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Using the Interim Assessments


.This is an Accessible Alternate Version (AAV) of the Using the Interim Assessments to support Teaching and Learning throughout the Year presentation posted on the 2017 CAASPP Institute Training Materials page. The Microsoft PowerPoint version (PPT) available there is the preferred version for most users.

Slide 1

2 minutes for slides 1 through 3 and total running time is 2 minutes    

Slide intent: The purpose of this slide is to introduce the session.
Slide Contents:

Using Interim Assessments to Support Teaching and Learning Throughout the Year

Presenter says:

Welcome to the Using Interim Assessments to Support Teaching and Learning Through the Year session of the 2016-2017 CAASPP Institute. 

(Presenters briefly introduces themselves and talk about their background.)

  • The goal of today’s session is to dig deeper and explore how interim assessments can be used in both standardized and nonstandardized ways and how they can be used to provide teachers with valuable information about the strengths and areas of improvement of their students. Our time today is going to be focused on digging deeper into the interim assessments and the resources available to support teaching and learning.
  • For anyone who needs more of an introduction to the interim assessments, I encourage you to visit the resources section on the Interim Assessments page of the CDE's website. There, you can find the Digital Library and Interim Assessment Clinic Video, Interim Assessment Video Series, and the Smarter Balanced Interim Assessments Overview document.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 2

2 minutes for slides 1 through 3 and total running time is 2 minutes    

Slide intent: The intent of this slide is to state the learning goals of the session.
Slide Contents:

Learning Goals

Participants will understand:

    • the features and different uses of the two different types of interim assessments;
    • how nonstandardized uses of the interim assessments and related resources are a powerful tool in supporting improved teaching and learning; and
    • how to support teachers in professional learning through the use of the Interim Assessment Viewing System and the Hand Scoring Training Guides and Exemplars.
Presenter says:
  • Our learning goals for this session are to understand:
    • The Smarter Balanced Interim Assessments, both the Interim Assessment Blocks (IABs) and the Interim Comprehensive Assessments (ICAs).
    • The different uses of the interim assessments: standardized and nonstandardized.
    • And to learn about how nonstandard administration of the interim assessments can support teaching and learning in very powerful ways.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 3

2 minute for slides 1 through 3 and total running time is 2 minutes    

Slide intent: The purpose of this slide is to state the success criteria of the session.
Slide Contents:

Success Criteria

Participants can:

    • identify multiple uses of ICAs and IABs;
    • explain how different uses of the interim assessments can enhance student and teacher learning; and
    • provide information and training to others on the Interim Assessment Viewing System and the Hand Scoring System and associated resources. 
Presenter says:
  • Our success criteria will be that you can:

    • Identify the multiple uses of the ICAs and IABs.
    • Demonstrate how the different uses of the interim assessments can enhance student and teacher learning.
    • And provide information or train others about the use of the interim assessment viewing system and the hand-scoring system all of the great resources that are part of that system.
    • At this time, take a few seconds to ask participants to discuss with a partner the difference of Assessment FOR Learning and Assessment of Learning, to lead into slides 4 – 5.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 4

1 minute for slides 4 and 5 and total running time is 3 minutes    

Slide intent: This slide is designed to provide a framework for thinking about interim assessments in terms of how they provide information about student learning.
Slide Contents:

Assessment FOR Learning

“Assessment has two fundamental purposes: One is to provide information about student learning minute-by-minute, day-to-day, and week-to-week so teachers can continuously adapt instruction to meet students’ specific needs and secure progress. This type of assessment is intended to assist learning and is often referred to as formative assessment or assessment for learning.”

English Language Arts/English Language Development Framework
for California Public Schools: Kindergarten Through Grade Twelve

Presenter says:
  • I want to take just a minute to frame today’s sessions by reminding us that there are two fundamental purposes of assessment – assessment FOR learning and assessment OF learning.
  • Take a minute to read the quote you see on the slide.
  • Assessment FOR learning is one of two fundamental purposes of student assessments – we assess to obtain information on student learning in order to be able to adapt instruction to meet students’ needs and secure progress.
  • We are going to spend a considerable amount of time today talking about potential uses of the Smarter Balanced Interim Assessment FOR learning – that is using them in more of a formative way rather than in a summative way.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 5

1 minute for slides 4 and 5 and total running time is 3 minutes    

Slide intent: This slide is designed to provide a framework for thinking about interim assessments in terms of how they provide information about student progress.
Slide Contents:

Assessment OF Learning

“A second purpose of assessment is to provide information on students’ current levels of achievement after a period of learning has occurred. Such assessments—which may be classroom-based, districtwide, or statewide—serve a summative purpose and are sometimes referred to as assessments of learning.”

English Language Arts/English Language Development Framework
for California Public Schools: Kindergarten Through Grade Twelve

Presenter says:
  • Now take a minute to read the quote you see on this slide.
  • Assessment OF learning is how we assess to obtain information on students’ current levels of achievement after a period of learning has occurred. The Smarter Balanced interim assessments can do this, as can benchmark assessments that you might have in place at your school or district.
  • Keep these two fundamental purposes of assessment in your mind as the session continues.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 6

4 minutes and total running time is 7 minutes    

Slide intent: This slide is designed to set the stage by thinking about the current use of the interim assessments, and if these uses are standardized or nonstandardized.
Slide Contents:

Setting the Stage

How are the Smarter Balanced Interim Assessments currently being used in your local educational agency (LEA)?

Presenter says:
  • I’d like you to take three minutes to briefly consider the question on the slide at your tables. 
  • Jot your thoughts about current use of the Smarter Balanced Interim Assessments in your school or LEA on a sticky note. Hold on to these as we will revisit them at the end of the session.

(After three minutes the presenter should bring the whole group back together and popcorn around the room to elicit responses from a few tables.)

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 7

2 minutes for slides 7 and 8 and total running time is 9 minutes    

Slide intent: Transition to the discussion of standardized uses of interim assessments.
Slide Contents:

Overview of Interim Assessments and Key Resources

Presenter says:
  • Let’s briefly take a look at some of the main features of the interim assessments.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 8

2 minutes for slides 7 and 8 and total running time is 9 minutes    

Slide intent: Review of the two types of interim assessments available from Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium.
Slide Contents:

Types of Interim Assessments

Interim Comprehensive Assessment (ICAs)

  • 1 per grade level 
  • Results include overall score and claim level information
  • Include hand scoring (local responsibility)

Interim Assessment Blocks (IABs)

  • 6–9 per grade level, for grades 3–8 and HS
  • Results are at the overall block level; no claim information
  • Some include hand scoring (local responsibility)
Presenter says:
  • This slide provides a quick reminder of the two types of interim assessments available for use and their design, including the performance tasks.
  • The interim assessments are specifically designed to provide meaningful information for gauging student progress throughout the year toward mastery of the skills measured by the summative assessments.
  • Interim Comprehensive Assessments (or ICAs) mimic the summative assessment in terms of breadth of content and time required. The ICAs may be helpful for purposes such as determining the knowledge and skills of students who are new to the district or the state, those enrolled in non-tested grades (e.g., grades 9 and 10), and to provide interim information after a significant period of instruction.
  • The Interim Assessment Blocks (or IABs) are focused sets of related concepts in mathematics and English language arts/literacy (ELA). Since the IABs are more granular than the ICAs, teachers can administer them throughout the school year more consistent with their curricula. Please note that although scores are provided for IABs, the smaller size and large error bands provide a very small measurement for performance and should not be interpreted as comprehensive.
  • All ICAs and some IABs have items that require hand scoring. These items may be performance tasks or other constructed response items. Please note that, for both ICAs and IABs, hand scoring is a local responsibility for both the ICAs and IABs.  In order to receive student scores, the computer-based test must be completed and all hand scoring must be done and entered into the system. After hand scoring is entered into the system, results are available within two business days.
  • Hand scoring needs to be carefully planned in order for the interim assessments to be successful, especially if you are planning to administer the interim assessments in a standardized manner and receive scores for all students.
  • If you are just starting to explore the interim assessments, keep in mind that while some of the ELA blocks have hand scoring items, the mathematics ones do not. This allows teachers the opportunity to introduce them by using math blocks without the added time of hand scoring if they choose. The use of the math IABs is a great way to “get your feet wet” with the interim assessments. In fact many districts have followed that approach and then once teachers were familiar with the administration of the interims, they moved on to one that required a small amount of hand scoring. Keep that in mind as we continue through the presentation.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 9

1 minute and total running time is 10 minutes    

Slide intent: This slide’s intent is to review the key features of the interim assessments.
Slide Contents:

Features of Interim Assessments

  • Flexible administration
  • Full array of accessibility supports
  • Aligned with the Common Core State Standards
  • Out-of-grade level use
  • Administered online
  • May be administered more than once
Presenter says:
  • Let’s look at the features of interim assessments:
    • Flexible administration options that better support local purposes. We will talk more about these options in a few minutes.
    • All interim assessments include the same accessibility supports as the summative assessments making them a wonderful resource for students and teachers to practice with various accessibility supports prior to the spring summative assessment window.
    • High quality items that cover the range of Depth Of Knowledge (DOK) described in the Common Core State Standards and are on the same scale as the summative assessments.
    • The interim assessments may be used to measure student knowledge and skills in grade levels other than their enrolled grades. For example, you might use a grade 3 IAB at the beginning of the year with your grade 4 students to get a sense of their baseline knowledge about a topic.
    • Assessments are administered online using the same delivery software as the summative assessments and may be administered multiple times throughout the year.
    • And educators have access to view the test questions and student responses as part of the formative assessment process to address student relative strengths and needs for improvement. We will go into more depth about this feature later in this presentation.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 10

2 minutes and total running time is 12 minutes  

Slide intent: This slide is intended to introduce participants to the Interim Assessment Viewing System.
Slide Contents:

Resources to Support the Use of Interim Assessments

  • Interim Assessment Viewing System
  • Hand Scoring Training Guides and Exemplars
  • Hand Scoring System

Screenshot images of the CAASPP Web site with the URL for the CAASPP website External link opens in new window or tab.

Presenter says:
  • Everything we need to use of the interim assessments for both professional learning and student learning can be accessed from the caaspp.org Web site.
  • I want to focus on two specific resources today – the Interim Assessment Viewing System and the Hand Scoring Training Guides and Exemplars.
  • Through the Interim Assessment Viewing System, teachers can access and view all of the items within any of the Smarter Balanced Interim Assessments.
  • Here are some of the features of the Interim Assessment Viewing System:
    • Teachers can view interim assessments for their own grade or other grades. They want to do this to understand the content assessed at adjacent grades or to determine if an adjacent grade level interim assessment would be more appropriate for a particular group of students.
    • Note that as teachers explore the interim assessments they will need to mark responses in order to navigate from page to page, but their responses do not get recorded.
    • Teachers can access the interim assessments through the viewing system as often as they want or need.
    • LEA CAASPP coordinators, site coordinators, test administrators, text examiners, and interim assessment-only administrators all have the appropriate login credentials to access the interim assessments. Staff with an educator role cannot access this system.
  • How many of you have gone into the Interim Assessment Viewing System to explore the items? (Ask for show of hands)
  • The second area I want to focus on for just a minute is the Hand Scoring Training Guides and Exemplars.
  • The training guides and exemplars, a resource for student responses across performance levels, represent valuable resources that inform teachers of the evidence required for the knowledge about student expectations on the Smarter Balanced assessments.
  • How many of you have reviewed or used one or more of the training guides or the exemplars? (Ask for show of hands)
  • We will come back to both these resources later in the session.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 11

1 minute and total running time is 13 minutes    

Slide intent: The purpose of this slide is to remind participants about the resources available on the CDE Web page to support use of the interim assessments.
Slide Contents:

Resources to Support the Use of Interim Assessments (cont.)

Presenter says:

  • The CDE Web site is a great source for more information about the interim assessments including videos from last year’s CAASPP Institutes that you can use with teacher teams in your school or district.
  • Information about which IABs by grade and subject area available as well as the test blueprints that show the number and types of test items and the specific standards that they address. You’ll also find information on the total items requiring hand scoring for particular IABs.
  • Today’s session is not designed as an overview of interim assessments. If you need or your colleagues need more in depth coverage about the interim assessments, I’d strongly encourage you to check out the videos that are posted from last year’s CAASPP Institutes. There are five separate modules covering specific areas for the interim assessments.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 12

1 minute for slides 12 and 13 and total running time is 14 minutes    

Slide intent: Transition to a discussion about the two ways that interim assessments can be administered.
Slide Contents:

Administration Options for the Interim Assessments

Presenter says:
  • Now that we’ve gone over some of the basic features of the interim assessments and the resources available to support their use, I want to talk about the different ways the interim assessments can be used in classrooms to support teaching and learning.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 13 

1 minute for slides 12 and 13 and total running time is 14 minutes    

Slide intent: The purpose of this slide is to remind participants about two possible manners of administration of the interim assessments.
Slide Content:

Manner of Administration for Interim Assessments

  • Standardized
  • Nonstandardized (system default)
Presenter says:
  • There are two ways of administering the Smarter Balanced Interim Assessments: standardized; and nonstandardized—which is the system default.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 14

3 minutes for slides 14 through 19 and total running time is 16 minutes  

Slide intent: The purpose of this slide is to introduce the standardized manner of administration for the interim assessments.
Slide Contents:

Common Features of Standardized Administration of the Interim Assessments

    • Administered to students individually
    • Typically follows procedures for administration used on summative assessments
    • It may require hand scoring
    • Student performance levels are generated
    • Assessment of learning
Presenter says:
  • Let’s take a moment to consider the some of the considerations associated with the standardized administration of the interim assessments.
  • The standardized manner of administration is typically used when using assessment to measure learning after a period of instruction – or as we learned a few minutes ago – assessment OF learning.
  • Standardized administration involves 1:1 student to computer and typically the same type of procedures followed for the summative assessment are employed.
  • When we talk about standardized administration, what might this look like? Students are working independently. The teacher has prepared the room for administration by covering any items that might be used on the assessment. After the students finish taking the assessment all items requiring hand scoring are recorded, scores are entered into the hand scoring system, and student reports are generated.
  • This can feel like what has become the traditional way that assessments are administered to students because the springtime summative assessments follow this manner of administration.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 15 

3 minutes for slides 14 through 19 and total running time is 16 minutes  

Slide intent: The purpose of this slide is to introduce the nonstandardized manner of administration for the interim assessments.
Slide Contents:

Common Features of Nonstandardized Administration of the Interim Assessments

  • Administration can vary.
    • Individual, partners or small groups, or whole-class administration.
  • Teachers may elect to include some discussion time between test items.
  • Hand scoring may be completed as needed.
  • Student scores are not usually generated.
  • Assessment for learning.
Presenter says:
  • In most cases, the goal of using interim assessments in a nonstandardized manner is not to obtain a score for each and every student. The key here is that this manner of administration focuses on assessment FOR learning. The teachers and students are getting experience with the rigor and item types used in the summative assessment and the teacher is getting a sense of how well the students are succeeding with certain items and where they might be getting stuck.
  • Nonstandardized administration often involves students working together on the interim assessment or the teacher using all or part of an interim assessment, most often an IAB, as part of a classroom exercise or assignment.
  • Teachers may project the IAB items on the screen and work on them as a whole class.
  • In this manner of administration, hand scoring may take place but sometimes hand scoring takes place only for certain student responses—enough for the teacher to have an understanding of success and areas for improvement. We should note here than no matter what manner of administration is used as long as student scores for all hand scored items are entered into the Hand Scoring System, a student score report for the interim assessment will be produced.
  • These results inform changes in the classroom and in the daily instruction that the teacher is providing.
  • We are going to spend time today going through examples of both manners of administration, but focus more intensely on the nonstandardized manner of administration
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 16

3 minutes for slides 14 through 19 and total running time is 16 minutes  

Slide intent: The purpose of this slide is to introduce the manners of administration for the interim assessments.
Slide Contents:

Interim Assessment Manner of Administration Settings

  • Nonstandardized administration is the default.
  • Standardized/Benchmark administration should be selected only if the assessment will be administered in a standardized manner similar to the summative assessment.

Selecting a manner of administration allows educators to know how the assessment was administered and if there can be a valid interpretation of results for students.

Presenter says:
  • The Test Administrator interface for the interim assessment system has a manner of administration setting.
  • It’s important to note that the default setting in the test administration system is nonstandardized. 
  • “Nonstandardized” means that results are not valid for comparison of performance across students or across time. For example:
    • Students were previously exposed to an interim assessment item or test.
    • The appropriate accessibility support was not provided.
    • The interim assessment, if given more than once, was not administered in a consistent manner over time. 
  • In the Standardized/Benchmark administration, the test administrator is identifying which interim assessment results in the interim assessment reporting system are appropriate for potential longitudinal analyses locally.
  • The Standardized/Benchmark setting should be used only if the interim assessment will be administered in a standardized manner.
  • Because all student responses are in the online system, checking a manner of administration is important for interpretation. When nonstandardized administration is selected, school or district administrators know that they should not spend time interpreting those results and making conclusions because those results might not reflect individual student knowledge or skills. This is just one thing we want you to keep in mind when using the system.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 17

3 minutes for slides 14 through 19 and total running time is 16 minutes  

Slide intent: The purpose of this slide is to demonstrate changing the manner of administration in the Testing Interface.
Slide Contents:

Changing the Manner of Administration

Screenshot of the Test Administration Interface

Presenter says:
  • When approving a student’s test setting in the Test Administration Interface click on the “eye” graphic to See Details.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 18

3 minutes for slides 14 through 19 and total running time is 16 minutes  

Slide intent: The purpose of this slide is to demonstrate changing the manner of administration in the Testing Interface.
Slide Contents:

Changing the Manner of Administration

Presenter says:

Click on the dropdown box next to Manner of Administration and choose Standard/Benchmark.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 19

3 minutes for slides 14 through 19 and total running time is 16 minutes

Slide intent: The purpose of this slide is to familiarize participants with how the manner of administration is indicated in the Interim Assessment Reporting System.
Slide Contents:

Screenshot of the Smarter Balanced Assessment Results for Grade 06 showing the system indicator for the Manner of Administration.

Presenter says:
  • In the Interim Assessment Reporting System, there is an indicator that allows you to see, at a glance, whether an assessment was administered for a particular student in a standardized or nonstandardized manner.

(Click)

  • The Standardized/Benchmark “S” icon is present in the Status column for assessments that were administered in a standardized manner.
  • The absence of the “S” icon indicates a nonstandardized administration.
  • Additionally, hovering over the icon displays more information about the manner of administration and overall score. For more information about the manner of administration settings, please refer to the Interim Assessment User Guide linked on the slide.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 20

1 minute for slides 20 and 21 and total running time is 17 minutes    

Slide intent: Transition to the discussion of standardized uses of interim assessments.
Slide Contents:

Standardized Uses of the Smarter Balanced Interim Assessments

Presenter says:
  • Now that we’ve reviewed the general features of standardized and nonstandardized administrations, let’s take a look at some examples of standardized ways to use the interim assessments.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 21

1 minute for slides 20 and 21 and total running time is 17 minutes    

Slide intent: To help participants recognize the different ways in which the IABs may be utilized in a standardized way. 
Slide Contents:

Standardized Uses for the Interim Assessments

  • Diagnostic
  • Pre-Assessment
  • Benchmark
  • Common Assessment

Screenshot of a chart of how the grade 4 math IABs align with the Common Core State Standards

Presenter says:
  • Teachers can employ either the ICAs or IABs concepts at strategic points during the school year to check student progress at mastering specific skills and information. However, please remember that there is only one form for the interim assessments, which means that using them as benchmarks will allow students to see the same items in each testing session.
  • The chart you see on this slide is an example of how the IABs for grade 4 mathematics align with the Common Core State Standards.
Ancillary materials: Notetaking tool

Slide 22

1 minute and total running time is 18 minutes    

Slide intent: To show a sample of how a grid might be used.
Slide Contents:

Example of Standardized Use of the ICAs

Screenshot of a student/class profile for keeping track of student test scores

Presenter says:
  • As we go through the next few slides, feel free to make notes about anything that stands out to you on the provided notetaking tool.

(Provide instructions on where to find the notetaking tool – flash drive or in printed materials.)

  • This is an example of how one elementary school district uses ICAs alongside a number of other assessments to support teaching and learning throughout the year. The district uses the results from the ICAs, in addition to those from math CAASPP and interim assessment, ALEKS, addition, subtraction, and multiplication and division tests, to support teaching and learning throughout the year.
  • Hand grading portions of the test provide teachers an opportunity to familiarize themselves with the types of questions and vocabulary that will be used on the summative assessment. This knowledge allows them to bring the formative assessment process into the classroom as they create opportunities for students to become familiar with the language used in the summative assessment, and thus help students become more successful at the time of testing.
  • Teachers use the results from the ICAs to reteach or reinforce academic concepts before the summative assessment.
  • Last year, the this particular LEA’s administration of the ICAs combined with a new curriculum and some excellent professional development contributed to substantial gains in both content areas – 11 percentage points of improvement in mathematics and 10 percentage points in ELA.
Ancillary materials: Notetaking tool

Slide 23

2 minutes and total running time is 20 minutes  

Slide intent: To highlight how one district, Anaheim Elementary, is utilizing the IABs.
Slide Contents:

Standardized Use of the IABs: Anaheim Elementary School District

  • Three IABs in ELA and math
  • Grades 3–6 
  • 24 elementary schools

Screenshot of the Anaheim Elementary School District IAB example with the URL to the Anaheim 2016 IAB (PDF)

Presenter says:
  • Here is an example of how one district, Anaheim Elementary School District, has used the standardized administration of the IABs to improve teaching and learning during the year.
  • This example comes from the CAASPP In Action report series that is posted on the CDE’s Web site.
  • The district selected three IABs for ELA and three for mathematics to administer to each of their students in grades 3 to 6 in all 24 of their elementary schools.
  • Let me tell you a few of the highlights of their experience:
    • The district found that the high quality test questions provide a framework for educators to use to ask more specific, rigorous questions during classroom instruction.
    • Many teachers realized that their current instruction did not meet the demands of the assessments, and they needed to build bridges between the expectations and the rigor of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and what is currently being done in the classrooms.
    • The teachers compared student written test responses to teacher expectations.  The depth of understanding that teachers were expecting wasn’t being reflected by the student responses.
    • Ultimately the launch of the summative assessment was a familiar activity as students and teachers had been utilizing the system all year with the IABs.
  • It’s important to keep in mind that there are resources available at the CDE Web site that are intended to support the use of IABs in your LEAs. Let’s take a look at a couple of them.

Ancillary materials: Notetaking tool

Slide 24

2 minutes and total running time is 22 minutes  

Screenshots of the Digital Library Connections and Instructional Learning Series with the URL to the Collection Resources

Slide intent: To share with participants available resources on how they can utilize the results of an IAB with resources in the Smarter Balanced Digital Library to enrich, maintain or extend student achievement.
Slide Contents:

Digital Library Resource Collections

  • Instructional Learning Series
  • Digital Library Connections

Screenshots of the Instructional Learning Seris and the Digital Library Connections.

Presenter says:
  • One resource available to help in preparing students to take an IAB is the Instructional Learning Series available on the CDE Web site.
    • The Instructional Learning Series is designed to connect resources in the Digital Library that directly relate to specific Interim Assessment Blocks.
    • The Instructional Learning Series is a California resource created by the California State Network of Educators (SNE).
    • For each resource on the list, a brief description is provided along with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) of focus and estimated instructional time.
    • Many of the formative assessment practices featured in these resources can be used across grades and content areas, so teachers are encouraged to explore all of the resource lists in this series.
    • Right now there are four IABs each for ELA and mathematics for grades 3, 4, 6, and 8, as you see on this slide. California’s SNE continues to work on this project for different grade levels and IABs so check the Web site regularly for new resources.
  • Smarter Balanced has also created a resource called Digital Library Connections, which link student performance on the IABs with resources in the Smarter Balanced Digital Library. This is a resource intended to help you address student needs based on their IAB performance.
    • Each document is organized by student performance (above standard, at/near standard, below standard) and provides specific resources in the Smarter Balanced Digital Library for students at the different performance levels.
    • Educators can use these connections to find relevant and useful instructional supports that are aligned with students' needs.
    • These are developed by Smarter Balanced and can be found on the URL on this slide. Right now the document is available for five IABs in grades five, seven, and eight. As with the Instructional Learning Series, these documents for additional IABs are under development.
  • You may learn more about these resources by attending the Formative Assessment session or referring to the Formative Assessment folder on your CAASPP Institute flash drives.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 25

6 minutes and total running time is 28 minutes  

Slide intent: To give the participants an opportunity to discuss and process the uses of the interim assessments in a standardized manner, as well as the implications of them as a teaching tool specifically in the formative assessment process.
Slide Contents:

How could standardized administration of the ICAs or IABs support teaching and learning in your LEA?

How could the Smarter Balanced Interim Assessments support other assessments currently administered in your LEA?

Presenter says:
  • Take three minutes to discuss with your table partners ideas about how using interim assessments in a standardized manner of administration might support teaching and learning in your districts. We’ve provided you a notetaking sheet to jot down your thoughts.

(After three minutes bring the group back together and ask a few tables to report their ideas to the whole group and then transition to the next slide that introduces nonstandardized uses of the interim assessments.)

Ancillary materials: Notetaking tool

Slide 26

2 minutes for slides 26 through 28 and total running time is 30 minutes  

Slide intent: Transition from standardized to nonstandardized uses of interim assessments.
Slide Contents:

Nonstandardized Uses of the Smarter Balanced Interim Assessments

Presenter says:
  • Non-standardized administration of the interim assessments can be an incredibly powerful tool to improve teaching and learning.
  • We are going to spend the rest of the time today talking about nonstandardized uses for the interim assessments both for professional learning and in the classroom with students.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 27

2 minutes for slides 26 through 28 and total running time is 30 minutes  

Slide intent: This slide is intended to introduce how interim assessments, and the tools and resources that support them, can be used in nonstandardized ways.
Slide Contents:

Benefits of Nonstandardized Uses of the Interim Assessments

  • Inform the formative assessment process and improve student learning
  • Assessment for learning
Presenter says:
  • At the beginning of this session, we talked about the two uses for assessment – assessment OF learning and assessment FOR learning.
  • The common feature of all of the nonstandardized uses of the interim assessment are that they are “assessment FOR learning.” That means that each of these approaches help educators better understand what students know and can do, and can help improve the teaching and learning process, but the approach is not necessarily done with one student in front of one computer. In fact, in some instances students don’t need to be present because but the focus is on the educator professional development.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 28

2 minutes for slides 26 through 28 and total running time is 30 minutes  

Slide intent: This slide is intended to introduce how interim assessments, and the tools and resources that support them, can be used in non-standardized ways.
Slide Contents:

Benefits of Nonstandardized Uses of the Interim Assessments (cont.)

  • Build teacher content knowledge and assessment literacy
  • Familiarize students with the types of test items.
  • Allow teachers opportunities to observe and engage with students about assessment items.
Presenter says:
  • This slide lists a few more of the benefits of using interim assessments in nonstandardized ways.
  • Nonstandardized uses of the interim assessments can be very powerful professional learning experiences for the teacher.
  • There are opportunities for teachers, using the resources provided on CAASPP Portal web page to explore the interim assessment and get familiar with the content, types of questions, and rigor.
  • There are also opportunities to engage students with interim assessment items.
  • Nonstandardized use of the interim assessments also provide opportunities for teachers and students to engage together in the learning process. Teachers can observe students as they are completing items and talk about the parts that were challenging when they are done. All of this can help the teacher improve the classroom instruction for students.
  • As we go through this next set of slides, I’m going to focus on ways that nonstandardized uses of the interim assessments can be used both in and outside of the classroom to support teacher and student learning.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 29

2 minutes for slides 29 through 31and total running time is 32 minutes  

Slide intent: This slide is intended to introduce participants to the interim assessment viewing system.
Slide Contents:

Interim Assessment Viewing System

Screenshot of the CAASPP Interim Assessment Administration Resources webpage with the URL to the Interim Resources External link opens in new window or tab..

Presenter says:
  • Recall earlier in the session I introduced you to the Interim Assessment Viewing System, a great resource for teachers and other educators to explore the interim assessment items.
  • Raise your hand if you have used the Interim Assessment Viewing System.
  • (Make a general comment based on the number of hands in the room that go up.)
  • Let’s talk a little bit more about how it could be used to enhance teaching and learning.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 30

2 minutes for slides 29 through 31and total running time is 32 minutes  

Slide intent: This slide is intended to help participants understand how the viewing system can be used to support professional learning opportunities.
Slide Contents:

Use of the Interim Assessment Viewing System

Supports teachers in:

  • Understanding the content and scope of an interim assessment;
  • Understanding the depth of knowledge of the assessment items; and
  • Making informed decisions about the selection and assignment of accessibility supports for students.
Presenter says:
  • The viewing system provides educators with opportunities for professional learning by allowing them to:
    • Better gauge when to administer a specific interim assessment through aligning the assessment with curriculum. This also involves deciding if one will use an interim assessment as a pretest, post-test, or both, or for another instructional purpose.
    • Determine which grade level interim should be administered.  An example would be selecting a prior year interim assessment to use early in the school year.
  • For teachers, understanding the content and depth of knowledge of an interim assessment could support them in developing learning goals and success criteria to clarify intended learning for students.
  • Another way the Interim Assessment Viewing System helps teachers elicit evidence of student learning within the formative assessment process is by providing models for the kinds of tasks, prompts, and questions teachers can use with students during classroom instruction and on classroom assessments.
  • Teachers also get a chance to view the universal tools, which includes the stimulus expansion tool, “zoom in” and “zoom out” buttons, highlighter, etc. The same universal tools, question types, and navigational features are found on the summative assessments, so by learning about these features on the interims will familiarize teachers with features of the summative assessments and provide information about which tools might be beneficial for which students.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 31

2 minutes for slides 29 through 31 and total running time is 32 minutes  

Slide intent: This slide is intended to help participants understand how the viewing system can be used to support student learning.
Slide Contents:

Use of the Interim Assessment Viewing System (cont.)

Supports student learning by:

  • Becoming familiar with test questions and how to tease apart what the question is asking the student to do; and
  • Discussing the demands and response requirements of the items.
Presenter says:
  • The Interim Assessment Viewing System is for educator use, but it can  also be used with students to support their learning:
    • Teachers can work with students on an item within an instructional context can help students better understand how the Common Core State Standards are assessed, and engage them in discussion about how to “unpack” assessment items to understand what the items are asking and what types of responses might be expected/required.
    • Now let’s spend a little time looking at an item.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 32

6 minutes and total running time is 38 minutes  

Slide intent: This slide is intended to have participants think about the uses of an Interim Assessment Viewing System for teaching or for learning, using the viewing system.
Slide Contents:

Review an Item

  • What is the question asking students to do?
  • What content/standards are being assessed?
  • How is the item being assessed?
  • What Depth of Knowledge is being assessed?
Presenter says:
  • This slide shows one item from a mathematics IAB.
  • This is a model of an approach you can take when working with groups of teachers in your school or school district, or you could adapt the questions on this slide and provide them to teachers as more of a protocol that they could use when working together evaluating items in the Interim Viewing System.
  • You can initiate the conversation by asking questions like:
  • What is this prompt or question asking you to do?
  • What content is being assessed?
  • How is this item being assessed?
  • What DOK is this item at?
  • Some of these questions could be used and others adapted for conversations with students in the classroom.
  • Spend a few minutes at your table talking about:
    • How using items in the Interim Assessment Viewing System helps teachers and how this approach could be used to support professional learning at your school or district and
    • How you might use the Viewing System to support student learning in the classroom.

(After three minutes popcorn around the room asking participants to provide some highlights of the discussions at their tables.)

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 33

1 minute and total running time is 39 minutes    

Slide intent: This slide provides participants with a specific example about using the Interim Assessment Viewing System with educators.
Slide Contents:

Example of How an LEA Might Use the Interim Assessment Viewing System

  • Professional learning:
    • Teachers have reviewed IABs before teaching related units with the intent of identifying appropriate item types and vocabulary to support related classroom activities.
  • In the classroom:
    • As a “warm up” activity with students. Teachers display items on the white board and ask student to work with a partners to come up with an answer. This is followed with a class discussion.
Presenter says:
  • Those were great ideas that were just shared about ways to use the Interim Assessment Viewing System and reviewing items with teachers.
  • Now I’d like to give you a specific example of how one district has been using the Interim Assessment Viewing System both for professional learning with teachers and in the classroom.
  • In Manzanita Elementary School District, a small district in northern California, they have experienced great success at using the Interim Assessment Viewing System in multiple ways.
  • The district has encouraged teachers to review IABs via the Viewing System before teaching related units and asks them to focus on the types of assessment items, the way they are presented to students, and the type of vocabulary used. In this instance, the Interim Assessment Viewing System enhances the teachers lesson plans and may provide new ways to deliver or discuss content to and with students.
  • Teachers are also using the Interim Assessment Viewing System with their students in the classroom as a morning warm up activity.
  • In this case, teachers display one or more items from an IAB on to the white board in the classroom. Students can work individually, in pairs, or in small groups on the answer. After a period of time, the teacher engages with students in a classroom discussion about what the item was asking, the steps involved in answering the item, and what aspects might have presented challenges for students.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 34

8 minutes and total running time is 47 minutes  

Slide intent: This slide is intended to have participants think about the uses of the Interim Assessment Viewing System from both an educator and student perspective.
Slide Contents:

Interim Assessment Viewing System

  • How do you use this tool?
  • How can you suggest this tool be used in a classroom?
Presenter says:

  • Those were great ideas that were just shared about ways to use the Interim Assessment Viewing System and reviewing items with teachers.
  • Now I’d like to give you a specific example of how one district has been using the Interim Assessment Viewing System both for professional learning with teachers and in the classroom.
  • In Manzanita Elementary School District, a small district in northern California, they have experienced great success at using the Interim Assessment Viewing System in multiple ways.
  • The district has encouraged teachers to review IABs via the Viewing System before teaching related units and asks them to focus on the types of assessment items, the way they are presented to students, and the type of vocabulary used. In this instance, the Interim Assessment Viewing System enhances the teachers lesson plans and may provide new ways to deliver or discuss content to and with students.
  • Teachers are also using the Interim Assessment Viewing System with their students in the classroom as a morning warm up activity.
  • In this case, teachers display one or more items from an IAB on to the white board in the classroom. Students can work individually, in pairs, or in small groups on the answer. After a period of time, the teacher engages with students in a classroom discussion about what the item was asking, the steps involved in answering the item, and what aspects might have presented challenges for students.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 35

2 minutes for slides 35 through 37 and total running time is 49 minutes  

Slide intent: This slide is introduces participants to the interim assessment hand scoring materials and how they can be used.
Slide Contents:

Hand Scoring Training Guides and Exemplars

Screenshot of the Interim Assessment Administration Resources Web page

Presenter says:
  • We just spent some time reviewing the Interim Assessment Viewing System and some ways that it can be used to enhance both educator and student learning.
  • Another important resource available as part of the Smarter Balanced Interim Assessment system is the hand scoring system that includes training guides and exemplars.
  • By show of hands, how many of you have used the hand scoring system?

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 36

2 minutes for slides 35 through 37 and total running time is 49 minutes  

Slide intent: This slide is intended to highlight how the hand scoring materials can support professional learning.
Slide Contents:

Hand Scoring Training Guides and Exemplars (cont.)

Guides and exemplars support teachers in:

  • Understanding the requirements of the hand scoring process, including the time needed;
  • Accessing scoring rubrics and student exemplars that demonstrate possible student responses in order to better plan instruction; and
  • Engage in collaboration and communication around common assessment items grounded in standards-based rubrics.
Presenter says:
  • The Interim Assessment Hand scoring materials allow teachers to engage in professional learning to better prepare for and understand their requirements, including the amount of time needed for the hand scoring process.
  • Teachers can learn about the types of items that require hand scoring (specifically the types of constructed-response item that require hand scoring).
  • They can explore the training guides and exemplars to better understand student expectations in order to better plan for student learning. This is an example of Clarify Intended Learning, one of the four attributes of the formative assessment process.
  • In addition, the hand scoring training guides and exemplars can support teacher collaboration and communication around common assessment items grounded in standards-based rubrics.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 37

2 minutes for slides 35 through 37 and total running time is 49 minutes  

Slide intent: This slide is intended to highlight how the hand scoring materials can support support student learning.
Slide Contents:

Hand Scoring Training Guides and Exemplars (cont.)

Support student learning by:

  • demonstrating expectations of the common core standards; and
  • familiarizing students with the rubrics and scoring criteria.

Screenshot of a Brief-Write Rubric Target 6A—Opinion (Elaboration)

Presenter says:
  • Sharing these rubrics with students would support the Clarifying Intended Learning attribute within the formative assessment process.
  • Examples of how the interim assessment hand scoring materials could support teachers and students in clarifying intended learning within the formative assessment process are:
    • Providing a range of student responses that can be used to demonstrate expectations of the common core standards (e.g., high scoring papers) and support designing lessons (e.g., medium scoring papers) focused on improving specific knowledge and skills.
    • Providing student responses that can be used to conduct student-scoring sessions designed to familiarize students with the criteria used in the assessment rubrics.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 38

1 minute and total running time is 50 minutes    

Slide intent: This slide provides participants with a specific example about using the Interim Assessment Viewing System with educators.
Slide Contents:

Example of Using the Training Guides and Exemplars

In the classroom:

    • Teachers have asked students to review the rubrics and sample student answers with the goal of having students think and talk about the kind of response needed to score at each level.
    • After administering an IAB, teachers use the rubrics with students and ask them to think back to how they answered the question and what they would need to do differently to improve performance levels from 1 to 2, or 2 to 3.
Presenter says:
  • Teachers at one of the elementary school districts have also been using the scoring rubrics and sample student responses with students to enhance their instruction.
  • Generally, teachers have been asking students to review the rubrics and sample student responses and talk with each other about what they think it would be needed to score at each level.
  • In classrooms where the IABs have been administered, teachers have also used the rubrics as reflection tools with students. The teacher will ask the students to think back on their answers. In cases where students have access to their responses, whether typed and saved or handwritten, the student can review the response, evaluate it with the rubric, and plan his/her strategy for improvement.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 39

7 minutes and total running time is 57 minutes  

Slide intent: This slide is intended to have participants think about the uses of the hand scoring system and think if these uses result in a standardized or nonstandardized administration (i.e., manner of administration).
Slide Contents:

Hand Scoring Training Guides and Exemplars

  • How do you currently use these tools?
  • How will you envision using these tools for professional development?
  • How do you envision using these tools in the classroom?
Presenter says:
  • For the next five minutes, discuss with your table group what you just learned about the hand scoring training guides and exemplars and consider the two questions on this slide.
  • How do you currently use these tools?
  • How will you envision using these tools for professional development?
  • How do you envision using these tools in the classroom?

(After five minutes, bring the room back together and elicit several responses from the group.)

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 40

1 minute and total running time is 58 minutes    

Slide intent: This slide is intended to provide examples of nonstandardized test administrations.
Slide Contents:

Potential Nonstandardized Uses of the Interim Assessments in the Classroom

  • Students completing an assessment with partners or in collaborative groups
  • Students taking all or part of an assessment individually with a teacher
  • Administering only part of an assessment
  • Administering an out-of-grade assessment to target learning outcomes for specific level or group of students
Presenter says:
  • The example from an elementary school district showed a few ways that teachers are using the interim assessments in nonstandardized ways with students.
  • In talking with teachers we have found that it’s important to provide other examples to get them thinking about how the interim assessments could also be used in their classrooms.
  • Other examples of nonstandardized uses could include:
    • Having students take the test with partners or collaborative groups where they discuss their responses with each other.
    • Having students take all or part of an assessment individually with the teacher, discussing out loud their approaches to the items.
    • Administering only part of an assessment to the whole class or to individual students.  Examples include using only one or two of the brief write items to give students an experience with the expectations of the “on demand” writing task, or administering a portion of an assessment block that is aligned to very specific instructional content.
    • Having students take an assessment from another grade level based on instructional or learning needs, or to provide an experience with a different writing genre (such as a using the grade 6 Argumentative Performance Task with grade 7 students).

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 41

1 minute and total running time is 59 minutes    

Slide intent: This slide is intended to provide a specific nonstandardized use of the interim assessments.
Slide Contents:

Nonstandardized Uses of the Interim Assessments:  Brief Writes

  • Brief Writes is one of the IABs available. This IAB includes six items all of which require hand scoring.
  • Teacher asks all students individually to complete two of the items.
  • Teacher accesses the scoring rubrics via the Hand Scoring resources and scores some papers, but not all.

Presenter says:
  • Brief Writes are short 1 to 2 paragraph responses typically to a passage in which they are referring to.
  • Let’s focus now on a specific nonstandardized use of the Brief Writes IAB.
  • This is a great example if you’re focusing on improving writing skills.
  • In this case, the teacher decides to use the interim assessment as part of the teaching and learning process.
  • The teacher is very interested in seeing individual responses. He/she decides to select two of the six items and provides them to his/her students.
  • After the students complete the items, the teacher accesses the scoring rubrics via the Hand Scoring resources on caaspp.org that we touched on earlier and begins scoring.
  • In any nonstandardized use of the interim assessments there is no expectation that all items are hand scored or that student reports are generated. Sometimes just that simple fact is freeing for educators because it provides them more freedom to decide what and how much is scored.
  • In this example, the teacher begins scoring responses for the first item. He/she decides to score all responses to this item to get a good sense of where his/her students were performing. He/she then moves to the second item and, after scoring about 1/3 of the student response, sees a similar pattern and stops scoring.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 42

1 minute and total running time is 60 minutes    

Slide intent: This slide is intended to introduce the idea of a teacher observation tool that could be used during nonstandardized administration of the interim assessments.
Slide Contents:

Teacher Observation Tools

Presenter says:
  • During nonstandardized administration of the interim assessments, a teacher observation tool has been used successfully in some districts.
  • The one shown on this slide is also on your flash drive. It was developed in the San Juan Unified School District.
  • This tool allows teachers to write down their observation during administration of the interim and could also be useful if grade level teachers were administrating the same interim assessment to their students. Each teacher could individually record their observations and then bring the tool with them to their collaboration time where they could discuss what they saw and use that information in their discussions about how to modify their classroom instruction.
  • Other tools could be used as well. There is really no one right tool for this experience – the key is that teachers are recording their observations and using those observations to change classroom practice to improve teaching and learning.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 43

1 minute and total running time is 61 minutes    

Slide intent: This slide is intended to introduce how nonstandardized test administrations can support student learning.
Slide Contents:

Engage with Students

  • How students approached/solved assessment items
  • The types of items that were more challenging or presented issues for students

Screenshot of easel piece of paper with student observations about the interim assessments written down

Presenter says:
  • Discussing the interim assessment experience with students can also support teaching and learning.
  • San Juan Unified School District also encouraged teachers to discuss the experience with students and ask for their observations.
  • The screenshot of the easel piece of paper is a very simple approach to use.
  • The key is that students are part of this experience that their voice is important to the overall process.

San Juan Unified uses this approach after students took the performance task and the students had some very interesting observations to make. Teachers in turn muse these student observations in collaborative conversations aimed at improving teaching and learning.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 44

2 minutes and total running time is 63 minutes  

Slide intent: This slide is intended to provide ideas for promoting the use of interim assessments at the LEAs.
Slide Contents:

Keys in Promoting Use of the Interim Assessments

  • Encourage exploration
  • Focus on low-stakes environment
  • Start slow
  • Keep hand scoring minimal at first
  • Consider supplementing existing activities and/or assessments with the interim assessments
  • Allow teachers the freedom to choose
Presenter says:
  • Districts throughout California have taken a variety of approaches to implementing the interim assessments with their students.
  • As you saw earlier in this session, some have decided to use either the ICAs or IABs in standardized ways as benchmark assessments. Oftentimes these assessments are used to supplement the existing assessments used by the LEA.
  • Just as important are the various nonstandardized uses of the interim assessments.
  • Throughout the slides and the accompanying discussion I know you all thought about several different ways that you could use the interim assessments back in your school or school district to encourage improvements in teaching and learning.
  • This slide provides a few reminders that we have learned from the experiences of school districts around the state.
  • Encouraging exploration is a good starting point. Think about making an assignment to the staff to go in to the Interim Assessment Viewing System and look through one IAB. Over time, as teachers become more familiar and comfortable, you can build on this assignment. If your district is encouraging nonstandardized uses, remind teachers that this is a low-stakes environment following the principle of assessment FOR learning.
  • Start slow and build success over time. Some districts have found that by asking teachers to administer just one IAB, teachers were influenced by the information that they learned that on their own they decided to administer more. We have found that often the small start leads to greater outcomes in the end that a large ask of teachers up front.
  • If you can, keep hand scoring minimal in your first experiences. The hand scoring experience can be daunting for some teachers. You might consider starting with an IAB in mathematics that requires no hand scoring or one that requires hand scoring of only one to two items. This gives the teachers experience with the hand scoring resources – the training guides and the exemplars – but it doesn’t become overwhelming.
  • Consider replacing existing classroom assignments or assessments with an interim assessment.
  • Or consider enhancing your current district assessments with one or more of the interim assessments. San Juan Unified, the district we talked about just a few minutes ago has been administering another common benchmark assessment. Rather than replace that existing assessment, they decided to augment it with the performance task IAB. The existing district assessment is multiple choice only so they chose the performance task to provide teachers with additional information about student performance.
  • Can anyone share additional ways they’ve successfully promoted the use of interim assessments in their LEAs?
  • (Allow for one or two participants to share before transitioning to the next slide.)
  • No matter what approach you take, if you implement it thoughtfully and with attention to other district assessment practices, I think you will find that teachers will embrace the Smarter Balanced interim assessments and continue to find ways to integrate parts and pieces of them into their daily classroom practice.

Ancillary materials: none

Slide 45

2 minutes and total running time is 65 minutes  

Quote with the URL for the Sierra Sands Unified School District CAASPP In Action Series (PDF)

Slide intent: This slide is intended share one district’s experience with nonstandardized administration of the interim assessments.
Slide Contents:

One District’s Experience

During districtwide training as the idea of “assessment FOR learning” was discussed, the training team could literally see the stress drain out of people’s faces. This was a huge “ah-ha” moment for the district and a significant turning point in their work on CAASPP implementation

--Sierra Sands Unified School District CAASPP in Action series (PDF)

Presenter says:
  • I want to close this part of the session with a quote from one of the districts that was profiled in the CAASPP In Action report series published on the CDE Web site, and features the Sierra Sands Unified School District.
  • Sierra Sands team members attended the CAASPP Institutes last year with a team and embraced the idea of assessment FOR learning. They took that idea back to their district and implemented the IABs districtwide. Their teachers were so concerned about the high stakes nature of assessment coming off of years under No Child Left Behind that this exploration approach was critical to their success.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 46 

2 minutes and total running time is 65 minutes  

Slide intent: This slide is intended to describe one district’s experience with nonstandardized administration of the interim assessments.
Slide Contents:

CAASPP In Action: Sierra Sands Unified

  • Teachers were asked to select two IABs of their choosing by exploring them via the Interim Assessment Viewing System.
  • They did this by utilizing the existing protected collaboration time.
  • They engaged in collaborative conversations focused on what changes needed to take place in the classrooms to match the rigor of the assessments.
Presenter says:
  • In Sierra Sands, teachers were asked to select two IABs to administer in their classrooms. Teachers were provided with information about the Interim Assessment Viewing System so that they could explore the various options and make informed choices about which IABs might be the best for their classrooms. The freedom of choice for teachers was huge for Sierra Sands.
  • Oftentimes the district found that teachers at the same grade level got together and chose the same IABs so that they could come back together during weekly collaboration time to discuss their observations and student results.
  • One of the key conversations that took place among elementary teachers was the realization that their students aren’t being exposed regularly to the “bottom-of-the-page” questions on math worksheets— those that focus more on mathematical reasoning, problem solving and critical thinking skills. These conversations lead to an improvement in daily classroom practices and increased success for students.
  • These observations drive future professional development in helping teachers identify strategies for working with students on more rigorous concepts, procedure,  and problem solving skills.
  • One of the next steps for Sierra Sands is to continue to support teachers in the voluntary use of the interim assessments and emphasize the performance tasks focusing on supporting teachers develop their own performance tasks after exploring and learning about the ones provided by Smarter Balanced.
  • Be sure to check out Sierra Sands entire experience in the CAASPP in Action report series at the URL on the previous slide.
  • Before we finish discussing interim assessments for today, let’s take a few minutes to strategizing how to translate what we just learned into practice at your LEAs.
Ancillary materials: none

Slide 47   

10 minutes and total running time is 75 minutes

Slide intent: This slide is intended to provide attendees with an opportunity to consider standardized and nonstandardized uses of the interim assessments in their LEAs.
Slide Contents:

Implementation Planning

Screenshot of the Implementation Planning Tool

Presenter says:
  • Now you will have some time to work alone or with any other members of your team who are with you today in this session.
  • Similar to what you have used in other sessions, there is a planning tool specific for this session in your binder and also on your flash drive.
  • Let’s spend just a minute going over the tool and then you’ll have the rest of the time to brainstorm about how to put the interim assessments into practice at your school or school district.

Ancillary materials: Notetaking tool, Planning tool

Slide 48  

10 minutes and total running time is 75 minutes

Slide intent: This slide is intended to close the session.
Slide Contents:

Thank You!

Presenter says:
  • Thank you for your active participation in our session on Using Interim Assessments to Support Teaching and Learning Throughout the Year. 
  • We hope you have had an opportunity to enhance your understanding of how interim assessments can be used in standardized and nonstandardized ways to support, teaching, learning and professional development.

Ancillary materials: none

Questions:   California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress | caaspp@cde.ca.gov | 916-445-8765
Last Reviewed: Tuesday, September 18, 2018
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