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Transcript: Grade 8 High Use Words - Part 1

Grade Eight English Language Arts (ELA) Designated English Language Development (ELD) High Use Words Part One Video Transcript.

Grade Eight English Language Arts Designated English Language Development: High Use Words To Go–Part One

Introductory Slides (00:00–00:18)

Narrator: Welcome to the California Department of Education Integrated and Designated English Language Development Transitional Kindergarten Through Grade Twelve Video Series. This video is reproduced by permission of the publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, all rights reserved.

Teacher Introduces the Lesson (00:19–06:28)

Teacher: This morning we are going to learn two words, two high utility words that you are going to be seeing in school and in the workplace. These are words you've gotta have in your pocket, you've gotta have them ready to go because they're words that are used in informational texts. They're words that you need for you academic writing... that are words used on assessments, and words that are used in the evening news, and all kinds of reports in technical work. So, right now I'd like you to pick up your pen and take a look at the two words at the top of page 22. These are the first two Words To Go... the reason you'll see two words together are because these two words belong to a word family, they're sort of word cousins. So, we're going to learn what one means, then practice using it, then we'll learn what the second means, and get some practice applying that word. So right now, I'd like everyone to take your pen and point to the first word...

Students: [Point to the word] tend

Teacher: Our first high utility word is, “tend, tend”... let's say that together...

Students: [Chorally respond] tend

Teacher: One more time.

Students: [Chorally respond] tend

Teacher: Very good, and as you can see, it's followed by a preposition. The preposition "to" and the reason you see that in this lesson is because “tend to” is a verb. It is an action word, and it is almost always used with the preposition "to". You practically never ever see it all by itself. So, we're going to learn how to use “tend” with the preposition "to" in an academic context. Now... if you could all direct your attention to the screen and move your reading guide card right below... the next word that we're going to learn, and this word is the noun form. It is a word cousin of the verb "tend to", so please point to the noun "tendency"... and let's say it together. Listen carefully... “tendency”, everyone...

Students: [Chorally respond] tendency

Teacher: And this time, what if we tap out the syllables like this... [Teacher says and taps on the desk the syllables] ten-den-cy...Everyone.

Students: [Say and tap on desk] ten-den-cy

Teacher: One more time ten-den-cy. Now, without tapping... what is our Word To Go?...

Students: [Chorally respond] tendency

Teacher: Thank you, and “tendency” is the noun form, and I'll remind you a noun can be a person, place, thing or idea... and a tendency is a thing, and we're going to learn what this thing is. Before we really explore the meaning, I'd like to offer an example of… recently when I used the word, "tend to". My daughter turned 13 recently, and friends and family were asking me, since that's a special birthday, what an appropriate gift would be for her, and many people said... “Oh, shall we buy this CD? Does she like Bruno Mars? You know, does she like, you know, Taylor Swift?” and I said, “You know, I really don't recommend buying a CD for her because she tends to download individual songs off the internet, and not buy whole CDs. She tends to like maybe one song or two, and she tends to just download music rather than purchase music.” So, as you can see, “tend to” means to be likely to act, or think, in a certain way, so if you, if you do something regularly and you do something in a certain way, people will say that you what? You tend to… everyone.

Students: [Chorally respond] tend to

Teacher: … do that. Very good. Now let's move our reading guide card right underneath the example, and I'd like you to read the frame quietly, as I read it aloud. Then, we're going to think of ways to complete it. If I am nervous about making a presentation in class, I tend to... oh I've been nervous many times, as a student and as a teacher, and if I am nervous about making a presentation in class, I tend to do certain things. And before I give an example, I want you to notice that after “tend to”, let's all underline our preposition “to”. After that “to”, I know that I need a base verb, and what I mean by a base verb is just the basic verb—no "ed" on the ending no "s” or “ing"; I need just the base verb. So, let me think, what are some of the things I tend to do? Well, I would say that I tend to—when I get very nervous, when I'm not sure of my content—I tend to avoid eye contact. I look down, I look over, I avoid eye contact. I don't look at my audience. So, notice “avoid”, I have the base verb. And I could also say that I tend to speak in a certain way, I tend to speak rapidly, too quickly, when I'm very nervous. And other— I notice my students do have other speech patterns, when they are nervous. I'm going to ask you in a moment to share with your partner an example of what happens to you, what you tend to do when you're nervous. To prepare for that, let's read the example frame with my idea and let's do it with echo reading, so everyone please sit up. If I am nervous...

Students: If I am nervous…

Teacher: about making a presentation in class...

Students: about making a presentation in class...

Teacher: I tend to avoid eye contact.

Students: I tend to avoid eye contact.

Teacher: All right, let's do that one more time with my other idea. If I'm nervous…

Students: If I'm nervous…

Teacher: about making a presentation in class...

Students: about making a presentation in class...

Teacher: I tend to speak rapidly.

Students: I tend to speak rapidly.

Teacher: Excellent, now let's just brainstorm some examples together. I would like partner A to go first, and partner A using the frame right on page 22, read your example to your partner of something you do. So, maybe it's a way that you speak, or something you avoid doing, or something you do with your hands. Think of something you do and share with your partner. A go first and after A has finished, B you share your example.

Students Practicing the Featured Words To Go (06:29–06:50)

Student 1: If I am nervous about making a presentation in class, I tend to mumble and start shaking.

Student 2: If I am nervous about making a presentation in class, I tend to— I tend to place my hand across my mouth and speak quietly.

Student 3: If I am nervous about making a presentation in class, I tend to mumble my words.

Student 4: If I am nervous about making a presentation in class, I tend to talk very quietly.

Teacher Continues to Provide Instruction (06:51–11:13)

Teacher: As I walked around the room, I heard very appropriate and diverse examples, and I've asked Selena if she would please read her example, because I thought it was very appropriate, and so Selena in your public voice, please.

Selena: If I am nervous about making a presentation in class, I tend to mispronounce my words.

Teacher: All right, raise your hand if you've ever mispronounced a word while you're making a presentation in class.

[Students raise hands]

Teacher: And I too have mispronounced and stumbled, because when you're nervous, your tongue just isn't functioning very properly. Excellent. [Teacher scribes onto clipboard] to mispronounce words. Very appropriate and next I'd like to hear from—I'd love to hear from Navi. Next, Navi, in your public voice, could you please read your example.

Navi: If I'm nervous about making a presentation in class, I tend to play with my hands.

Teacher: Play with your hands. How many of you have played around with your hands like this? All right, excellent, and we've got time for one volunteer. How about from the right side of the class. And Isaac, thank you for raising your hand so rapidly.

Isaac: If I am nervous about making a presentation in class, I tend to place my hand on my mouth and speak quietly.

Teacher: All right, thank you, and boy, you had a double, a double answer there— place, if I understand you correctly, your idea was place your hands on your mouth, and what was the second part?

Isaac: Speak quietly.

Teacher: And speak quietly. Thank you. What I'd like you all to do right now is to select one of the ideas, either one that you heard, mine, avoid eye contact, or one of our others, and I'd like you to fill in the blank with your favorite example. Either your own, your partner’s, one you overheard at your table, or one that is displayed.

[Transition to next part of lesson]

Teacher: I would say that when it comes to technology, that teenagers like my daughter have a tendency to be more comfortable with new technology than their parents, like me. So, if we get a new VCR, if we have something new with the television, or my computer, I tend to ask my daughter, because she has a tendency to be much more knowledgeable than me. So, when we talk about a tendency, it's part of your character, the way you are, part of your character that makes you likely to act or think in a certain way. So, please write in, “in a certain way”.

[Students write in their workbooks]

Teacher: So, if you usually get to school really early, or if you usually run in the first period after the bell already rang, if you are usually early or usually late, someone can say, oh that's just her— what?

Students: [Chorally respond] her tendency...

Teacher: Very good. Now, we have a fun example. Let's look at our example frame. Please put your card right underneath the example and point with your pen where it says “students”. We're going to learn about students’ tendencies and our example frame is, “Students have a tendency to blank, when there is a substitute teacher.” All right, I've seen appropriate behavior and I've seen very inappropriate behavior when there's a substitute teacher. I would say, students have a tendency to complete work and that's— that's a good habit, but they have a tendency to complete work for other classes when there is a substitute teacher. So, if it's English, they're doing math, if it's math, they're doing history. So, that's my example. You're going to have an opportunity to share an example with your partner of what students have a tendency to do, not with their actual teacher, but with a substitute. So, let's get comfortable with the frame with my idea. “Students have a tendency to...” Everyone.

Students: Students have a tendency to...

Teacher: complete work for other classes…

Students: complete work for other classes...

Teacher: when there is a substitute teacher.

Students: when there is a substitute teacher.

Teacher: Very good, now I'd like you each to take a moment to think: Imagine classes you've had this year with substitute teachers. What is some behavior that the principal would really not want to witness if he were to walk in. Just think about it, what is— what are some behaviors, some things students have a tendency to do, just thinking. All right, I'd like partner B to share first, and partner B please use the frame, and then partner A, you share. Partner B, you are on.

Students Practicing the Featured Words To Go (11:14–11:39)

Student 1: Students have a tendency to change their names when there is a substitute teacher.

Student 3: Students have the tendency to misbehave when there is a substitute teacher.

Student 5: Students have a tendency to goof off when there is a substitute teacher.

Student 6: Students have a tendency to do unproductive stuff when there is a substitute teacher.

Teacher Concludes the Lesson (11:40–13:56)

Teacher: As I walked around the room, I heard some very strong examples, very vivid examples. Now I have asked Ariana if she would please go first.

Ariana: Students have the tendency to take out their electronics when there is a substitute teacher.

Teacher: Okay, any witnessing of electronics coming out? Thank you, to take out their electronics. What if we hear next from Myra. Myra, in your public voice, could you please share your example.

Myra: Students have the tendency to do unproductive stuff when there is a substitute teacher.

Teacher: Okay, and “stuff” is a pretty casual word. Do unproductive things, what's an example of an unproductive thing.

Myra: Horse around.

Teacher: Horse around, well said. Now I need some assistance, if your partner had a strong example, your partner had an entertaining, or strong example, point to your partner. If your partner had a different idea.

[Students pointing to one another]

Teacher: My, and we have some very immediate and dual nominations. What if we hear right now from Eugenio.

Eugenio: Students have a tendency to switch their names when there is a substitute teacher.

Teacher: Do you know that has happened to me. Students have a tendency to switch their names; that is funny. Okay, thank you, since you nominated your partner as well, could we kindly hear your idea?

Student 7: Students have a tendency to use their electronic devices while—where— when there is a substitute teacher.

Teacher: All right, and I appreciate that your idea was similar, but you added that idea, use their electronic devices. All right, we've got time for one more example; do we have a volunteer? Daniel, looks like you're eager to share.

Daniel: Students have a tendency to consider having inappropriate behavior in inappropriate language when there's a substitute teacher.

Teacher: All right. So students have a tendency to consider—very strong verb—consider using inappropriate language, and we won't ask for examples! All right, I recorded a number of your ideas. What I'd like you to do right now is to fill in the blank with your favorite idea, either your own, your partner’s, one you overheard at the table, or one that you see displayed on the screen.

[Students complete worksheet]

Questions:   Language Policy and Leadership Office | 916-319-0845
Last Reviewed: Friday, November 13, 2020
Recently Posted in English Learners