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Title IV, Part A: SSAE

Title IV, Part A Student Support and Academic Enrichment (SSAE) program federal funds are to improve students’ academic achievement by increasing local educational agencies, schools, and local communities capacity.

The purpose of Title IV, Part A funds is to improve students’ academic achievement by increasing the capacity of states, local educational agencies (LEAs), schools, and local communities to:

  • Provide all students with access to a well-rounded education;
  • Improve school conditions for student learning; and
  • Improve the use of technology in order to improve the academic achievement and digital literacy of all students.

Eligibility

To qualify and be eligible for Title IV, Part A funds, LEAs must (1) submit an application including required LEA plan provisions to the State educational agency (SEA); and (2) complete a needs assessment (Every Student Succeeds Act [ESSA] Section 4106[a]). In California, the LEA plan is known as the Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP) Federal Addendum.

Local Educational Agency Plan Provisions

Each application submitted by a LEA, or a consortium of such agencies, shall include the following: A description of the activities and programming that the LEA, or consortium of such agencies, will carry out under Title IV, Part A, including a description of:

  1. any partnership with an institution of higher education, business, nonprofit organization, community-based organization, or other public or private entity with a demonstrated record of success in implementing activities under Title IV, Part A;
  2. if applicable, how funds will be used for activities related to supporting well-rounded education;
  3. if applicable, how funds will be used for activities related to supporting safe and healthy students;
  4. if applicable, how funds will be used for activities related to supporting the effective use of technology in schools; and
  5. the program objectives and intended outcomes for activities under Title IV, Part A, and how the LEA, or consortium of such agencies, will periodically evaluate the effectiveness of the activities carried out under Title IV, Part A, based on such objectives and outcomes.

Each application shall include assurances that the LEA, or consortium of such agencies, will prioritize the distribution of funds to schools served by the LEA, or consortium of such agencies, that—

  1. are among the schools with the greatest needs, as determined by such LEA, or consortium;
  2. have the highest percentages or numbers of children counted;
  3. are identified for comprehensive support and improvement;
  4. are implementing targeted support and improvement plans; or
  5. are identified as a persistently dangerous public elementary school or secondary school;

Additionally, assurance shall:

  • comply with Section 8501 (regarding equitable participation by private school children and teachers);
  • use not less than 20 percent of Title IV, Part A funds received to support one or more of the activities;
  • use not less than 20 percent of Title IV, Part A funds received to support one or more activities;
  • use a portion of Title IV, Part A funds received to support one or more activities, including an assurance that the LEA, or consortium of LEAs, will comply with ESSA Section 4109(b); and
  • annually report to the State for inclusion in the report described how Title IV, Part A funds are being used to meet the requirements above.

Any LEA receiving an LEA allocation under ESSA Section 4105(a)(1) in an amount less than $30,000 shall be required to provide only one of the assurances described above.

Template for LEA Plan Provisions

Information on submitting an LEA’s plan provisions for SEA approval, via the LCAP Federal Addendum, please visit the Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP) web page.

Consultation

According to ESSA Section 4106(c) a LEA, or consortium of such agencies, shall develop its application through consultation with parents, teachers, principals, other school leaders, specialized instructional support personnel, students, community-based organizations, local government representatives (which may include a local law enforcement agency, local juvenile court, local child welfare agency, or local public housing agency), Indian tribes or tribal organizations that may be located in the region served by the LEA (where applicable), charter school teachers, principals, and other school leaders (if such agency or consortium of such agencies supports charter schools), and others with relevant and demonstrated expertise in programs and activities designed to meet the purpose of Title IV, Part A.

The LEA, or consortium of such agencies, shall engage in continued consultation as stated above in order to improve the local activities in order to meet the purpose of Title IV, Part A and to coordinate such implementation with other related strategies, programs, and activities being conducted in the community.

Needs Assessment

According to the Every Student Succeeds Act Section 4106(d), prior to receiving an allocation under Title IV, Part A, a local educational agency (LEA) or consortium of such agencies shall conduct a comprehensive needs assessment of the LEA or agencies proposed to be served under Title IV, Part A, in order to examine needs for improvement of—

  1. access to, and opportunities for, a well-rounded education for all students;
  2. school conditions for student learning in order to create a healthy and safe school environment; and
  3. access to personalized learning experiences supported by technology and professional development for the effective use of data and technology.

Each LEA, or consortium of LEAs, shall conduct the needs assessment once every 3 years.

A LEA receiving a Title IV, Part A LEA allocation in an amount that is less than $30,000 shall not be required to conduct a comprehensive needs assessment.

Template for Title IV, Part A Needs Assessment

To assist LEAs with the Title IV, Part A needs assessment, the following template is provided:

Title IV, Part A Needs Assessment (DOCX)

Activities

Well-Rounded Education Activities

Each local educational agency (LEA), or consortium of such agencies, that receives a Title IV, Part A allocation pursuant to the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Section 4107 shall use a portion of such funds to develop and implement programs and activities that support access to a well-rounded education and that—

  1. are coordinated with other schools and community based services and programs;
  2. may be conducted in partnership with an institution of higher education, business, nonprofit organization, community based organization, or other public or private entity with a demonstrated record of success in implementing activities; and
  3. may include programs and activities, such as—
    1. college and career guidance and counseling programs, such as—
      1. postsecondary education and career awareness and exploration activities; information in assisting students with postsecondary education and career planning; and
      2. financial literacy and Federal financial aid awareness activities;
    2. programs and activities that use music and the arts as tools to support student success through the promotion of constructive student engagement, problem solving, and conflict resolution;
    3. programming and activities to improve instruction and student engagement in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, including computer science, (referred to in this section as ‘‘STEM subjects’’) such as—
      1. increasing access for students through grade 12 who are members of groups underrepresented in such subject fields, such as female students, minority students, English learners, children with disabilities, and economically disadvantaged students, to high-quality courses;
      2. supporting the participation of low-income students in nonprofit competitions related to STEM subjects (such as robotics, science research, invention, mathematics, computer science, and technology competitions);
      3. providing hands-on learning and exposure to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics and supporting the use of field-based or service learning to enhance the students’ understanding of the STEM subjects;
      4. supporting the creation and enhancement of STEM-focused specialty schools;
      5. facilitating collaboration among school, afterschool program, and informal program personnel to improve the integration of programming and instruction in the identified subjects; and
      6. integrating other academic subjects, including the arts, into STEM subject programs to increase participation in STEM subjects, improve attainment of skills related to STEM subjects, and promote well-rounded education;
    4. efforts to raise student academic achievement through accelerated learning programs, such as—
      1. reimbursing low-income students to cover part or all of the costs of accelerated learning examination fees, if the low-income students are enrolled in accelerated learning courses and plan to take accelerated learning examinations; or
      2. increasing the availability of, and enrollment in, accelerated learning courses, accelerated learning examinations, dual or concurrent enrollment programs, and early college high school courses;
    5. activities to promote the development, implementation, and strengthening of programs to teach traditional government education;
    6. foreign language instruction;
    7. environmental education;
    8. programs and activities that promote volunteerism and community involvement;
    9. programs and activities that support educational programs that integrate multiple disciplines, such as programs that combine arts and mathematics; or
    10. other activities and programs to support student access to, and success in, a variety of well-rounded education experiences.

Safe and Healthy Student Activities

Each LEA, or consortium of such agencies, that receives a Title IV, Part A allocation pursuant to ESSA Section 4108 shall use a portion of such funds to develop, implement, and evaluate comprehensive programs and activities that—

  1. are coordinated with other schools and community based services and programs;
  2. foster safe, healthy, supportive, and drug-free environments that support student academic achievement;
  3. promote the involvement of parents in the activity or program;
  4. may be conducted in partnership with an institution of higher education, business, nonprofit organization, community based organization, or other public or private entity with a demonstrated record of success in implementing activities described in this section; and
  5. may include, among other programs and activities—
    1. drug and violence prevention activities and programs that are evidence-based (to the extent the State, in consultation with LEAs in the state, determines that such evidence is reasonably available) including—
      1. programs to educate students against the use of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, smokeless tobacco products, and electronic cigarettes; and
      2. professional development and training for school and specialized instructional support personnel and interested community members in prevention, education, early identification, intervention mentoring, recovery support services and, where appropriate, rehabilitation referral, as related to drug and violence prevention;
    2. in accordance with ESSA Section 4001 (General Provisions) and ESSA Section 4111 (Rule of Construction)—
      1. school-based mental health services, including early identification of mental health symptoms, drug use, and violence, and appropriate referrals to direct individual or group counseling services, which may be provided by school-based mental health services providers; and
      2. school-based mental health services partnership programs that—
        1. are conducted in partnership with a public or private mental health entity or health care entity; and
        2. provide comprehensive school-based mental health services and supports and staff development for school and community personnel working in the school that are—
          1. based on trauma-informed practices that are evidence-based (to the extent the State, in consultation with LEAs in the state, determines that such evidence is reasonably available);
          2. coordinated (where appropriate) with early intervening services provided under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.); and
          3. provided by qualified mental and behavioral health professionals who are certified or licensed by the State involved and practicing within their area of expertise;
    3. programs or activities that—
      1. integrate health and safety practices into school or athletic programs;
      2. support a healthy, active lifestyle, including nutritional education and regular, structured physical education activities and programs, that may address chronic disease management with instruction led by school nurses, nurse practitioners, or other appropriate specialists or professionals to help maintain the well-being of students;
      3. help prevent bullying and harassment;
      4. improve instructional practices for developing relationship-building skills, such as effective communication, and improve safety through the recognition and prevention of coercion, violence, or abuse, including teen and dating violence, stalking, domestic abuse, and sexual violence and harassment;
      5. provide mentoring and school counseling to all students, including children who are at risk of academic failure, dropping out of school, involvement in criminal or delinquent activities, or drug use and abuse;
      6. establish or improve school dropout and reentry programs; or
      7. establish learning environments and enhance students’ effective learning skills that are essential for school readiness and academic success, such as by providing integrated systems of student and family supports;
    4. high-quality training for school personnel, including specialized instructional support personnel, related to—
      1. suicide prevention;
      2. effective and trauma-informed practices in classroom management;
      3. crisis management and conflict resolution techniques;
      4. human trafficking (defined as an act or practice described in paragraph [9] or [10] of Section 103 of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 [22 U.S.C. 7102]);
      5. school-based violence prevention strategies;
      6. drug abuse prevention, including educating children facing substance abuse at home; and
      7. bullying and harassment prevention;
    5. in accordance with ESSA Section 4001 (General Provisions) and ESSA Section 4111 (Rule of Construction), child sexual abuse awareness and prevention programs or activities, such as programs or activities designed to provide—
      1. age-appropriate and developmentally-appropriate instruction for students in child sexual abuse awareness and prevention, including how to recognize child sexual abuse and how to safely report child sexual abuse; and
      2. information to parents and guardians of students about child sexual abuse awareness and prevention, including how to recognize child sexual abuse and how to discuss child sexual abuse with a child;
    6. designing and implementing a locally-tailored plan to reduce exclusionary discipline practices in elementary and secondary schools that—
      1. is consistent with best practices;
      2. includes strategies that are evidence-based (to the extent the State, in consultation with LEAs in the state, determines that such evidence is reasonably available); and
      3. is aligned with the long-term goal of prison reduction through opportunities, mentoring, intervention, support, and other education services, referred to as a ‘‘youth PROMISE plan’’; or
    7. implementation of schoolwide positive behavioral interventions and supports, including through coordination with similar activities carried out under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.), in order to improve academic outcomes and school conditions for student learning;
    8. designating a site resource coordinator at a school or LEA to provide a variety of services, such as—
      1. establishing partnerships within the community to provide resources and support for schools;
      2. ensuring that all service and community partners are aligned with the academic expectations of a community school in order to improve student success; and
      3. strengthening relationships between schools and communities; or
        1. pay for success initiatives aligned with the purposes of this section.

Effective Use of Technology Activities

Each LEA, or consortium of such agencies, that receives a Title IV, Part A allocation pursuant to ESSA Section 4109 shall use a portion of such funds to improve the use of technology to improve the academic achievement, academic growth, and digital literacy of all students, including by meeting the needs of such agency or consortium that are identified in the needs assessment conducted (if applicable), which may include—

  1. providing educators, school leaders, and administrators with the professional learning tools, devices, content, and resources to—
    1. personalize learning to improve student academic achievement;
    2. discover, adapt, and share relevant high-quality educational resources;
    3. use technology effectively in the classroom, including by administering computer-based assessments and blended learning strategies; and
    4. implement and support school and district-wide approaches for using technology to inform instruction, support teacher collaboration, and personalize learning;
  2. building technological capacity and infrastructure, which may include—
    1. procuring content and ensuring content quality; and
    2. purchasing devices, equipment, and software applications in order to address readiness shortfalls;
  3. developing or using effective or innovative strategies for the delivery of specialized or rigorous academic courses and curricula through the use of technology, including digital learning technologies and assistive technology;
  4. carrying out blended learning projects, which shall include—
    1. planning activities, which may include development of new instructional models (including blended learning technology software and platforms), the purchase of digital instructional resources, initial professional development activities, and one-time information technology purchases, except that such expenditures may not include expenditures related to significant construction or renovation of facilities; or
    2. ongoing professional development for teachers, principals, other school leaders, or other personnel involved in the project that is designed to support the implementation and academic success of the project;
  5. providing professional development in the use of technology (which may be provided through partnerships with outside organizations) to enable teachers and instructional leaders to increase student achievement in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, including computer science; and
  6. providing students in rural, remote, and underserved areas with the resources to take advantage of high-quality digital learning experiences, digital resources, and access to online courses taught by effective educators.

An LEA, or consortium of such agencies, shall not use more than 15 percent of funds for purchasing technology infrastructure, which shall include technology infrastructure purchased for the activities pursuant to ESSA Section 4109(a)(4)(A).

Internet Safety

According to ESSA Section 4121(1)(A), an LEA must have in place a policy of Internet safety for minors that includes the operation of a technology protection measure with respect to any of its computers with Internet access that protects against access through such computers to visual depictions that are obscene and harmful to minors and is enforcing the operation of this policy. For additional information about Title IV, Part A, Subpart 2 - Internet Safety, please visit the Internet Safety web page.

Equitable Services

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Section 8501(a)(4), requires that expenditures for educational services and other benefits for eligible nonprofit private school children, their teachers, and other educational personnel serving those children, under Title IV, Part A, be equal to expenditures for the public school program, taking into account the number and educational needs of the children to be served.

The amount a local educational agency (LEA) must reserve for Title IV, Part A equitable services to children, their teachers, and other educational personnel in participating nonprofit private schools is based on the total enrollment of nonprofit private and public school students.

Example of Formula to Determine Amount for Title IV, Part A Equitable Services Expenditures
A. Number of Students
Number of Students Enrollment
A1: LEA Enrollment
900
A2: Participating Nonprofit Private School Enrollment
100
A3: Total Enrollment (A1 + A2)
1,000
B. Title IV, Part A Allocation
Title IV, Part A Allocation Amount
B1: Total LEA Allocation
$10,000

B2: 2% Administration Costs
(for public and nonprofit private school programs)

$200
B3: Indirect Costs (varies by LEA)
$1,000

B4: LEA Allocation minus Admin Costs (B1 – B2 – B3)

$8,800
C. Per Pupil Rate
Per Pupil Rate Amount
C1: Available Per Pupil Allocation for Equitable Services (B4 ÷ A3)
$8.80
D. Equitable Services
Equitable Services Amount

Amount LEA must reserve for equitable services for nonprofit private school children, their teachers, and other educational personnel (A2 x C1)

$880

For additional information about equitable services, please visit the Equitable Services Ombudsman web page.

Funding

LEA Allocation

According to the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Section 4105(a), eligible local educational agencies (LEAs) may receive an LEA allocation amount that bears the same relationship to the total amount of such reservation as the amount the LEA received under Title I, Part A Subpart 2 for the preceding fiscal year bears to the total amount received by all LEAs in the State for the preceding fiscal year. No Title IV, Part A LEA allocation may be made in an amount that is less than $10,000. LEAs in a State may form a consortium with other surrounding LEAs and combine the funds each such agency in the consortium receives under this section to jointly carry out the local activities.

Once LEAs have an approved Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP) Federal Addendum, eligible LEAs may apply for funds on the Consolidated Application and Reporting System (CARS) Application for Funding form during the Spring Release. For additional information on CARS, please visit the Consolidated Application (ConApp) web page.

Title IV, Part A LEA Allocations

To locate the Title IV, Part A LEA Allocations and funding profile, please visit the Title IV, Part A LEA Allocations web page.

For questions regarding Title IV, Part A funding and allocations, contact the Categorical Allocation and Audit Resolution Office, by email at CAAR@cde.ca.gov.

Carryover and Closeout

According to the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) pursuant to 34 CFR 76.709[b], it is the expectation that Title IV, Part A LEA allocations be obligated and expended during the fiscal year in which received.

For additional information regarding Title IV, Part A carryover and closeout funds, please visit the Title IV, Part A Carryover and Closeout web page.

Use of Funds

According to ESSA Section 4106[e][2], each LEA shall assure:

  1. prioritize the distribution of funds to schools served by the LEA, or consortium of such agencies, that—
    1. are among the schools with the greatest needs, as determined by such LEA, or consortium;
    2. have the highest percentages or numbers of children counted;
    3. are identified for comprehensive support and improvement;
    4. are implementing targeted support and improvement plans; or
    5. are identified as a persistently dangerous public elementary school or secondary school;
  2. comply with equitable services requirements pursuant to ESSA Section 8501;
  3. use not less than 20 percent of Title IV, Part A funds to support one or more well-rounded education activities;
  4. use not less than 20 percent of Title IV, Part A funds to support one or more safe and healthy student activities;
  5. use a portion of Title IV, Part A funds to support one or more effective use of technology activities;
  6. annually report to the State how funds are being used. In California, LEAs shall submit the CARS Title IV, Part A Use of Funds report during the Winter Release to report how funds are being used.

According to ESSA Section 4106(f), any LEA receiving a Title IV, Part A LEA allocation in an amount less than $30,000 shall be required to provide only one of the assurances described in subparagraphs (C), (D), and (E) as seen above.

Below, you will find the use of funds requirements based on LEA allocation:

LEA Allocation $30,000 or more LEA Allocation Less than $30,000

Based on the needs assessment, the following must be applied:

  • Use not less than 20 percent of funds to support one or more well-rounded education activities;
  • Use not less than 20 percent of funds to support one or more safe and healthy students activities;
  • Use a portion of funds to support one or more effective use of technology activities.

Based on the local needs, one or more of the following must be applied:

  • Use not less than 20 percent of funds to support one or more well-rounded education activities;
  • Use not less than 20 percent of funds to support one or more safe and healthy students activities; and/or
  • Use a portion of funds to support one or more effective use of technology activities.


The California Department of Education recommends the LEAs to consider general criteria when approving activities or expenditures supported with Title IV, Part A funds. To locate information on Title IV, Part A authorized use of funds, please visit the Title IV, Part A Authorized Use of Funds web page.

Capital Expenditures

Property with a useful life of more than one year and an acquisition cost that equals or exceeds the federal per-unit capitalization threshold of $5,000, or a lower threshold set by state or local-level regulations. To locate information on Title IV, Part A capital expenditures, inventory or disposals of capital expenditures, please visit the Title IV, Part A Capital Expenditures web page.

Prohibited Use of Funds

According to ESSA Section 4001(b), no Title IV, Part A funds may be used for medical services or drug treatment or rehabilitation, except for integrated student supports, specialized instructional support services, or referral to treatment for impacted students, which may include students who are victims of, or witnesses to, crime or who illegally use drugs.

Compliance

Federal Program Monitoring

The California Department of Education (CDE) is responsible for conducting compliance monitoring for local educational agencies (LEAs) receiving Title IV, Part A funds, also named as the Student Support and Academic Enrichment (SSAE) program. Through the federal program monitoring (FPM) process, the CDE annually monitors a select number of LEAs for compliance with federal statutes regarding the Title IV, Part A program.

Information on compliance monitoring, monitoring tools, selection criteria, training, and other resources can be found on the Compliance Monitoring web page.

SEA Reporting Requirements

As a condition of federal funds, State Educational Agencies (SEAs) and LEAs assure to specific data and evaluations reporting requirements. According to the Every Student Succeeds Act Section (ESSA) Section 4104(a)(2), each State that receives Title IV, Part A grant funds for a fiscal year shall publicly report on how Title IV, Part A funds are being expended by LEAs, including the degree to which the LEAs have made progress toward meeting the objectives and outcomes.

Below, you will find the Title IV, Part A LEA use of funds data in accordance with fiscal year:

2019-20 Title IV, Part A Use of Funds Report (XLSX)

LEA Reporting Requirements

Codified in ESSA Section 9303, LEAs that receive Title IV, Part A grant funds are subject to annual reporting requirements that collect information related to the activities and outcomes of the programs. All Title IV, Part A LEA reporting data is collected through the Consolidated Application Reporting System (CARS) during the Winter Release in order to collect end of year data.

In CARS, LEAs report how Title IV, Part A funds are used, the progress made toward meeting objectives and outcomes (ESSA Section 4104[a][2]), consultation and equitable services participation, unspent and expired funds, and if any Title IV, Part A funds have been federally transferred pursuant to ESSA Section 5102.

For more information about Title IV, Part A CARS forms and instructions, please visit the CDE’s Consolidated Application and Reporting System web page.

Resources

COVID-19 Resources

FY 2018–19 Title IV, Part A Funds

On April 21, 2020, the U.S. Department of Education (ED) granted the State of California approval of their Federal Funding Flexibility Waiver. For additional information regarding the approved Title IV, Part A Federal Funding Flexibility Waiver, please visit the CDE COVID-19 Federal Funding Flexibility web page.

  • Section 421(b) of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA) to extend the period of availability of FY 2018 funds for programs in which your SEA participates under its approved consolidated State plan until September 30, 2022.
  • Section 4106(e)(2)(C), (D), and (E) of Title IV, Part A of the ESSA with respect to content-area spending requirements for FY 2018-19 Title IV, Part A funds.
  • Section 4109(b) of Title IV, Part A of the ESSA with respect to the spending limitation for technology infrastructure for FY 2018-19 Title IV, Part A funds.
FY 2019–20 Title IV, Part A Funds

On April 21, 2020, the U.S. Department of Education (ED) granted the State of California approval of their Federal Funding Flexibility Waiver. For additional information regarding the approved Title IV, Part A Federal Funding Flexibility Waiver, please visit the CDE COVID-19 Federal Funding Flexibility web page.

  • Section 421(b) of the GEPA to extend the period of availability of FY 2019 funds for programs in which your SEA participates under its approved consolidated State plan until September 30, 2022.
  • Section 4106(d) of Title IV, Part A of the ESSA related to local educational agency (LEA) needs assessments for the 2019-2020 school year.
  • Section 4106(e)(2)(C), (D), and (E) of Title IV, Part A of the ESSA with respect to content-area spending requirements for FY 2019 Title IV, Part A funds.
  • Section 4109(b) of Title IV, Part A of the ESSA with respect to the spending limitation for technology infrastructure for FY 2019 Title IV, Part A funds.
FY 2020-21 Title IV, Part A Funds

On April 19, 2021, the U.S. Department of Education (ED) granted the State of California approval of their Federal Funding Flexibility Waiver. For additional information regarding the approved Title IV, Part A Federal Funding Flexibility Waiver, please visit the CDE COVID-19 Federal Funding Flexibility web page.

  • Section 4106(d) of Title IV, Part A of the ESEA, related to LEA needs assessments for the 2020-2021 school year.
  • Section 4106(e)(2)(C), (D), and (E) of Title IV, Part A of the ESEA, with respect to content-area spending requirements for FY 2020 Title IV, Part A funds.
  • Section 4109(b) of Title IV, Part A of the ESEA, with respect to the fifteen percent spending limitation for technology infrastructure for FY 2020 Title IV, Part A funds.

Resources

U.S Department of Education Resources

Questions: Kevin Donnelly | TitleIV@cde.ca.gov | 916-319-0942 
Last Reviewed: Thursday, September 16, 2021
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