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Chapter Six Long Descriptions

Long descriptions for complex figures in chapter six of the California Practitioners’ Guide for Educating English Learners with Disabilities.

Figure 6.7

Figure 6.7 is a screenshot of a sample completed form called “Collaborative Conversations Observation Notes.” This figure shows observation notes for a collaborative conversation for a grade seven student and comes from chapter 8 of the English Language Arts/English Language Development (ELA/ELD) Framework.

The first line of the form has the title “Collaborative Conversations Observation Notes.”

The second line has a box on the left with the title English Language Development Level Continuum below which the progression from “Emerging to Expanding to Bridging” is shown. The column to the right of the progression is titled “Student said… (note students’ comments and names).”

The line below contains the title “CA ELD Standards in Focus,” and the following line states “Exchanging Ideas Respectfully (ELD.PI.7.1.).”

The row below has three columns, from left to right, with sample responses. The first column aligned to the left margin contains sample observations with examples of emerging development and states: “Engage in conversational exchanges and express ideas about familiar topics by asking and answering yes-no and why questions and responding using simple phrases.” The column to the right contains examples of expanding development and states: “Contribute to class, group, and partner discussions by following turn-taking rules, asking relevant questions, affirming others, adding relevant information, and paraphrasing key ideas.” The next column to the right contains examples of bridging development and states: “Contribute to class, group, and partner discussions by following turn-taking rules, asking relevant questions, affirming others, adding relevant information and evidence, paraphrasing key ideas, building on responses, and providing useful feedback.”

The line below lists a new standard named “Supporting Opinions and Persuading Others (ELD.PI.7.3.).”

The row below has three columns, from left to right with sample responses. The first column aligned to the left margin contains sample observations with examples of emerging development and states: “Negotiate with or persuade others in conversations (e.g., to gain and hold the floors or ask for clarification) using learned phrases (e.g., I think . . ., Would you please repeat that) and open responses.”

The column to the right contains examples of expanding development and states: “Negotiate with or persuade others in conversations (e.g., to provide counter-arguments) using learned phrases (I agree with X, but . . . .), and open responses.”

The next column to the right contains examples of bridging development and states: Negotiate with or persuade other in conversations using appropriate register (e.g., to acknowledge new information) using a variety of learned phrases, indirect reported speech (e.g., I heard you say X, and I have not thought about that before), and open responses.”

The line below includes space for documenting a “Quick Observation Analysis.” Below this box is a box for documenting “Next steps to take.”

The source for figure 6.7 is: California Department of Education, English Language Arts/English Language Development Framework for California Public Schools (Sacramento, CA: California Department of Education, 2015).

Return to the California Practitioners' Guide for Educating English Learners with Disabilities (PDF; 6MB)

 

Figure 6.10

Figure 6.10 is a graphic titled “ELA/ELD Framework Circles of Implementation” and is found on page 23 of the English Language Arts/English Language Development (ELA/ELD) Framework. The graphic represents how teachers in California can successfully implement the standards.

The graphic shows a series of concentric and interconnected circles and is a visual representation of how the ELA/ELD standards for teaching and learning should occur. The outer ring of the graphic represents the common goals of the California ELA/ELD framework to ensure that all of California’s students graduate from high school and achieve Readiness for College, Careers, and Civic Life; Capacities of Literate Individuals; Broadly Literate; and 21st Century. The next ring in has a white field that identifies the context features for learning with the words Motivating, Engaging, Respectful, Intellectually Challenging, and Integrated.

At the center and core of the figure are the California Common Core State Standards (CA CCSS) for engaging English Language Arts/Literacy and the key themes they embody: Meaning Making, Language Development, Effective Expression, Content Knowledge, and Foundational Skills. Within that core, the CA ELD Standards provide guidance on supporting English learners to access and achieve reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language in all disciplines.

Return to the California Practitioners' Guide for Educating English Learners with Disabilities (PDF; 6MB)

 

Figure 6.15

English Learner Roadmap Rubric for Self-Reflection

Figure 6.15 is a screenshot of CDE’s “English Learner Roadmap Rubric for Self-Reflection,” which is designed to assist school and district teams with engaging in dialogue to assess current status in enacting the English Learner Roadmap principles and to identify areas needing improvement.

At the top of the page is the title “English Learner Roadmap Rubric,” and under the title is the description of the tool: “School and district teams can use this self-reflection rubric to engage in dialogue, to assess current status in enacting the Roadmap Principles and identify areas needing improvement.”

The line of text underneath reads “Principle #1: Assets-oriented and needs-responsive schools.” The description of the principle follows and reads “Pre-schools and schools are responsive to different EL strengths, needs and identities, and support the socio-emotional health and development of English learners. Programs value and build upon the cultural and linguistic assets students bring to their education in safe and affirming school climates. Educators value and build strong family, community, and school partnerships.”

The next section contains the self-reflection rubric in a table format. The column headers from left to right read: “Element; 1 Minimal or not at all; 2 Somewhat Responsive; 3 Responsive; and 4 Very Responsive.”

Below the headers are the rubric items. The first row in the “Element” column contains the following element: “A. The languages and cultures ELs bring to their education are assets for their own learning, and are important contributions to our learning communities. These assets are valued and built upon in culturally responsive curriculum and instruction and in programs that support, wherever possible, the development of proficiency in multiple languages.”

Under the “1 Minimal or not at all” column is the description of the rating for this element, which reads: “Little to no mention or visibility of language diversity or cultural diversity. No programs or instructional support for developing bilingualism.”

Under the “2 Somewhat Responsive” column is the description of the rating for this element, which reads: Some affirmation of language and cultural diversity as a general concept (e.g., mission statements); some teachers may include culturally responsive approaches in teaching.

Under the “3 Responsive” column includes the description of the rating for this element which reads: “School has some programs and aspects of culturally/linguistically responsive instruction in place. Multilingual programs are available for some students only.”

Under the “4 Very Responsive column” is the description of the rating for this element, which reads: “School is multi-lingual focused, and dedicated to culturally responsive pedagogy and climate for all students. School has programs, materials, celebrations engaging students in many opportunities to build proficiency in multiple languages.”

The next in row in the Element column contains the following element: “B. Recognizing that there is no single EL profile and no one-size approach that works for all, programs, curriculum and instruction are responsive to different EL student characteristics and experiences.”

Under the “1 Minimal or not at all column” is the description of the rating for this element, which reads: “Programs, curriculum, and instruction are the same for all students.”

Under the “2 Somewhat Responsive” column is the description of the rating for this element, which reads: “Programs, curriculum, and instruction are somewhat adaptive to suit the students.”

Under the “3 Responsive column” is the description of the rating for this element which reads: “Programs, curriculum, and instruction are fairly adaptive to the individual student.”

Under the “4 Very Responsive” column is the description of the rating for this element, which reads: “Programs, curriculum, and instruction are tailored toward each individual student in order to promote the greatest amount of learning for each individual.”

The next row in the “Element” column contains the following element: “C. School climates and campuses are affirming, inclusive and safe.”

Under the “1 Minimal or not at all” column is the description of the rating for this element, which reads: “School climate is questionable, and/or unwelcoming towards certain minorities.”

Under the “2 Somewhat Responsive” column is the description of the rating for this element, which reads: “School climate feels fairly safe, and fairly affirming towards most students and their families.”

Under the “3 Responsive” column is the description of the rating for this element, which reads: “School climate feels safe, and affirming towards most students and their families.”

Under the “4 Very Responsive” column is the description of the rating for this element, which reads: “School climate feels safe and affirming. Policies support inclusivity. Students and their families are treated fairly.”

The next row in the “Element” column contains the following element: “D. Schools value and build strong family and school partnerships.”

Under the “1 Minimal or not at all” column is the description of the rating for this element, which reads: “Parents are rarely included or rarely present in school activities.”

Under “2 Somewhat Responsive” column is the description of the rating for this element, which reads: “Parents are somewhat involved and engaged in their children’s learning experience.”

Under the “3 Responsive” column is the description of the rating for this element, which reads: “Parents are fairly involved and engaged in their children’s learning experience.”

Under the “4 Very Responsive” column is the description of the rating for this element which reads: “Parents are very involved and engaged in their children’s learning experience. School has proactive supports for two-way engagement with families.”

The source for figure 6.15, Sample Tool #1, is The English Learner Roadmap Rubric for Self-Reflection External link opens in new window or tab. (PDF)

Return to the California Practitioners' Guide for Educating English Learners with Disabilities (PDF; 6MB)

 

Figure 6.16

Figure 6.16 is titled “California LRE Self-Assessment and Continuous Improvement Activities—District Level.” It is a screen shot of a sample tool that can be used by districts to examine their access to the least restrictive environment (LRE) for their students with IEPs.

The top of the form provides the title “California LRE Self-Assessment and Continuous Improvement Activities—District Level.” Under the title, in table format, the first row provides headers for the four table columns reading from left to right: “Components and Features of LRE (1); Rating (2); Information to Support Rating (3); Improvement Activities (4).”

The row under the “Components and Features of LRE” column header is the first component which reads: “1. Vision, expectations, leadership and climate.” A bulleted list follows:

“1.1 The district has a vision that values and celebrates student diversity.

  • There is evidence of guiding principles which encourage and support:
  • All students educated together.
  • High standards and expectations for all students.
  • Access to general education curriculum for all students.
  • Participation of all students in district and state assessments with or without accommodations or through an alternate assessment as determined appropriate by the IEP team.
  • Input from diverse groups of educators, parents, and the community.
  • District staff communicates and demonstrates a philosophy that all students’ abilities vs. disabilities are emphasized.”

The next column, the “Rating” column, provides a blank space for the team to add its rating of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

The next column to the right, “Information to Support Rating”, provides a blank space for the team to note its information.

The next column to the right, “Improvement Activities”, provides a blank space for the team to note improvement activities discussed.

The next row under the “Components and Features of LRE” column header is the second component, which reads: “1.2 Leadership is supportive of the LRE, and district initiatives and activities reflect the LRE.” A bulleted list follows:

  • District staff are committed to the implementation of LRE programs and supports for students.
  • The district special education office monitors implementation of LRE throughout the district on an ongoing basis, including access to the general education curriculum and access to extra-curricular activities for all school-age students, and developmentally-appropriate activities for preschool children.
  • Personnel within the district and schools are held accountable for implementing LRE.
  • District staff directs resources to the training of district and school staff regarding LRE requirements and appropriate opportunities and assessments.

The next column to the right, the “Rating” column, provides a blank space for the team to add its rating of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

The next column to the right, the “Information to Support Rating” column, provides a blank space for the team to note its information. The next column to the right, the “Improvement Activities” column, provides a blank space for the team to note improvement activities discussed.

The source for figure 6.16, Sample Tool #2 is: The California LRE Self-Assessment and Continuous Improvement Activities—District Level External link opens in new window or tab. (PDF)

Return to the California Practitioners' Guide for Educating English Learners with Disabilities (PDF; 6MB)

 

Questions: Patrick Garcia-Smith | PGarciaSmith@cde.ca.gov | 916-322-5101 
Last Reviewed: Tuesday, December 22, 2020
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