List screen:

  • Edit: Returns to the Food Buying Guide Calculator–Edit Shopping List screen,
  • Copy: Makes a copy of the shopping list,
  • Delete: Opens a dialog box to delete the shopping list,
  • PDF: Opens a printable PDF,
  • Text: Opens a printable Excel file that includes the amount of each food to purchase, and
  • Email: Opens a dialog box to email an attached PDF.

Slide 76: FBG Calculator Tool Resources

This slide provides an overview of Food Buying Guide Calculator Tool Resources.

The Help menu in the online Food Buying Guide includes training videos for additional guidance on using the Food Buying Guide tools.

In addition, the CDE Food Buying Guide Calculator web page includes instructions for creating an eAuthentication account and detailed step-by-step instructions for using both the online and mobile app versions of the Food Buying Guide Calculator tool.

A link to this CDE resource is accessible in the Referenced Resources section.

Slide 77: Test Your Knowledge–Question #6

It is time to test what you have learned with question number six!

Question: The Food Buying Guide Calculator tool can be used to calculate the amount of foods to purchase for which of the following?

  1. Fresh broccoli
  2. Frozen pizza
  3. Homemade cornbread
  4. All the above

Slide 78: Test Your Knowledge–Answer #6

The correct answer is a. Fresh broccoli.

The Food Buying Guide Calculator tool can only be used to calculate the amount of foods to purchase for food items listed in the Food Buying Guide yield tables.

Most commercially prepared grain products, such as tortillas, commercially prepared combination foods, such as pizza, and homemade grain products, such as cornbread, are not listed in the Food Buying Guide yield tables.

The amount of foods to purchase for homemade grain products can be determined by entering the ingredients in the Recipe Analysis Workbook and referencing the amount in the Calculated Quantity to Purchase column in the appropriate components tab or through manual calculations.

Slide 79: Calculating the Amount of Commercially Prepared Grain Products and Combination Foods to Purchase Using a Nutrition Facts Label

This next section provides guidance on how to calculate the amount of commercially prepared grain products and commercially prepared combination foods to purchase using a Nutrition Facts label that is provided on these types of products.

Slide 80: Using the Nutrition Facts Label

So why would a CACFP Operator need to use the Nutrition Facts label on a grain product to calculate how much of a grain product to purchase instead of using the Food Buying Guide Calculator?

As I mentioned, the Food Buying Guide Calculator tool can only be used for food items listed in the Food Buying Guide yield tables. Many commercially prepared grain products, such as muffins and waffles, and all commercially prepared combination foods, such as pizza and chicken nuggets, are not listed in the Food Buying Guide yield tables. However, these products have one thing in common: Because they are commercially prepared, they all include a Nutrition Facts label.

This next section will provide an overview on how to determine the amount of commercially prepared grain products and combination foods to purchase using the Nutrition Facts label.

Slide 81: Amount to Purchase–Commercial Grains and Combination Foods

To determine the amount to purchase of commercially prepared grain products and combination foods that have a Nutrition Facts label, CACFP Operators need to perform a few simple calculations.

To demonstrate the required calculations, I will review the steps a CACFP Operator would take to determine how many boxes of Yummy Tummy Crackers to purchase to provide a 1-ounce equivalent serving size, which was calculated previously as seven crackers, for 50 children ages 6–12 at snack.

Slide 82: Step 1–Amount to Purchase of Commercial Grain Products and Combination Foods

Step one in determining the amount to purchase of commercial grain products and combination foods is to refer to the Nutrition Facts label on the package to determine the serving size and number of servings in the package.

For example, the image on this slide shows a portion of a Nutrition Facts label on a package of crackers. The label shows five crackers weighing 16 grams for the Serving Size, and 36 for the servings per container.

Slide 83: Step 2–Amount to Purchase of Commercial Grain Products and Combination Foods

Step two in determining the amount to purchase of commercial grain products and combination foods is to determine the total amount of the product in one container.

To do this, multiply the serving size as listed on the Nutrition Facts label by the number of servings per container as listed on the Nutrition Facts label.

For example, multiply five crackers, the serving size on the Nutrition Facts label, by 36, the servings per container on the Nutrition Facts label. Five crackers per serving multiplied by 36 servings per container equals 180 crackers in one container.

Slide 84: Step 3–Amount to Purchase of Commercial Grain Products and Combination Foods

Step three in determining the amount to purchase of commercial grain products and combination foods is to determine the number of servings of the desired serving size in one container.

To do this, divide the total amount of the product in one container by the amount you need to serve to provide the desired contribution to the meal pattern. We already determined in the Exhibit A Grain tool demonstration earlier in this course that seven Yummy Tummy Crackers equals one ounce equivalent. Next, round down to the nearest whole number.

For example, divide 180, the number of crackers in one container, by seven, the number of crackers that must be served to provide one ounce equivalent: 180 crackers divided by seven crackers for one ounce equivalent equals 25.7 one-ounce equivalent servings per container.

Round down to the nearest whole number, which equals 25 one-ounce equivalent servings per container.

Slide 85: Step 4–Amount to Purchase of Commercial Grain Products and Combination Foods

Step four in determining the amount to purchase of commercial grain products and combination foods is to determine how many containers to purchase. To do this, divide the total number of participants who are receiving the serving size by the number of the desired serving size included in one container.

For example, a CACFP Operator is serving 50 6–12-year-old children a one-ounce equivalent serving (seven crackers) at snack.

Divide 50, the number of participants, by 25, the number of one-ounce equivalent servings in one container: 50 participants divided by 25 one-ounce equivalent servings per container equals two containers of crackers.

Make sure to document how many servings are in a container for each serving size so the calculations only need to be performed once for each product!

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Slide 86: Training Objective 4

The fourth training objective in this online course is to recognize what documentation must be maintained to demonstrate CACFP meal pattern compliance.

During an AR, CDE reviewers will check each CACFP Operator’s documentation to ensure that the meal pattern requirements are met.

Slide 87: CDE Policy–Menu Production Records No Longer Required!

Let’s start with some great news! The CDE has issued a policy that menu production records are no longer required. Effective October 1, 2020, menu production records (or MPRs) are not required for those program operators who were previously required to complete and maintain them each day. Instead, child and adult care centers are only required to document on the menu the serving size for each age group for all reimbursable food items served.

At-risk afterschool programs, emergency shelters, and day care home providers are only required to maintain daily menus. These agency types were never required to maintain menu production records and are not required to document the serving sizes on their daily menus.

Slide 88: Menus with Serving Sizes Options

The requirement for child and adult centers to maintain menus with serving sizes can be met through several options:

  1. CACFP Operators can use the recently developed CDE menu templates, which were created specifically to help CACFP Operators with this new documentation requirement. These templates are available in the Download Forms section of the CNIPS as Form IDs CACFP 89 and CACFP 90;

  2. If the CACFP Operator does not want to use these templates, another option is that they can create their own menu template or use one developed by another agency;

  3. Another option is to continue to use menu production records. If menu production records are used, the only columns that must be completed are the menu and the serving size for each age group; And,

  4. The last option is for CACFP Operators who provide meals prepared off-site. In this situation, a transport record may be used to meet the requirement of maintaining a menu with serving sizes, since the menu and required serving size for each age group is required on transport records.

Slide 89: AR Onsite Meal Observation

Let’s move on to what happens during the AR onsite meal observation.

CDE reviewers:

  • May arrive unannounced prior to the date of the scheduled AR,
  • May observe meal preparation
  • Will observe the meal service, and
  • Will ask to see documentation that demonstrates that the meal pattern requirements were met.

If the documents are not immediately available because food was prepared off-site, the agency will have five days to provide the CDE reviewer with the required documentation.

These next slides provide an overview of what meal pattern documentation is required on the day of the onsite meal observation.

Slide 90: Daily Menus

The first documentation requirement are daily menus. CACFP Operators must maintain daily menus for children and adults. CDE reviewers will request daily menus for the AR month. The AR month is the last month the CACFP Operator submitted a claim for reimbursement before the scheduled date of review.

Slide 91: Menu Documentation for Each Age Group

The menus must document the following for each age group:

  • Food items served;

  • Serving sizes for each food item for centers only. Again, at-risk afterschool programs, emergency shelters, and day care home providers are not required to document serving sizes for each food item. This requirement only pertains to centers;

  • Menu substitutions;

  • Type of fluid milk served to each age group, which includes the percent fat and flavored or unflavored; and

  • Whole grain-rich foods served to meet the whole grain-rich requirement.

Slide 92: Product Labels–Nutrition Facts Labels, Ingredient Lists

CDE reviewers will request to see product labels, such as Nutrition Facts labels and Ingredients lists, on the day of the onsite meal observation only for food items served as part of reimbursable meals and snacks on that day. Product labels are not required to be copied or stored. They only must be maintained for the day of review. During a review year, CACFP Operators are required to retain all food labels until the end of each day in case of an unannounced review.

Slide 93: CN Labels

CDE reviewers will request CN Labels. CN Labels are available on some commercially processed main dish entrees that contribute to the meat/meat alternate component. As previously mentioned, a CN Label provides the contribution to the meal pattern for one serving of the product since most commercially processed main dish entrée products are not included in the Food Buying Guide yield tables. For example, CN Labels may be found on products such as burritos, chicken nuggets, and pizzas.

CN Labels must be maintained for three years plus the current program year.

Slide 94: Product Formulation Statements

CDE reviewers will also request product formulation statements. These are required for:

  • Commercially processed foods (such as burritos, chicken nuggets, and pizzas) that contribute to the meat/meat alternate component if the product does not include a CN Label and the product is not listed in the Food Buying Guide yield tables.

  • Product formulation statements are also required for commercially processed food items that do not have a Nutrition Facts label. For example, a product formulation statement must be obtained in order to serve whole wheat bread sold by a small, local bakery that is not required to include a Nutrition Facts label and Ingredients list on their products. The product formulation statement would provide the ingredients and the weight of ingredients in a serving of the bread to demonstrate that the product is a creditable grain and meets the minimum serving size requirements.

Product formulation statements must also be maintained for three years plus the current program year.

Slide 95: Additional Documentation Requirements

Additional documents that are required and may be requested on the day of the onsite meal observation include:

  • Standardized recipes for all homemade foods,
  • Medical statements when the CACFP meal pattern is not met,
  • Written Parental Request for a Fluid Milk Substitution, and
  • Transport Records.

These documents are required to be maintained for three years plus the current program year.

Slide 96: Infant Documentation

This slide provides an overview of documentation requirements for CACFP Operators who serve infants.

CACFP Operators must maintain written documentation to show that parents and guardians were notified that an infant formula is offered by the CACFP Operator. For those parents and guardians who decline the infant formula, the CACFP Operator must obtain written documentation from the parent or guardian of their decision to decline the infant formula provided and instead provide either an infant formula of their choice or breastmilk. Additional documentation required for infants includes whether infants were offered breastmilk, infant formula, or a combination of both. And, if infants are developmentally ready for solid food, the type of solid food items offered.

Please note, all CACFP agencies, except day care home providers, must also document the quantity of infant formula and solid food items offered.

CDE reviewers will request these documents on the day of the onsite meal observation.

Slide 97: CACFP Meal Pattern Documentation Resources

The CDE developed CACFP meal pattern documentation resources to provide guidance to CACFP Operators on what they need to provide to their CDE reviewer during an AR to demonstrate that foods claimed for reimbursement were creditable. These resources, located in the Referenced Resources section, include:

  • CDE Management Bulletin CACFP 01-2020, Documentation Requirements for CACFP Meal Patterns,
  • CDE CACFP Checklist of Documentation Requirements by Timeframe for Centers, Form ID CACFP 82, and
  • Section 16 of the CACFP Administrative Manual, AR Process for Compliance with the CACFP Meal Patterns.

It is important that all CACFP Operators carefully review these documents to understand the documentation requirements for an AR and when you will be expected to provide them during an AR.

Slide 98: Test Your Knowledge–Question #7

It is time to test what you have learned with question number seven! Final question!

Question: How long must CACFP Operators maintain Nutrition Facts labels and Ingredients lists for food items served and claimed for reimbursement?

  1. One day
  2. One month
  3. One year, or
  4. The past three years plus the current program year

Slide 99: Test Your Knowledge–Answer #7

The correct answer is a. One day.

CDE reviewers will request Nutrition Facts labels and Ingredients lists for food items served as part of the reimbursable meal on the day of the review. CACFP Operators are not required to save Nutrition Facts labels and Ingredients lists for more than one day; however, they must retain this documentation until the end of each day during a review year in case of an unannounced meal observation.

Slide 100: Resources

For links to guidance and resources referenced throughout this online course, see the Referenced Resources section adjacent to this online course.

Slide 101: Professional Standards Crediting

For program operators who must complete professional standards requirements, the professional standards crediting for this online course is:

  • Key Area: Nutrition (1000)

    • Training Topic: Menu Planning (1100)
      • Learning Objectives: Plan menus that meet USDA nutrition requirements for reimbursable meals, including calculating meal components (1110). Write standardized recipes and use the Food Buying Guide (1140).

The total instructional time is one hour.

Slide 102: Contact Information

For questions regarding the content of the course, the CACFP meal patterns, or CACFP meal patterns documentation requirements, please contact the CACFP Meal Patterns Team by email at CACFPMealPatterns@cde.ca.gov or by phone at 800-952-5609, Option 5.

Slide 103: Conclusion

In conclusion, thank you for completing the online course, CACFP Meal Pattern Compliance, Part Two–Using the USDA Online Food Buying Guide, course number 459. Please select Next on the online training screen for further instructions to complete the course and to submit your responses to the CDE. Please note: If you have maximized the video or accessed it on YouTube, you will need to return to the online training screen to select Next.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Referenced Resources

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Questions:   CACFP Meal Patterns Team | CACFPMealPatterns@cde.ca.gov | 800-952-5609 Option 5
Last Reviewed: Tuesday, December 22, 2020
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