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Transcript: Grade 8 Interaction Protocols - Part 2

Grade Eight English Language Arts (ELA) Designated English Language Development (ELD) Interaction Protocols Part Two Video Transcript.

Grade Eight English Language Arts Designated English Language Development: Interaction Protocols—Part Two

Introductory Slides (00:00–00:17)

Narrator: Welcome to the California Department of Education Integrated and Designated English Language Development Transitional Kindergarten Through Grade Twelve Video Series. This video is reproduced by permission of the publisher, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Teacher Introduces the Lesson (00:18–2:04)

Teacher: Let's right now... I'm going to have you take a look here and you're going to share some ideas with your partner. But, what I'd like you to do, and I'll put this up again, is instead of just sharing one idea quickly, what I'd like you to do is share your idea a few times. And Anthony would you mind coming up for a moment and bringing your paper with you?

Teacher: I'm going to practice with Anthony for a moment exactly how I'd like you to share. What Anthony and I are going to do is, we're not going to read once. It's not going to be one and done. We're going to share our idea three times. And the first time I'm going to read my idea to Anthony and I'm not going to write it yet. I'm just going to say the blanks out loud. I'm going to fill in my idea. So, we're going to explore a lot of ideas and then after we have our discussion with the whole class, I'll let you write in any words you like. Your very favorites.

Teacher: So, I'm going to read my idea once, and then I'm going to read it again with my very best reading. And the third time, I'm going to look at Anthony's eyes. I'm going to make eye contact and I'm going to say it with expression. Say it like a scholar. Like this, Anthony.

Teacher: I work effectively with a partner who is focused and patient. I work effectively with a partner who's focused and patient. I work effectively with a partner who is focused and patient.

Teacher: So, the third time, what are we going to do? The first time we say it once. We read it once. We read it again. What do we do the third time everyone?

Students: [choral response] Make eye contact.

Teacher: And say it with expression. Say it like a scholar. Thank you, Anthony. Thank you. You may sit down.

Students Practice Exchanging Ideas (02:05–04:41)

Teacher: So, so right now take another moment just to think, what are your two adjectives you want to start with? And I'll put back up the list and feel free to borrow any of these that you wish. Feel free. Partner As, please begin sharing three times and then Bs it's your opportunity to share three times. And students, if I haven't called time saying three, two, one, please share again. Each of you three times. Thank you A partners. Please lead the discussion.

Student 1: I work effectively with a partner who is hard working and focused.

[Student in the background: … helpful and focused.]

Student 1: I work effectively with a partner who is confident, I mean, hard working and focused. I work effectively with a partner who is hard working and focused.

Student 2: I work effectively with a partner who is tech savvy and serious. I work effectively with a partner who is tech savvy and serious. I work... I work effectively with a partner who is serious and tech savvy.

Student 3: I work effectively with a partner who is helpful... no, patient and helpful. I work effectively with a partner who is, who is, who is patient and helpful. I work effectively with a partner who is patient and helpful.

Student 4: I work effectively with a partner who is helpful and focused. I work effectively with a partner who is helpful and focused. I work effectively with a partner who is helpful and patient. I mean, helpful and focused.

Student 5: I work effectively with a partner who is focused and hard working.

Teacher: Hard working. Okay, so Nick, can I call on you first? I'd love to have you... I'll call on you first and get it out of the way. Can you? Thank you. So, you're gonna be first okay. Can I hear yours? Anthony.

Student 6: I work effectively with a partner who is helpful and on-task.

Teacher: On-task, I love it, Anthony. So, Anthony, will you volunteer that one?

Student 6: Sure.

Teacher: I am going to ask for volunteers. Will you? Okay, cause that's, I don't think we're gonna get that.

Student 6: I work effectively with a partner who is helpful and on-task. I work effectively with a partner who is helpful and on-task.

Student 5: I work effectively with a partner who is focused and hard working. I work effectively with a partner who is focused and hardworking. I work effectively with a partner who is focused and hardworking.

Teacher Concludes the Lesson (04:42–07:27)

Teacher: All right students, one, two, three, eyes on me.

Students: [choral response] One, two, eyes on you.

Teacher: Thank you. So, I was very impressed with the wide variety of ideas that I heard in the room. There are some popular ideas, some frequent flyers, and there's some novel and original ideas, ideas that not too many people were sharing. So, I have asked a few students to help me out with the discussion, to get it started. But first I would like to point out something I'd like everyone to do: That as we're listening, if someone shares an idea that is a lot like yours, what did we learn recently that we say? We don't say “Hui took my idea” or “Loan already said mine.” Thank you. What would we say?

Student 7: We say my idea was similar to (uh).

Teacher: Thank you and that is beautifully stated. So, my idea is similar to...

Student 7: Somebody.

Teacher: And then say their name. So, thank you for contributing that. So, let's pretend your idea was a lot like Daniel's. What we could begin by saying, if I call on you, is, “My idea is similar to Daniel's.” Everyone.

Students: [choral response] My idea is similar to Daniel's.

Teacher: Then you share the rest of your idea. You share your idea and that's what real scholars do. They listen attentively and respectfully. So, we're going to say that and thank you for remembering that. And I have asked a few students if they could help me just get the discussion going. And I've asked Nick if he would please, in his public voice, really, Nick, would you mind standing up please. Stand up and really project your voice Nick. And you may use the frame here. And actually, before Nick shares, why don't we all wake up our public voice. Right now, I'm gonna... we'll echo read. Just so we all have our voice at the right volume.

Teacher: I work effectively...

Students: [choral response] I work effectively...

Teacher: With a partner...

Students: [choral response] With a partner...

Teacher: Who is focused...

Students: [choral response] Who is focused...

Teacher: And creative.

Students: [choral response] And creative.

Teacher: Thank you and if I ask you to stand to report, will you please pick up your paper? So that way you can really project your voice. So, let's all look respectfully toward Nick. Thank you, Nick.

Student 5: I work effectively with a partner who is focused and hard working.

Teacher: Who's focused and hard working. Pencils up if you'd appreciate a partner who's focused, really pays attention, and hard working. Thank you, Nick, for getting us off to such a productive start.

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Last Reviewed: Friday, December 11, 2020
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