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LCAP Federal Addendum

Local educational agencies applying for ESSA funds must complete the LCAP Federal Addendum (Addendum) as part of meeting the requirements for the ESSA LEA Plan. This page provides guidance to support the completion of the Addendum.

LCAP Federal Addendum Webinar Presentation Slides (PDF) | Instructions | Strategy | Alignment | ESSA Provisions Addressed Within the LCAP | ESSA Provisions Addressed in the Consolidated Application and Reporting System | ESSA Provisions Not Addressed in the LCAP

Instructions

The LCAP Federal Addendum is meant to supplement the LCAP to ensure that eligible LEAs have the opportunity to meet the Local Educational Agency (LEA) Plan provisions of the ESSA.

The LCAP Federal Addendum Template must be completed and submitted to the California Department of Education (CDE) to apply for ESSA funding. LEAs are encouraged to review the LCAP Federal Addendum annually with their LCAP, as ESSA funding should be considered in yearly strategic planning.

The LEA must address the Strategy and Alignment prompts provided on the following page.

Each provision for each program must be addressed, unless the provision is not applicable to the LEA.

In addressing these provisions, LEAs must provide a narrative that addresses the provision within the LCAP Federal Addendum Template.

Under State Priority Alignment, state priority numbers are provided to demonstrate where an ESSA provision aligns with state priorities. This is meant to assist LEAs in determining where ESSA provisions may already be addressed in the LEA’s LCAP, as it demonstrates the LEA’s efforts to support the state priorities.

The CDE emphasizes that the LCAP Federal Addendum should not drive LCAP development. ESSA funds are supplemental to state funds, just as the LCAP Federal Addendum supplements your LCAP. LEAs are encouraged to integrate their ESSA funds into their LCAP development as much as possible to promote strategic planning of all resources; however, this is not a requirement. In reviewing the LCAP Federal Addendum, staff will evaluate the LEA’s responses to the ESSA plan provisions. There is no standard length for the responses. LEAs will be asked to clarify insufficient responses during the review process.

California’s ESSA State Plan significantly shifts the state’s approach to the utilization of federal resources in support of underserved student groups. This LCAP Federal Addendum provides LEAs with the opportunity to document their approach to maximizing the impact of federal investments in support of underserved students.

The implementation of ESSA in California presents an opportunity for LEAs to innovate with their federally-funded programs and align them with the priority goals they are realizing under the state’s Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF).

LCFF provides LEAs flexibility to design programs and provide services that meet the needs of students in order to achieve readiness for college, career, and lifelong learning. The LCAP planning process supports continuous cycles of action, reflection, and improvement.

Please respond to the prompts to describe the LEA’s plan for making the best use of federal ESEA resources in alignment with other federal, state, and local programs as described in the LEA’s LCAP. There is no standard length for responses, but there is a limit of 5,000 characters, so do be brief and direct in your replies.

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Strategy

LEAs must respond to the following prompt:

Explain the LEA’s strategy for using federal funds to supplement and enhance local priorities or initiatives funded with state funds, as reflected in the LEA’s LCAP. This shall include describing the rationale/evidence for the selected use(s) of federal funds within the context of the LEA’s broader strategy reflected in the LCAP.

Alignment

LEAs must respond to the following prompt:

Describe the efforts that the LEA will take to align use of federal funds with activities funded by state and local funds and, as applicable, across different federal grant programs.

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ESSA Provisions Addressed Within the LCAP

Title I, Part A

Monitoring Student Progress Towards Meeting Challenging State Academic Standards

ESSA Section 1112(b)(1) (A–D); State Priority Alignment: 1, 2, 4, 7, 8 (as applicable)

Overuse in Discipline Practices that Remove Students from the Classroom

ESSA Section 1112(b)(11); State Priority Alignment: 6 (as applicable)

Career Technical and Work-based Opportunities

ESSA Section 1112(b)(12)(A–B); State Priority Alignment: 2, 4, 7 (as applicable)

Title II, Part A

Title II, Part A Activities

ESSA Section 2102(b)(2)(A); State Priority Alignment: 1, 2, 4 (as applicable)

Title III, Part A

Parent, Family, and Community Engagement

ESSA Section 3116(b)(3); State Priority Alignment: 3, 6 (as applicable)

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ESSA Provisions Addressed in the Consolidated Application and Reporting System

An LEA addresses the following ESSA provision as part of completing annual reporting through the Consolidated Application and Reporting System (CARS).

Title I, Part A

Poverty Criteria

ESSA Section 1112(b)(4)

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ESSA Provisions Not Addressed in the LCAP

The ESSA provisions listed below do not align with state priorities. Each provision for each program provided listed below must be addressed, unless the provision is not applicable to the LEA. In addressing these provisions, LEAs must provide a narrative that addresses the provision within this addendum.

The CDE emphasizes that the LCAP Federal Addendum should not drive LCAP development. ESSA funds are supplemental to state funds, just as the LCAP Federal Addendum supplements your LCAP. LEAs are encouraged to integrate their ESSA funds into their LCAP development as much as possible to promote strategic planning of all resources; however, this is not a requirement. In reviewing the LCAP Federal Addendum, staff will evaluate the LEA’s responses to the ESSA plan provisions.

There is no standard length for the responses. LEAs will be asked to clarify insufficient responses during the review process.

Title I, Part A

Educator Equity
ESSA Section 1112(b)(2)

Describe how the LEA will identify and address, as required under State plans as described in Section 1111(g)(1)(B), any disparities that result in low-income students and minority students being taught at higher rates than other students by ineffective, inexperienced, or out-of-field teachers.

Guidance and Questions

Educator Equity: LCAP Addendum Criteria & Guidance

For questions and additional resources, please contact the Teacher and Leader Policy Office at TLPO@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 445-7331.

Parent and Family Engagement
ESSA Sections 1112(b)(3) and 1112(b)(7)

Describe how the LEA will carry out its responsibility under Section 1111(d).

Describe the strategy the LEA will use to implement effective parent and family engagement under Section 1116.

Guidance

To meet this requirement, LEAs must provide a description of the following:

ESSA Section 1112(b)(3): how the LEA will carry out its responsibilities under paragraphs (1) and (2) of Section 1111(d);

  • How the LEA will involve parents and family members at identified schools in jointly developing Comprehensive Support and Improvement plans
  • How the LEA will involve parents and family members in identified schools in jointly developing the Targeted Support and Improvement plans
  • In the absence of the identification of any schools for Comprehensive Support and Improvement (CSI) or any schools for Targeted Assistance and Intervention (TSI), the LEA may write N/A. This provision will not be reviewed.

ESSA Section 1112(b)(7): the strategy the LEA will use to implement effective parent and family engagement under Section 1116; shall include how the LEA and its schools will build capacity for parent and family engagement by:

  • Describe the LEA parent and family engagement policy, how it was developed jointly with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents and family members of participating children a written parent and family engagement policy (ESSA Section 1116(a)).
  • Describe how the LEA will provide assistance to parents of children served by the school or local educational agency, as appropriate, in understanding such topics as the challenging State academic standards, State and local academic assessments, the requirements of this part, and how to monitor a child’s progress and work with educators to improve the achievement of their children;  (ESSA Section 1116(e)(1))
  • Describe how the LEA will provide materials and training to help parents to work with their children to improve their children’s achievement, such as literacy training and using technology (including education about the harms of copyright piracy), as appropriate, to foster parental involvement; (ESSA Section 1116(e)(2))
  • Describe how the LEA will educate teachers, specialized instructional support personnel, principals, and other school leaders, and other staff, with the assistance of parents, in the value and utility of contributions of parents, and in how to reach out to, communicate with, and work with parents as equal partners, implement and coordinate parent programs, and build ties between parents and the school; (ESSA Section 1116(e)(3))
  • Describe how the LEA will to the extent feasible and appropriate, coordinate and integrate parent involvement programs and activities with other Federal, State, and local programs, including public preschool programs, and conduct other activities, such as parent resource centers, that encourage and support parents in more fully participating in the education of their children; (ESSA Section 1116(e)(4))
  • Describe how the LEA will ensure that information related to school and parent programs, meetings, and other activities is sent to the parents of participating children in a format and, to the extent practicable, in a language the parents can understand (ESSA Section 1116(e)(5))
  • Describe how the LEA will provide such other reasonable support for parental involvement activities as parents may request (ESSA Section 1116(e)(14).
  • Describe how the LEA will provide opportunities for the informed participation of parents and family members (including parents and family members who have limited English proficiency, parents and family members with disabilities, and parents and family members of migratory children), including providing information and school reports in a format and, to the extent practicable, in a language such parents understand (ESSA Section 1116(f)).

Also include how the LEA will align parent involvement required in Section 1116 with the LCAP stakeholder engagement process.

Questions

For questions regarding Title I, Part A, Parent and Family Engagement, please contact Janine Clements, Education Programs Assistance, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at JClements@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 445-4904.

Schoolwide Programs, Targeted Support Programs, and Programs for Neglected or Delinquent Children
ESSA Sections 1112(b)(5) and 1112(b)(9)

Describe, in general, the nature of the programs to be conducted by the LEA’s schools under sections 1114 and 1115 and, where appropriate, educational services outside such schools for children living in local institutions for neglected or delinquent children, and for neglected and delinquent children in community day school programs.

Describe how teachers and school leaders, in consultation with parents, administrators, paraprofessionals, and specialized instructional support personnel, in schools operating a targeted assistance school program under Section 1115, will identify the eligible children most in need of services under this part.

Guidance

To meet this requirement, LEAs must provide a description of the following:

ESSA Section 1112(b)(5): in general, the nature of the programs to be conducted by such agency’s schools under sections Schoolwide Programs pursuant to1114 and Targeted Assistance Schools pursuant to 1115 and, where appropriate, educational services outside such schools for children living in local institutions for neglected or delinquent children, and for neglected and delinquent children in community day school programs.

ESSA Section 1112(b)(9): how teachers and school leaders, in consultation with parents, administrators, paraprofessionals, and specialized instructional support personnel, in schools operating a targeted assistance school program under Section 1115, will identify the eligible children most in need of services under this part.

Questions

For questions regarding the Title I, Part A, Neglected or Delinquent program, please contact Karen Steinhaus, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at KSteinhaus@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0946.

For questions regarding the Title I, Part A, Targeted Assisted program, please contact Lana Zhou, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at LZhou@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0956.

Homeless Children and Youth Services
ESSA Section 1112(b)(6)

Describe the services the LEA will provide homeless children and youths, including services provided with funds reserved under Section 1113(c)(3)(A), to support the enrollment, attendance, and success of homeless children and youths, in coordination with the services the LEA is providing under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 United States Code 11301 et seq.).

Guidance

To meet this requirement, LEAs must provide a description of the following:

ESSA Section 1112(b)(6): the services the LEA will provide homeless children and youths, including services provided with funds reserved under Section 1113(c)(3)(A), to support the (1) enrollment, (2) attendance, and (3) success of homeless children and youths, in coordination with the services the LEA is providing under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11301 et seq.).

Questions

For questions regarding Title I, Part A, Homeless Reservation, please contact Lana Zhou, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at LZhou@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0956.

Student Transitions
ESSA Sections 1112(b)(8) and 1112(b)(10) (A–B)

Describe, if applicable, how the LEA will support, coordinate, and integrate services provided under this part with early childhood education programs at the LEA or individual school level, including plans for the transition of participants in such programs to local elementary school programs.

Describe, if applicable, how the LEA will implement strategies to facilitate effective transitions for students from middle grades to high school and from high school to postsecondary education including:

  • through coordination with institutions of higher education, employers, and other local partners; and
  • through increased student access to early college high school or dual or concurrent enrollment opportunities, or career counseling to identify student interests and skills.

Guidance

To meet this requirement, LEAs must provide a description of the following:

ESSA Section 1112(b)(8): if applicable, how the LEA will support, coordinate, and integrate services provided under this part with early childhood education programs at the LEA or individual school level, including plans for the transition of participants in such programs to local elementary school programs.

ESSA Section 1112(b)(10): how the LEA will implement strategies to facilitate effective transitions for students from middle grades to high school and from high school to postsecondary education including, if applicable—

  • Through coordination with institutions of higher education, employers, and other local partners; and
  • Through increased student access to early college high school or dual or concurrent enrollment opportunities, or career counseling to identify student interests and skills.

Questions

For questions regarding Title I, Part A, Early Childhood Education, please contact Patricia Ramirez, Education Programs Assistant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at PRamirez@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0787.

For questions regarding Title I, Part A, Transition Program, please contact Lana Zhou, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at LZhou@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0956.

Additional Information Regarding Use of Funds Under this Part
ESSA Section 1112(b)(13) (A–B)

Provide any other information on how the LEA proposes to use funds to meet the purposes of this part, and that the LEA determines appropriate to provide, which may include how the LEA will:

  • assist schools in identifying and serving gifted and talented students; and
  • assist schools in developing effective school library programs to provide students an opportunity to develop digital literacy skills and improve academic achievement.

Guidance and Questions

To meet this requirement, LEAs must provide a description of the following:

ESSA Section 1112(b)(13): any other information on how the LEA proposes to use funds to meet the purposes of this part, and that the LEA determines appropriate to provide, which may include how the LEA will—

  • Assist schools in identifying and serving gifted and talented students; and
  • Assist schools in developing effective school library programs to provide students an opportunity to develop digital literacy skills and improve academic achievement.

For questions regarding Title I, Part A, Transition Program, please contact Lana Zhou, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at LZhou@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0956.

Title I, Part D

Description of Program
ESSA Section 1423(1)

Provide a description of the program to be assisted by Title I, Part D.

Guidance and Questions

For guidance regarding Title I, Part D, Neglected or Delinquent program, please contact Karen Steinhaus, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at KSteinhaus@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0946.

Formal Agreements
ESSA Section 1423(2)

Provide a description of formal agreements, regarding the program to be assisted, between the

  • LEA; and
  • correctional facilities and alternative school programs serving children and youth involved with the juvenile justice system, including such facilities operated by the Secretary of the Interior and Indian tribes.

Guidance and Questions

For guidance regarding Title I, Part D, Neglected or Delinquent program, please contact Karen Steinhaus, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at KSteinhaus@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0946.

Comparable Education Program
ESSA Section 1423(3)

As appropriate, provide a description of how participating schools will coordinate with facilities working with delinquent children and youth to ensure that such children and youth are participating in an education program comparable to one operating in the local school such youth would attend.

Guidance and Questions

For guidance regarding Title I, Part D, Neglected or Delinquent program, please contact Karen Steinhaus, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at KSteinhaus@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0946.

Successful Transitions
ESSA Section 1423(4)

Provide a description of the program operated by participating schools to facilitate the successful transition of children and youth returning from correctional facilities and, as appropriate, the types of services that such schools will provide such children and youth and other at-risk children and youth.

Guidance and Questions

For guidance regarding Title I, Part D, Neglected or Delinquent program, please contact Karen Steinhaus, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at KSteinhaus@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0946.

Educational Needs
ESSA Section 1423(5)

Provide a description of the characteristics (including learning difficulties, substance abuse problems, and other special needs) of the children and youth who will be returning from correctional facilities and, as appropriate, other at-risk children and youth expected to be served by the program, and a description of how the school will coordinate existing educational programs to meet the unique educational needs of such children and youth.

Guidance and Questions

For guidance regarding Title I, Part D, Neglected or Delinquent program, please contact Karen Steinhaus, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at KSteinhaus@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0946.

Social, Health, and Other Services
ESSA Section 1423(6)

As appropriate, provide a description of how schools will coordinate with existing social, health, and other services to meet the needs of students returning from correctional facilities, at-risk children or youth, and other participating children or youth, including prenatal health care and nutrition services related to the health of the parent and the child or youth, parenting and child development classes, child care, targeted reentry and outreach programs, referrals to community resources, and scheduling flexibility.

Guidance and Questions

For guidance regarding Title I, Part D, Neglected or Delinquent program, please contact Karen Steinhaus, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at KSteinhaus@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0946.

Postsecondary and Workforce Partnerships
ESSA Section 1423(7)

As appropriate, provide a description of any partnerships with institutions of higher education or local businesses to facilitate postsecondary and workforce success for children and youth returning from correctional facilities, such as through participation in credit-bearing coursework while in secondary school, enrollment in postsecondary education, participation in career and technical education programming, and mentoring services for participating students.

Guidance and Questions

For guidance regarding Title I, Part D, Neglected or Delinquent program, please contact Karen Steinhaus, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at KSteinhaus@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0946.

Parent and Family Involvement
ESSA Section 1423(8)

As appropriate, provide a description of how the program will involve parents and family members in efforts to improve the educational achievement of their children, assist in dropout prevention activities, and prevent the involvement of their children in delinquent activities.

Guidance and Questions

For guidance regarding Title I, Part D, Neglected or Delinquent program, please contact Karen Steinhaus, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at KSteinhaus@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0946.

Program Coordination
ESSA Section 1423(9–10)

Provide a description of how the program under this subpart will be coordinated with other Federal, State, and local programs, such as programs under title I of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and career and technical education programs serving at-risk children and youth.

Include how the program will be coordinated with programs operated under the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 and other comparable programs, if applicable.

Guidance and Questions

For guidance regarding Title I, Part D, Neglected or Delinquent program, please contact Karen Steinhaus, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at KSteinhaus@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0946.

Probation Officer Coordination
ESSA Section 1423(11)

As appropriate, provide a description of how schools will work with probation officers to assist in meeting the needs of children and youth returning from correctional facilities.

Guidance and Questions

For guidance regarding Title I, Part D, Neglected or Delinquent program, please contact Karen Steinhaus, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at KSteinhaus@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0946.

Individualized Education Program Awareness
ESSA Section 1423(12)

Provide a description of the efforts participating schools will make to ensure correctional facilities working with children and youth are aware of a child’s or youth’s existing individualized education program.

Guidance and Questions

For guidance regarding Title I, Part D, Neglected or Delinquent program, please contact Karen Steinhaus, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at KSteinhaus@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0946.

Alternative Placements
ESSA Sections 1423(13)

As appropriate, provide a description of the steps participating schools will take to find alternative placements for children and youth interested in continuing their education but unable to participate in a traditional public school program.

Guidance and Questions

For guidance regarding Title I, Part D, Neglected or Delinquent program, please contact Karen Steinhaus, Education Programs Consultant, in the Title I Policy and Program Guidance Office at KSteinhaus@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0946.

Title II, Part A

Professional Growth and Improvement
ESSA Section 2102(b)(2)(B)

Provide a description of the LEA’s systems of professional growth and improvement, such as induction for teachers, principals, or other school leaders and opportunities for building the capacity of teachers and opportunities to develop meaningful teacher leadership.

Guidance and Questions

Title II, Part A LCAP Addendum Criteria & Guidance

For questions and additional resources, please contact the Educator Excellence and Equity Division at EEED@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 323-6440.

Prioritizing Funding
ESSA Section 2102(b)(2)(C)

Provide a description of how the LEA will prioritize funds to schools served by the agency that are implementing comprehensive support and improvement activities and targeted support and improvement activities under Section 1111(d) and have the highest percentage of children counted under Section 1124(c).

Guidance and Questions

Title II, Part A LCAP Addendum Criteria & Guidance

For questions and additional resources, please contact the Educator Excellence and Equity Division at EEED@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 323-6440.

Data and Ongoing Consultation to Support Continuous Improvement
ESSA Section 2102(b)(2)(D)

Provide a description of how the LEA will use data and ongoing consultation described in Section 2102(b)(3) to continually update and improve activities supported under this part.

Guidance and Questions

Title II, Part A LCAP Addendum Criteria & Guidance

For questions and additional resources, please contact the Educator Excellence and Equity Division at EEED@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 323-6440.

Title III, Part A

Title III Professional Development
ESSA Section 3115(c)(2)

Describe how the eligible entity will provide effective professional development to classroom teachers, principals and other school leaders, administrators, and other school or community-based organizational personnel.

Criteria

To meet this requirement, LEAs must provide a description of the following:

  • The LEA’s effective professional development for classroom teachers, principals and other school leaders, administrators, and other school or community-based organizational personnel.

Complete responses will:

  • Address professional development activities specific to ELs/Title III purposes that are:
    • designed to improve the instruction and assessment of English learners;
    • designed to enhance the ability of such teachers, principals, and other school leaders to understand and implement curricula, assessment practices and measures, and instructional strategies for English learners;
    • effective in increasing children's English language proficiency or substantially increasing the subject matter knowledge, teaching knowledge, and teaching skills of such teachers; and
    • of sufficient intensity and duration (which shall not include activities such as one-day or short-term workshops and conferences) to have a positive and lasting impact on the teachers' performance in the classroom

Guidance

In meeting this requirement, LEAs are encouraged to review the alignment External link opens in new window or tab. (PDF) between their Title III professional growth and improvement systems to California’s Quality Professional Learning Standards External link opens in new window or tab. (PDF). Descriptions of high-quality professional growth and improvement systems will address:

  • Data: Sources and kinds of information that guide professional learning (PL) priorities, design, and assessments.
  • Content and Pedagogy: Ways in which PL system enhances educators’ expertise to increase students’ capacity to learn and thrive.
  • Equity: How the PL system addresses equitable access, opportunities, and outcomes for all students, with an emphasis on addressing achievement and opportunity disparities between student groups.
  • Design and Structure: Use of evidence-based approaches such as focused, sustained learning that enables educators to acquire, implement, and assess improved practices.
  • Collaboration and Shared Accountability: How PL facilitates the development of a shared purpose for student learning and collective responsibility for achieving it.
  • Resources: The dedicated resources for PL and how they are adequate, accessible, and allocated appropriately toward established priorities and outcomes.
  • Alignment and Coherence: How the PL contributes to a coherent system of educator learning and support that connects district and school priorities and needs with state and federal requirements and resources.

Questions

For questions and additional resources, please contact the Language Policy and Leadership Office at (916) 319-0845.

Enhanced Instructional Opportunities
ESSA Sections 3115(e)(1) and 3116

Describe how the eligible entity will provide enhanced instructional opportunities for immigrant children and youth.

Criteria

To meet this requirement, LEAs must provide a description of the following:

  • How the LEA provides enhanced instructional opportunities for immigrant children and youth.

Complete responses will:

  • Describe the supplemental activities implemented that provide enhanced instructional opportunities for immigrant children and youth

Guidance

In its process to provide enhanced instructional opportunities for immigrant children and youth, LEAs should consider:

  • The authorized uses of Title III, Part A Immigrant funding.
  • How the LEA meaningfully consults with the following stakeholders regarding prioritizing Title III, Part A Immigrant funding for high needs schools:
    • Teachers
    • Principals and other school leaders
    • Paraprofessionals
    • Specialized instructional support personnel
    • Parents
    • Community partners
    • Organizations or partners with relevant and demonstrated expertise in programs and activities
  • How Title III, Part A Immigrant funding will be used strategically with other funding streams to support Title III immigrant activities.
  • How the LEA considers sustainability for activities supported by Title III, Part A Immigrant funding.

Questions

For questions and additional resources, please contact the Language Policy and Leadership Office at (916) 319-0845.

Title III Programs and Activities
ESSA Section 3116(b)(1)

Describe the effective programs and activities, including language instruction educational programs, proposed to be developed, implemented, and administered under the subgrant that will help English learners increase their English language proficiency and meet the challenging State academic standards.

Criteria

To meet this requirement, LEAs must provide a description of the following:

  • How the LEA develops, implements, and administers effective programs and activities, including language instruction educational programs, to help English learners increase English language proficiency and meet the challenging state academic standards.

 

Complete responses will:

  • Address the effectivelanguage instruction programs specific to English learners.
  • Address the activities, focused on English learners and consistent with the purposes of Title III, that supplement the core program.

Guidance

As an LEA reviews its processes for developing, implementing, and administering effective programs and activities to continuously improve Title III, Part A activities, it should consider:

  • The authorized uses of Title III, Part A English learner funding.
  • How the LEA meaningfully consults with the following stakeholders regarding prioritizing Title III, Part A English learner funding for high needs schools:
    • Teachers
    • Principals and other school leaders
    • Paraprofessionals
    • Specialized instructional support personnel
    • Parents
    • Community partners
    • Organizations or partners with relevant and demonstrated expertise in programs and activities
  • How Title III, Part A English learner funding will be used strategically with other funding streams to support Title III immigrant activities.
  • How the LEA considers sustainability for activities supported by Title III, Part A English learner funding.
  • Outreach to a diverse representation of stakeholders from across the LEA, especially those who work in high-needs schools and in early education, during the development of plans for Title III, Part A funds.
  • Flexible consultation with stakeholders by holding meetings or conferences outside the regular school day hours or by using a variety of communications tools, such as electronic surveys.
  • Informing stakeholders of past and current uses of Title III, Part A funds, and their effectiveness, as well as research or analysis of the new uses being proposed.
  • Adapting consultation materials to specific stakeholder audiences.
  • Genuinely considering concerns identified during the consultation and addressing those concerns with concrete explanations and plans.
  • What are reasonable expectations for success and how can success be measured?
  • What are interim progress and performance milestones that can be tracked?
  • Is there the need or capacity to examine the effectiveness of activities through research or correlational study, or would use of performance data suffice?
  • Are the necessary data being collected and examined at the right frequency to monitor performance and make needed adjustments? Are the data high quality? Are specific populations and subgroups being considered such as long-term English learners, etc.?
  • What have participants in the activities shared about their experience and how the activities were implemented?
  • How could knowledge about these activities be shared with the variety of stakeholders and inform future decision-making?
  • What do stakeholders think the information suggests about how to improve activities going forward?

Questions

For questions and additional resources, please contact the Language Policy and Leadership Office at (916) 319-0845.

English Proficiency and Academic Achievement
ESSA Section 3116(b)(2)(A-B)

Describe how the eligible entity will ensure that elementary schools and secondary schools receiving funds under Subpart 1 assist English learners in:

  • achieving English proficiency based on the State’s English language proficiency assessment under Section 1111(b)(2)(G), consistent with the State’s long-term goals, as described in Section 1111(c)(4)(A)(ii); and
  • meeting the challenging State academic standards.

Criteria

To meet this requirement, LEAs must provide a description of the following:

  • How the LEA ensures that elementary schools and secondary schools assist English learners in achieving English proficiency and meeting the challenging state academic standards.

 

Complete responses will:

  • Address how sites will be held accountable for meeting English acquisition progress for English learners.
  • Address how sites will be held accountable for meeting achievement goals for English learners.

Guidance

As an LEA reviews its processes for ensuring that all school sites assist English learners in achieving English proficiency and academic success to continuously improve Title III, Part A activities, it should consider:

  • Outreach to a diverse representation of stakeholders from across the LEA, especially those who work in high-needs schools and in early education, during the development of plans for Title III, Part A funds.
  • Informing stakeholders of past and current uses of Title III, Part A funds (specific to each site) and their effectiveness, as well as research or analysis of the new uses being proposed.
  • Genuinely considering concerns identified during stakeholder engagement activities and addressing those concerns with concrete explanations and plans.
  • What are reasonable expectations for success and how can success be measured?
  • What are interim progress and performance milestones that can be tracked?
  • Are the necessary data being collected and examined at the right frequency to monitor performance and make needed adjustments? Are the data high quality? Are specific populations and subgroups being considered such as long-term English learners, etc.?

Questions

For questions and additional resources, please contact the Language Policy and Leadership Office at (916) 319-0845.

Title IV, Part A

Title IV, Part A Activities and Programs
ESSA Section 4106(e)(1)

April 18, 2019 Clarification: All LEAs applying for Title IV, Part A must respond to the Title IV, Part A LCAP Federal Addendum Provision.

Note regarding transferability: As authorized in ESEA Section 5103 (b) An LEA may transfer all or part of the funds from Title IV Part A to Title I, Part A, C, or D, and to Title II, Part A or D, and to Title III Part A. If an LEA elects to transfer all or part of the funds to another Title, the LEA should indicate in their response that they will transfer the funds, and into which Title.

Describe the activities and programming that the LEA, or consortium of such agencies, will carry out under Subpart 1.

Criteria

To meet this requirement, LEAs, or consortium of such LEAs (LEAs) must provide a description of the following:

  • how the LEA developed its application in consultation with individuals and entities described in Section 4106(c)(1);
  • the needs assessment of the LEA as required by Section 4106(d) (Note: LEAs receiving a Student Support and Academic Achievement (SSAE) program allocation of less than $30,000 are exempt from this requirement);  
  • any partnership with an institution of higher education, business, nonprofit organization, community-based organization, or other public or private entity with a demonstrated record of success in implementing activities under this subpart;
  • if applicable, how funds will be used for activities related to supporting well-rounded education under Section 4107;
  • if applicable, how funds will be used for activities related to supporting safe and healthy students under Section 4108;
  • if applicable, how funds will be used for activities related to supporting the effective use of technology in schools under Section 4109; and
  • the program objectives and intended outcomes for activities under Subpart 1, and how the LEA, or consortium of such agencies, will periodically evaluate the effectiveness of the activities carried out under this section based on such objectives and outcomes.

Complete responses will:

  • Describe how an LEA or consortium of LEAs receiving an SSAE program allocation of at least $30,000 will use at least 20 percent of the SSAE program funds for activities authorized under Section 4107 that support student access to a well-rounded education and how the programs and activities carried out under this section are coordinated with other schools and community-based services. The LEA should indicate the amount of funds that the agency will designate for this purpose.
  • Describe how an LEA or consortium of LEAs that receives $30,000 or more in SSAE program funds will use at least 20 percent of those funds to develop, implement, and evaluate comprehensive programs and activities that:
    • Foster safe, healthy, supportive, and drug-free environments that support student academic achievement;
    • Are coordinated with other schools and community-based services and programs;
    • Promote the involvement of parents in the activity or program;
    • and, if applicable, how the programs are conducted in partnership with an IHE, business, nonprofit organization, community-based organization, or other public or private entity with a demonstrated record of success in implementing activities authorized under Section 4108.
    The LEA should indicate the amount of funds that the agency will designate for this purpose.
  • Describe how an LEA or consortium of LEAs that received $30,000 or more in SSAE program funds will use a portion use of the funds to improve the use of technology to improve academic achievement, academic growth and digital literacy of all students. LEAs may not spend more than 15 percent of funding in this section on purchasing devices, equipment, software applications, platforms, digital instructional resources and/or other one-time IT purchases.
  • The LEA should indicate the total amount of SSAE funds dedicated in total to support technology and how much, if any, is earmarked for purchasing devices, equipment, software applications, platforms, digital instructional resources and/or other one-time IT purchases.
  • Describe how an LEA or consortium of LEAs that receives less than $30,000 will use funds to support one or more of the three content areas; well-rounded education, safe and healthy students, or effective use of technology.

Guidance

Non-Regulatory Guidance issued by the U.S. Department of Education for the Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grants provided under subpart 1 of Title IV, Part A of the ESEA may be accessed on the USDE web site at https://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/essa/essassaegrantguid10212016.pdf External link opens in new window or tab. (PDF).

In this guidance document, the U.S. Department of Education (Department) provides key information on the provisions of the new SSAE program including a discussion of the allowable uses of funds, role of the CDE, fiscal responsibilities, and the local application requirements. In addition, the guidance provides examples of several innovative activities that demonstrate some of the SSAE program allowable uses of funds. It is important to note that SSAE funds may not be sufficient to independently fund many of these innovative activities. This guidance discusses leveraging other state and local resources in combination with the SSAE grant funds to achieve the goals of SSAE programs and activities. Finally, the Appendix provides resources, tools, and additional innovative strategies to support effective implementation of the SSAE program to improve outcomes for all students.

Resources

The following resources and tools are provided for the LEA’s reference. There are many examples that educators, parents, advocates, administrators, and other concerned parties may find helpful, and use at their discretion, with respect to implementing Title IV, Part A of the ESEA. The CDE does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of this outside information. Further, the inclusion of links to items and examples does not reflect their importance, nor are they intended to represent or be an endorsement by the CDE of any views expressed, or materials provided.

Well-Rounded Educational Opportunities
  • Advanced Placement and Dual Enrollment
    • A Comparison of the College Outcomes of AP and Dual Enrollment Students External link opens in new window or tab. - A report on the college outcomes of AP and dual enrollment students suggests that educators are increasingly focused on ensuring that students experience a rigorous curriculum in high school and graduate college and career ready. One way of introducing rigorous course work is to have students take college-level work, often in the form of either an AP course and exam or a dual enrollment course. The results indicated that AP students who obtained at least one score of 3 or higher on an AP Exam performed well on all examined outcomes of the study except for four-year college enrollment, which was highest for students who had taken a dual enrollment course affiliated with a four-year college.
  • Arts Education Research and Policy Clearinghouses
    • ArtsEdSearch External link opens in new window or tab. is an online clearinghouse of student and teacher outcomes associated with arts learning in and outside of school. Research studies are vetted for rigor and address a range of outcomes including academic, cognitive, personal, socio-emotional, and professional. The Arts Education Partnership External link opens in new window or tab., is the manager of ArtsEdSearch and is supported by the U.S. Department of Education and the National Endowment for the Arts through a cooperative agreement with the Education Commission of the States.
    • ArtsScan External link opens in new window or tab., also managed by the Arts Education Partnership, is a searchable database of State policies supporting education in and through the arts from all 50 States and the District of Columbia.
    • Preparing Students for the Next America External link opens in new window or tab. (PDF) is a short reseach bulletin outlining the research-based benefits of arts education on preparing students for success in school, work, and life.
  • Civic Education
    • The Role of Civic Education External link opens in new window or tab. provides a definition of “civic education,” suggests the essential components of a good civic education, and identifies where and when civic education occurs. The authors provide general recommendations for where and how civic education can be implemented in K-12 instruction.
  • Environmental Education
    • Guidelines for Excellence: K-12 Learning (2010) External link opens in new window or tab. - A guide published by the North American Association for Environmental Education, offers a vision of environmental education and promotes progress toward sustaining a healthy environment and quality of life. The guidelines provide learners, parents, educators, home schoolers, administrators, policy makers, and the public a set of common, voluntary guidelines for environmental education.
    • E-STEM Environmental K-12 Programs, in 2015, the UL company and the North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE) selected five STEM focused environmental, K-12 education projects to recognize with grants. The awards recognize efforts by the five non-profit entities to promote E-STEM learning through projects involving real environmental problems, with each demonstrating success and innovation in this field. Information on the award-winning E-STEM programs, both in school and after school, may be found at http://ulinnovationeducation.naaee.net/winners External link opens in new window or tab..
    • US Department of Education Green Ribbon Schools inspires schools, districts, and IHEs to strive for 21st-century excellence, by highlighting promising practices and resources that all can employ. To that end, the award recognizes schools, districts, and IHEs that: reduce environmental impact and costs; improve the health and wellness of schools, students, and staff; and provide environmental education, which teaches many disciplines, and are especially good at effectively incorporating STEM, civic skills, and green career pathways. Information on the Department of Education’s Green Ribbon Schools program and past awardees may be found at: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/green-ribbon-schools/awards.html External link opens in new window or tab..
  • Federal Arts Education Research Reports
  • Foreign Languages
  • Social and Emotional Learning
  • Social Studies
Safe and Healthy Students
  • Asthma Management in Schools
    • Environmental Protection Agency External link opens in new window or tab. - This guide offers valuable information for all school staff, especially school nurses, teachers and maintenance staff, on how to identify and control common environmental factors in schools that may trigger asthma episodes. Download the Managing Asthma in the School Environment document to learn how you can help control asthma at your school and boost student performance.
  • Bullying and Harassment Prevention
    • StopBullying.gov External link opens in new window or tab. provides information from various government agencies on what bullying is, what cyberbullying is, who is at risk, and how to prevent and respond to bullying.
  • Drug and Violence Prevention
    • Youth.gov External link opens in new window or tab. is a Federal website related to creating, maintaining, and strengthening effective youth programs. Included are facts, funding information, and tools to assess community assets, generate maps of local and Federal resources, and search for evidence-based youth programs.
  • Healthy Students
    • CDC Healthy Schools External link opens in new window or tab. is a Federal website with numerous resources to assist school districts and schools in creating healthy learning environments, including information related to nutrition, physical activity, obesity prevention, and the management of chronic conditions. There are also professional development and training materials for school personnel.
    • National Cancer Institute’s Research-tested Intervention Programs (RTIPs) External link opens in new window or tab. is a database that contains information on evidence-based cancer control interventions and program materials. Users may search for interventions that are implemented in school and focus on nutrition, obesity, or physical activity.
  • Human Trafficking
  • Indoor Air Quality (IAQ)
    • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) - EPA’s Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools Action Kit External link opens in new window or tab. guidance was designed to assist schools and districts with reducing exposure to indoor environmental contaminants in schools through voluntary adoption of sound and effective IAQ management practices. The Action Kit provides best practices, industry guidelines, sample policies and IAQ management plans for improving indoor air problems at little or no cost using straightforward activities and in-house staff. Additionally one can stay connected and learn about upcoming training opportunities Join the connector network at https://www.epa.gov/iaq-schools/forms/how-you-can-stay-connected-school-iaq-network External link opens in new window or tab.
  • Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports
    • Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) External link opens in new window or tab. was established by the U.S. Department of Education to define, develop, implement, and evaluate a multi-tiered approach to technical assistance that improves the capacity of States, districts, and schools to establish, scale-up, and sustain the PBIS framework. Emphasis is given to the impact of implementing PBIS on the social, emotional and academic outcomes for students with disabilities.
  • Re-entry Programs and Transition Services
    • Virginia’s Department of Justice External link opens in new window or tab. sponsors a program to provide regional Reentry Advocates to help create a seamless reentry process, connect youth to employment and vocational services and to link youth and families with services in the community. Reentry Advocates partner with local government agencies, local school districts and community stakeholders to connect youth and their families with benefits and resources, employability services and skills training and to connect them with positive adult role models.
  • Relationship-building Skills
Effective Use of Technology
  • Characteristics of Future Ready Leadership: A Research Synthesis External link opens in new window or tab. (PDF) may prove useful for strategic planning for superintendents, their leadership teams, and those supporting them in other contexts. It is aligned with the recommendations of the 2016 National Education Technology Plan, designed to ensure that as district leaders work to become Future Ready they will also be making progress toward implementing the broader technology vision for the nation. The research synthesis defines exemplary dimensions of policy and/or practice within four focus areas: collaborative leadership, robust infrastructure, personalized professional learning and personalized student learning.

  • Diagram Center Webinars External link opens in new window or tab. hosts a collection of free training, information sharing and what's going on in the field based on the overacrhing theme of accessibility and making educational materials accessible.

  • Ed Tech Developer's Guide External link opens in new window or tab. is a guide for developers, startups and entrepreneurs addressing key questions about the education ecosystem and highlights critical needs and opportunities to develop digital tools and apps for learning. This guide is designed to help entrepreneurs apply technology in smart ways to solve persistent problems in education.

  • Future Ready Interactive Planning Dashboard and Resource Hub External link opens in new window or tab. is a dashboard where district teams complete an in-depth self-assessment to determine their overall readiness to undergo a digital transformation, create a vision for student learning, and evaluate what aspects of the system they must address to make that vision a reality. After completing the self-assessment, each district team receives a customized report that analyzes the district’s readiness in each of the seven gears of the Future Ready Framework, identifies gaps, and offers customized strategies and free resources.

  • Future Ready Schools Infrastructure Guide External link opens in new window or tab. provides practical, actionable information intended to help district leaders (superintendents, principals, and teacher leaders) navigate the many decisions required to deliver cutting-edge connectivity and devices to students, and outlines principles and policies that support capacity building for educational technology and digital citizenship. It presents a variety of options for district leaders to consider when making technology infrastructure decisions, recognizing that circumstances and context vary greatly from district to district.

  • #GoOpen District Launch Packet External link opens in new window or tab. is designed for districts that have decided to implement a systematic approach to incorporating openly licensed education resources into their curriculum.

  • Learning Analytics External link opens in new window or tab. is intended to help policymakers and administrators understand how learning analytics has been—and can be—applied for educational improvement while rigorously protecting student privacy.
  • The National Education Technology Plan 2016 External link opens in new window or tab. is the flagship educational technology policy document for the United States. The 2016 Plan, Future Ready Learning: Reimagining the Role of Technology in Education, articulates a vision of equity, active use, and collaborative leadership to make everywhere, all-the-time learning possible. The principles and examples provided in the document align to the effective use of technology content area under Title IV, Part A.
Questions

For questions and additional resources, please contact Tom Herman, Education Administrator, School Health and Safety Office, at THerman@cde.ca.gov or by phone at (916) 319-0914.

 

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Questions:   Local Agency Systems Support Office | LCFF@cde.ca.gov
Last Reviewed: Thursday, April 18, 2019
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