Skip to main content
California Department of Education Logo

Transcript: Grade 8 Academic Discussion - Part 1

Grade Eight English Language Arts (ELA) Designated English Language Development (ELD) Academic Discussion Part One Video Transcript.

Grade Eight English Language Arts Designated English Language Development: Academic Discussion–Part One

Introductory Slides (00:00–00:17)

Narrator: Welcome to the California Department of Education Integrated and Designated English Language Development transitional Kindergarten through Grade Twelve Video Series. This video is reproduced by permission of the publisher, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Teacher Introduces the Lesson (00:18–04:23)

Teacher: Today we're going to have a discussion on a very interesting topic for our issue, and this is a topic we'll be delving into in considerable detail because we'll be writing about it and debating about it as we move through this issue. So, let's examine our question. I'm going to read it aloud then I'd like you to chorally read it with me. What are the consequences of sleep deprivation? Let's read it chorally. One, two...

Students: [Chorally] What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?

Teacher: And yesterday we explored the noun 'consequence' and we have the plural form here. And we learned that consequences are effects, or results, of something that happens. So, to remind us of the meaning, let's write 'effects' right above consequences. So, in this discussion we need to give serious thought to the consequences, or results, of sleep deprivation, not getting enough sleep, not just one night, but multiple nights throughout a school week. So, in our academic discussion we're going to begin with just brainstorming ideas. And I'll remind you that when we quickly brainstorm we're not worrying about writing complete sentences or using the most precise grammar and spelling or vocabulary, we're just trying to get a quick list of ideas that we'll then review to select one or two ideas that we wish to develop in much more detail in our academic discussion. So, we're going to let our minds just go freely. And as I look at our table, I see that we have two different topics that we need to brainstorm on. And one type of consequence is a physical consequence. And the other category of consequences are mental consequences. So, when I think about physical consequences, or consequences, things that happen to my body, a number of ideas come to mind. And the first is just getting out of shape. Not being at all fit. But another consequence is getting sick a lot. And one idea that comes to mind for me is getting sick a lot. And a third is, when, when I think of the teens that I work with regularly, teens who are under a lot of stress, one consequence is either losing or gaining weight. Now I'm going to move over to the mental consequences. What happens to your mind? What happens to your emotions and your behavior? And one definite consequence is that students tend to have much less interest in friends. They don't feel like socializing, hanging out with people. They just feel like staying home. And another consequence is that, I've observed as a teacher, is that they have trouble paying attention. In class I see they're not making eye contact with me. They're putting their head on the desk, they seem to be falling asleep. So, just trouble paying attention. And a third very serious consequence, a mental consequence, is I see students that were really interested in extracurricular activities, like sports or taking salsa dancing or being in a particular club, don't seem very interested. Um, so, so lose interest in clubs, sports, hobbies. These are some physical and mental consequences that come to mind immediately for me witnessing the effects of sleep loss on teens. I'd like you to look at the examples I've provided and, if you wish, copy one of mine to start your physical and mental brainstorm list. And then I'd like you to put at least two ideas of your own in each column.

Students Brainstorm Ideas and Prepare to Discuss (04:24–05:43)

Teacher: Thank you for brainstorming such a productive list of ideas. So right now, I'm going to ask you to review your list. To review both lists and to select one choice from each because we're going to write a sentence about both physical and mental consequences. And as I examine my list, I think I'd like to develop this idea of getting sick a lot and I think I'd like to develop this idea of losing interest in clubs and hobbies and sports. So, you review your list and select the mental and physical consequence that you wish to develop in our academic discussion. And please put a check next to your favorite idea.

[Students review their lists and engage in partner talk.]

Teacher: All right, students, you've just had an opportunity to interact with your partner and hear his or her perspective. Now I'd like you to move to our note taking column and where it says, 'classmate's name' record your partner's name. And then put your partner's idea, just in a brief phrase in brief notes. So as an illustration I've written Selena's name and just part, the gist, of her idea that one physical consequence is looking pale and sickly. So, write the consequence in just a brief phrase right here where it says ‘ideas’.

[Students add to their notes.]

Teacher Models Partner Interactions and Students Share Ideas (05:44–10:09)

Teacher: As you listen to her idea, I'd like you to be considering, 'Do I agree with this idea?' or 'We disagree.' Let's pretend that I called on Chris next. Then, if your idea is a lot like Selena's then you can say 'I agree with Selena's idea'. Let's all say that.

Students: [Chorally] I agree with Selena's idea.

Teacher: Often, we do need to disagree with someone but we want to do it in a polite way. So, one very polite way to do that is to say, 'I don't quite agree with Dr. Kinsella's idea'. 'I don't quite agree with my manager's idea.' All right, or, 'I don't quite agree with Marcus's idea.' So, let's say that you don't quite agree with Marcus, what are you going to say to make it polite? Everyone?

Students: [Chorally] I don't quite agree with Marcus's idea.

Teacher: All right. Thank you. Selena if you could right now then, in your eloquent public voice, and please share your perspective.

Selena: One physical consequence of sleep deprivation for adolescents is having headaches constantly and always looking fatigued.

Teacher: Right, having headaches constantly and always looking fatigued. I appreciated several things about her response. First, she used very precise words 'constantly' and 'fatigued' and she talked about that they have headaches constantly and then she even elaborated on that result. Thank you for that very fine response. So, let's all record having headaches constantly as a physical response.

[Students add to their notes.]

Teacher: And Selena could you kindly assist me and selecting a classmate? We'll do popcorn selection. And I'll remind you that with popcorn we don't just say the person's name you can say, 'Sylvester, I select Sylvester' or 'I choose Sylvester.' Thank you, Selena.

Selena: I select Myra.

Myra: One physical impact of sleep deprivation for adolescents is feeling very lethargic and being bipolar.

Teacher: All right. So, feeling lethargic and being bipolar. And I do want to point out that bipolar is a serious condition. You don't just get tired and all of a sudden become bipolar. That bipolar is a very serious condition that some people have that isn't just a result of being fatigued. But we'll put feeling lethargic. Okay. And could you kindly popcorn to another classmate?

Myra: I popcorn Ivan.

Teacher: I select.

Myra: I select Ivan.

Teacher: Thank you.

Ivan: One visible consequence of sleep deprivation for adolescents is gaining weight.

Teacher: Is gaining weight. Thank you. It's gaining weight. And Ivan, can you select another classmate?

Ivan: I select, um, Daniel.

Daniel: I agree with Ivan that idea that one physical consequence of sleep deprivation is gaining weight.

Teacher: Right, thank you. Thank you for acknowledging Ivan and for using a complete sentence. Thank you. And I'm going to open it up to three volunteers, one from the left, one from the middle, and one from the right. So, I'd like you to quickly reflect and consider if you have an idea that is different than those that have already been contributed. Thank you, Isaac. I appreciate your volunteering.

Isaac: One physical consequence of sleep deprivation for adolescents is becoming less active and wanting to stay home.

Teacher: I love the fact that you, you not only said becoming less active but in wanting to stay home. May I have a volunteer from the center of the room please? Thank you very much.

Student 1: One physical consequence for sleep deprivation for adolescents is looking pale.

Teacher: Looking pale. And looking pale is a very, very clear example. When you look pale how do you look?

Student 1: Very white.

Teacher: All right, very white without any color in your face. Thank you. You did an excellent job of discussing physical consequences. Now we're going to turn our attention to mental consequences. What happens to your attitude and your behavior and the way you think and the way you act and what you believe? So, let's move our reading guide card back to our second frame.

Teacher Prepares Students to Discuss their Perspectives with a Partner (10:10–13:13)

Teacher: Now you're going to have an opportunity to discuss your perspective with your partner. But we're going to be using two different uh, sets of language for academic interaction in this, in this particular exchange of ideas. The first thing I'm going to ask you to do is to elaborate upon your idea. And I've asked you to do that before, but I'll remind you what that means is to provide more information. So, a teacher may say to you on a paper that you—"interesting perspectives but you need to elaborate.” And what your teacher wants you to do is to provide more information. So, what I'm going to ask you to do, we'll begin with partner As, is to read your idea. Then say it with expression, with eye contact and expression. Then, elaborate. And you may either say, 'for example' or you may say, 'I know this first hand'. And when you say, 'I know this firsthand' it means it's happened to me. I've experienced it. And I'll model what I want you to do. I'm going to pretend that Ivan is my partner. One physical consequence of sleep deprivation for adolescents is getting sick frequently and missing several days of school. One physical consequence of sleep deprivation is getting sick constantly and missing several days of school. And I know this firsthand, because as a first period teacher, I know that there are students who are constantly tardy, who miss several days of school because they have the flu, they have asthma, they have colds, that are triggered by having so many missed hours of sleep during the school week. After I elaborate, then Ivan is going to restate back. So, he's going to restate back what he thinks he heard from me. So, he's, we've restated before, so he's going to say, 'So you believe that...' Let's all say that.

Students: [Chorally] So you believe that...

Teacher: And he'll repeat. So, he might say, 'So you believe that... a lot— one physical consequence is just getting sick a lot like with the flu or asthma and missing school'. And in that case, what would I say? If he's got it right, what do I say?

Students: [Chorally] Yes, that's correct.

Teacher: But if he doesn't, one, to say politely back to a manager at work, uh, to a teacher, you don't say 'No' and look, and look rude. So, what can say, ‘No, not exactly’. What I stated was, and we've said before, 'What I said was...' or, 'What I meant was...', but today we're going to use a new verb, ‘stated’. And to state is a more formal way of saying 'say'. So, let's say that. No, not exactly.'

Students: [Chorally] No, not exactly.

Teacher: What I stated was...

Students: [Chorally] What I stated was...

Teacher: I would like partner A to speak first and elaborate. And then partner B is going to restate partner A's idea. All right? And then you're going to switch roles, and partner B will go first. All right, my partner As, where are my partner As? Partner As, please turn around make eye contact with partner B and read your response.

Students Discuss their Perspectives with a Partner (13:13–14:09)

Student 2: One physical outcome of sleep deprivation for adolescents is looking pale and regularly fatigued. I know this firsthand because my brother is usually sleep deprived.

Student 3: Okay so what you're saying is that one physical consequence of sleep deprivation, one physical outcome of sleep deprivation for adolescents is pale and fatigued because you know this firsthand because your brother is, um, sleep deprived.

Student 2: Yes, that's good.

Student 3: One physical consequence of sleep deprivation for adolescent is gaining weight and missing school frequently.

Student 2: You know this firsthand because...

Student 3: I know this firsthand because, um, I'm always tired.

Student 2: So, what you're saying is that one physical consequence of sleep deprivation for adolescents is, is gaining weight and regularly missing school. And you know this firsthands because you're usually the person who does it?

Student 3: Yes, that's correct.

Students Take Discussion-based Notes (14:09–14:09)

Teacher: All right, students, you've just had an opportunity to interact with your partner and hear his or her perspective. Now, I'd like you to move to our note-taking column, and where it says classmate's name, record your partner's name and then put your partner's idea, just in a brief phrase, in brief notes. So, as an illustration I've written Selena's name and just part, the gist of her idea that one physical consequence is looking pale and sickly. So, write the consequence in just a brief phrase right here where it says ‘ideas’.

Questions:   Language Policy and Leadership Office | 916-319-0845
Last Reviewed: Friday, November 13, 2020
Recently Posted in English Learners