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Transcript: Grade 8 High Use Words - Part 2

Grade Eight English Language Arts (ELA) Designated English Language Development (ELD) High Use Words Part Two Video Transcript.

Grade Eight English Language Arts Designated English Language Development: High Use Words To Go–Part Two

Introductory Slides (00:00–00:17)

Narrator: Welcome to the California Department of Education Integrated and Designated English Language Development Transitional Kindergarten Through Grade Twelve Video Series This video is reproduced by permission of the publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, all rights reserved.

Teacher Introduces the Lesson (00:18–03:50)

Teacher: All right, now that we've had an opportunity to pronounce our words, to examine examples, as well as meanings, let's move and begin practicing using the word. Please point to our first discussion frame. You're going to discuss and write examples, and in this first frame, your only task will be to fill in appropriate content, because our Word To Go is already used. Please read along quietly as I read aloud the frame: “My English teacher tends to reward students who have completed their assignments well with (blank).” There are a couple grammar targets here I want to point out to you. And the first is, let's underline that "s" on “tends to”, because my English teacher is just one person, and because we're talking about what she does most of the time, or usually, it's in the present tense, so we need that "s". So, “My English teacher tends to reward students who've completed their assignments well with”—after “with”, we need a noun or a noun phrase—and what I mean by a noun phrase, is a group of words that name a thing. We either need a single word that names a thing, or a group of words that name a thing. So, it's that preposition "with" that tells me I need “with something”. I need a noun. So, I'm looking here and thinking, what would be examples. I'm an English teacher, of things I've rewarded my students with who've done excellent work, and completed their work on time, and done a very responsible job. I've rewarded them with—in free time to read magazines, and I have a number of magazines that they enjoy reading: teen magazines. So, they've earned ten minutes or so to read an article about one of their favorite musicians or sports teams. That's my example, and you are going to share your example with your partner. So, let's get comfortable using the frame and my idea. “My English teacher...”

Students: My English teacher...

Teacher: tends to reward students...

Students: tends to reward students...

Teacher: who have completed their assignments well...

Students: who have completed their assignments well...

Teacher: with free time to read magazines.

Students: with free time to read magazines.

Teacher: All right, think of something your English teacher has rewarded you with if you've completed your work well. All right, this time I would like partner A to go first. Where are my As? I'd like you to read your sentence fluently. Think about how you'd fill it in, but don't fill in the blanks yet. Just say your idea out loud. So, this is what I do, and I'll pretend, using Christina's book. I'll pretend that Sylvester is my partner: “My English teacher tends to reward students who've completed their assignments well with free time to read magazines.” You're going to read it fluently, then put your book down and look at your partner, make eye contact, and say it with expression, and if you need to glance down, that's all right. So, I'll do this: “My English teacher tends to reward students who've completed their assignments well with free time to read magazines.” So, you're going to read it fluently, then put your book down and look at your partner and say it with expression. All right, As you'll go first, then Bs share your idea, and if I haven't called time yet, if I haven't called one, two, three, I'd like you each to share your example sentence one more time. All right, As please begin.

Students Practicing the Featured Words To Go (03:51–04:17)

Student 1: My English teacher tends to reward students who have completed their assignments well with free time on the computers.

Student 2: My English teacher tends to reward students who have completed their assignments well with more time to complete other assignments.

Student 3: My English teacher tends to reward students who have completed their assignments well with no homework the next night.

Teacher Continues the Lesson (04:18–09:44)

Teacher: As I walked around the room, I heard very appropriate examples and I've asked Daniel if he would please go first and to share his example, using his public voice. I'm going to ask you to put your pens down and to listen carefully to your classmates who are reporting. After they share their examples, I'm going to ask you to record in the blank your favorite: either your own, your partner’s, perhaps one you overheard at your table, or one of your classmates or mine. So, Daniel, now in your public voice, if you could please share your idea.

Daniel: My English teacher tends to reward students who have completed their assignments well with the permission of allowing, um, friends to socialize.

Teacher: All right, with permission to socialize. Excellent, and Daniel you're going to assist me. Daniel, I would like—we’re going to popcorn, and what I'd like you to do is to select a classmate, and since you're a male, I'd like you to select a female from another table. And we know that instead of saying something silly, like “popcorn Selena,” instead we're going to say, “I choose” or what's our other strong verb...

Students: [Chorally respond] select

Teacher: Very good, so “I choose” or “select” and if he selects Myra, Myra is next, for example. Thank you, Daniel, will you select the next reporter?

Daniel: I select Marissa.

Marissa: My English teacher tends to reward students who have completed their assignments well with free time to do other work from other classrooms.

Teacher: All right, thank you! Excellent example, free time to do work for other classes. And will you kindly select another classmate?

Marissa: I select Chris.

Teacher: Chris, thank you.

Chris: My English teacher tends to reward students who have completed their assignments well with permission to use their cellular devices and access their computers.

Teacher: Okay, so permission to use cellular devices, and if I understand you correctly, it was and access the computer... and access their computers.

Chris: Yes, that is accurate.

Teacher: Thank you very much. All right, we have time for two volunteers and I greatly appreciate one from the left and the right, and what if we hear from Oscar. Thank you, Oscar.

Oscar: My English teacher tends to reward students who have completed their assignments well with blue tickets.

Teacher: With blue tickets, all right, thank you, and I've observed that, and help remind of us all what the blue tickets represent.

Oscar: We get two points.

Teacher: Two points, two participation points. Thank you Oscar, very relevant example. And I'd like another volunteer from the left. I saw a few hands go up. All right, Navi. thank you.

Navi: My English teacher tends to reward students who have completed their assignments well with no homework the following night.

Teacher: Oh, I think I might vote for that one. All right, no homework the following night. We've just heard a wide range of ideas; I recorded quite a number of them. I'd like you to write your favorite idea. Now we're going to our final task and this is our writing task. I'd like you each to point to the frame. As you'll notice, in the frame there are two blanks, and in our verbal task, we only had one blank. To complete content this time, you're going to fill in the correct form of the word and appropriate content, and since we have a word family, we need to have either the correct form of “tend” or “tendency”. Let's examine the frame and figure out whether we need the verb or the noun form. It says, “The coach's (blank) to (blank) during games made him unpopular with many athletes and parents.” Now I see a few grammar clues there, the first is this apostrophe "s" that signals there's a possessive. It's something that belongs to someone, so, we need a thing, and after that possessive, I would say since we need a noun, a thing, what form do we need students?

Students: [Chorally respond] tendency

Teacher: Absolutely, let's write in “tendency”. It's something that belongs to him. I could say: the coach's car; the coach's new puppy; the coach's tendency. It's something that belongs to him, part of his character. So now, “The coach's tendency to (blank) during games made him unpopular.” All right, after "to"—then there again we have that preposition "to"—and after "to" I'll remind you, as we did at the top, we need a base verb. And by a base verb we have no "s" no "ed" no "ing" just the basic verb. So, I've seen coaches at my brother’s baseball games, and soccer games, and at my son's wrestling matches, and I've seen some very appropriate coaching behavior, but sadly some inappropriate coaching behavior. An example of something that would make— a coach could do that would make both parents and athletes unhappy would be a tendency to argue with referees. So, see I have the base form there. So, this is my example; let's read it, and in a moment, you'll share with your partner. Here we go: “The coach's tendency...”

Students: [Echo read] The coach's tendency...

Teacher: to argue with referees...

Students: [Echo read] to argue with referees...

Teacher: during games...

Students: [Echo read] during games...

Teacher: made him unpopular with many athletes and parents.

Students: [Echo read] made him unpopular with many athletes and parents.

Teacher Models Reading Fluency with Academic Conversational Structures (09:45–12:07)

Teacher: Think about a behavior a coach might have that would really make parents say, “Oh, I hope he's not the coach next year,” or “Oh, how does he get away with that?” Just thinking of behavior that would be very inappropriate. Right now, I'm going to have you write your idea first. Everybody write your idea carefully and in a moment we'll share, but write your idea first, and if I could help you with spelling or grammar, just call me over. All right, students, I see some very appropriate examples of inappropriate behavior in there of tendencies. So right now, let's remind ourselves of our directions. First, I would like partner Bs to go first, and Bs you're going to read your sentence. Daniel, everybody, we're going to read our sentence, then we're going to say it with expression, but I would like your partner to restate the idea. So, let's pretend. Miriam, may I practice with you? I'm going to pretend I'm reading my idea to you. All right, and I'm going to say: “The coach's tendency to... to jump up and down during games made him unpopular with many athletes and parents. The coach's tendency to jump up and down during games made him unpopular with many athletes and parents.” So, after I've read my idea fluently, then said it with expression and really made eye contact, I want my partner to restate my idea. So, when we restate, there are a number of ways we could do that. [Teacher points to a chart] and in our academic discussions, we've been saying, “So your perspective is…” But today you're not really giving an opinion, you're giving an idea or example, so let's say... let's say, “So, your idea is...” All right, so... so... let's all practice that, so your idea is…”

Students: So, your idea is…

Teacher: Then say it back to your partner as well as possible, and you know the ropes, what do we do next? So, let's pretend that Myra got it right, what do I say?

Students: [Chorally respond] Yes. Yes, that's accurate.

Teacher: “Yes, that's accurate,” and if she didn't quite... I could say, “Yes that's accurate” or “Yes that's correct,” and if it isn't quite correct what do you say...

Students: [Chorally respond] No, not exactly. What I meant was…

Teacher: And say it back correctly. All right, excellent! You've got it, partner B, you're on, partner B.

Students Practice Reading Fluency Using the Featured Words To Go (12:08–12:40)

Student 4: The coach's tendency to yell and create arguments during games made him unpopular with many athletes and parents.

Daniel: So, what you are saying is the coach's tendency to argue with the other athletes made him unpopular with many athletes and parents.

Student 4: Yes, that is accurate and correct.

Daniel: The coach's tendency to argue....

Teacher Requires Students to Share and Concludes the Lesson (12:41–15:09)

Teacher: I've asked a couple students to be our discussion jumper cables, to get it going, and I've asked Chris, if Chris would begin by sharing his highly relevant example. Thank you, Chris.

Chris: The coach's tendency to criticize and use profanity against other competitors during games made him unpopular with many athletes and parents.

Teacher: Whoa! That's a double whammy, to criticize and use profanity against other players! Those are two very, very, very inappropriate tendencies, I might add. Thank you, Chris, and I've also asked Jennifer to share her example. Jennifer had an equally strong example.

Jennifer: The coach's tendency to come late during the game made him unpopular with many athletes and parents.

Teacher: All right, all right. And would you kindly read that just one more time in your public voice. I didn't catch the second part.

Jennifer: The coach's tendency to come late during games made him unpopular with many athletes and parents.

Teacher: Thank you, really relevant example, a coach who arrives late really gets the game off to a very poor start. Fabulous example, thank you. Now I'm just going to pull a few name cards, and I've pulled Selena's name. So, Selena if you could please share your idea.

Selena: The coach's tendency to convey inappropriate language to adolescents and act aggressively constantly during games made him unpopular with many athletes and parents.

Teacher: Those are two very poor tendencies: to convey inappropriate language and act aggressively. I pulled one more name, and this time, I have Myra. Myra, could you please share your example, Myra?

Myra: The coach's tendency to yell at students during games made him unpopular with many athletes and parents.

Teacher: Thank you, very thoughtful example. We've got time for two additional examples, and I'd appreciate one from the back, as well as the front. And Christina, what if we began with Christina, in the front.

Christina: The coach's tendency to physically harm another competitor during games made him unpopular with many athletes and parents.

Teacher: I should say, so physically harm a competitor. Thank you, Christina. I hope that's not something you've personally witnessed. Thank you. And we had another volunteer from the back, where's one of our volunteers from the back. Let's see, all right, thank you so much.

Oscar: The coach's tendency to scream at the players during games made him unpopular with many athletes and parents.

Teacher: Thank you very much. Thank you, Oscar.

Questions:   Language Policy and Leadership Office | 916-319-0845
Last Reviewed: Friday, November 13, 2020
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