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Frequently Asked Questions - Form J-13A

FAQs about the submittal and approval process of Form J-13A.

General Submittal Information | School Closure | Material Decrease | Affidavit | Reporting Approvals

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General Submittal Information
  1. Who may submit a Form J-13A?

    Only local educational agencies that report Principal Apportionment average daily attendance for the purpose of calculating a K–12 Local Control Funding Formula entitlement should submit a Form J-13A (adult education, regional occupational centers and programs, after school programs, and early education should not use the Form J-13A).

  2. When an emergency occurs, does a Form J-13A need to be submitted immediately to the California Department of Education?

    No, a Form J-13A should be submitted as soon as possible once the emergency is over. This way the local educational agency can determine the exact number of school closure days and/or material decrease in attendance for the request.

  3. Is there a deadline for submitting a Form J-13A?

    No. There is no specific deadline for submitting a Form J-13A. There are audit implications to filing Form J-13A closure requests for programs without a fixed divisor after the fiscal year in which the closure occurred is audited. There are funding implications to filing Form J-13A closure requests for programs with a fixed divisor and for all material decrease requests after the P-2 and Annual reporting periods in the fiscal year in which the closure or material decrease occurred. For more specific information regarding the implications of the timing of a local educational agency’s Form J-13A request, contact the California Department of Education via email at attendanceaccounting@cde.ca.gov.

  4. Does a charter school need to file a separate Form J-13A?

    Yes. A charter school must file separately from the authorizing school district or county office of education and must have the Form J-13A signed off by the charter school authorizer. Each charter school that has its own county-district-school (CDS) code and charter number will need to submit a separate Form J-13A.

  5. What constitutes a complete submittal?

    All pages of the Form J-13A should be submitted, along with supporting documentation for the dates of the event (e.g. news articles, email, letters, state of emergency declarations).

  6. What address should be used to mail in the Form J-13A to the California Department of Education?

    The Form J-13A should be mailed to the address listed on the Form J-13A Instructions.

  7. Is a governor’s Proclamation of a State of Emergency the same as the Declaration of a State of Emergency?

    Yes, California Education Code Section 46392 uses the term “declaration” whereas the governor’s office uses the term “proclamation”.

  8. If local educational agencies (LEA) close schools or experience a material decrease in attendance after P-2, does the LEA still need to submit a Form J-13A?
    If an emergency event causes a school closure and an LEA does not offer the statutorily required annual number of instructional days or minutes, an approved J-13A request provides authority to maintain school for less than the required instructional days and minutes without incurring a fiscal penalty to the LEA’s Local Control Funding Formula funding. If an LEA experiences a material decrease in attendance due to an emergency event at any time during the school year an approved J-13A request provides the authority to add the average daily attendance (ADA) up to what would be considered normal for the days that ADA was lost due to the event. To the extent the event occurs after the P-2 attendance period cutoff date for the LEA, the LEA would be able to increase their Annual ADA upon receipt of a J-13A approval letter from the California Department of Education.

School Closure
  1. If school is offered but a site has to close early or start instruction late due to an emergency is it considered a closure day?

    Possibly. In order for a day to count as a day of instruction towards meeting the annual instructional day requirement school must be scheduled for at least the minimum instructional day. If reducing the scheduled instructional day results in less than the minimum day being offered, the day would not be considered a day of instruction, and the district would need to submit a J-13A closure request to avoid a fiscal penalty to the local educational agency’s Local Control Funding Formula funding for offering fewer than the required instructional days.

  2. Does a local educational agency (LEA) need to submit a Form J-13A for a school closure if the LEA has additional emergency days built into their school calendar?

    The built-in emergency days should be used for emergency closures when they arise. If additional closures occur after the built-in emergency days have been used, the LEA should submit a J-13A waiver request for approval.

  1. Does a nonpublic, nonsectarian school (NPS) need to submit a Form J-13A for a school closure due to an emergency event?

    School closures at a NPS vary depending on the circumstances. Therefore, the local educational agency should email the California Department of Education (CDE) at attendanceaccounting@cde.ca.gov about the emergency closure at the NPS, and include the site address, date(s) of emergency, and the nature of the emergency event in the email. CDE will provide guidance on how to proceed.

  1. For Part III, Closure History, does a school report only the school closures that had an approved J-13A request?
    No, provide all school closures in the current and prior five fiscal years, regardless if a Form J-13A was submitted to California Department of Education.

Material Decrease
  1. How does a school determine if the decrease of attendance is material?

    California Code of Regulation, Title 5, Section 428: A decrease in the average daily attendance (ADA) for purposes of California Education Code (EC) Section 46392 is material when at least ten percent of the students who would normally attend a school do not attend on any one day.

    To determine if the decrease of attendance is material, compare the attendance on the day of the event to October or May ADA. If attendance on the day of the event is less than 90 percent of October or May ADA, a J-13A may be submitted for attendance credit. Upon approval of the J-13A, the local educational agency will use their October or May ADA in place of actual attendance on the day of the event when ADA is calculated.

    When the Governor declares a state of emergency, the 10 percent requirement does not apply. A Form J-13A may be submitted for any decrease in attendance compared to October or May ADA of the same school year. Include a copy of the declaration with the Form J-13A.

    For purposes of EC 46392, any decrease in attendance at a necessary small school, as defined in EC sections 42280 – 42286, is material.
  2. If a school district has to start school late due to an emergency event and the minimum day requirement is met but a large number of students do not attend can a district submit a material decrease request?

    Yes. If the district offers a day of instruction and an emergency event results in a loss of attendance of at least 10 percent below normal, the district can submit a J-13A material decrease request. In the event that the Governor declares a state of emergency for the event that caused school to start late any loss of average daily attendance below normal attendance levels is considered material and the 10 percent threshold does not need to be met in order to submit the J-13A material decrease request.

  3. When an emergency event causes a loss of attendance to all school sites in the district, does the 10 percent decrease requirement apply to the district as a whole or at each individual site?

    In an emergency event that causes a loss of attendance to all school sites in the district, then the district as a whole will need to meet the 10 percent decrease requirement. Otherwise the district can apply for each school individually, and each site must meet the 10 percent decrease requirement. Calculating each school individually may yield a larger number of days of attendance requested. In either case, each site must be entered separately in Section C, Part II.

  4. What dates should be used to determine “normal attendance”?

    The date range of the school month for October or May should be used to determine normal attendance. The average daily attendance is reported for funding based on school months. Each school month consists of four weeks, five days each. All school months consist of 20 days, begin on a Monday, and end on a Friday.

  5. Should the average daily attendance (ADA) for continuation high school sites be included in the October or May ADA calculation?

    No. Continuation high school sites that suffered a material decrease must be listed separately in Part III of Section C of the Form J-13A, in hours (not ADA), and compared to the same day of the week prior or week following (example: compare a Tuesday to a Tuesday of the week prior or the week following the event date).

  6. What if the October or May school month spans two calendar months?

    October or May average daily attendance (ADA) is the ADA for the school month that has the most days in either October or May. It is not the calendar month of October or May. The month used might span the preceding or following month.

  7. If an emergency occurs in October or May, what alternative school month should be used to determine “normal attendance”?
    Contact the California Department of Education to discuss possible alternative school months that can be used instead of October or May. Send an e-mail to attendanceaccounting@cde.ca.gov.

Affidavit
  1. Does the Form J-13A need to be signed during a regularly scheduled board meeting?

    No. The Form J-13A can be signed by a majority of the board members any time. The signatures need to be witnessed by someone other than a signing board member.

  2. Must all board members sign the affidavit?

    No. A majority of board members are required to sign.

  3. Does the affidavit need to be notarized?

    No. The affidavit does not need to be notarized, but the signatures must be witnessed and the witness sections need to be completed in its entirety.

  4. Who should witness the board members signatures?

    Someone other than a signing board member, who witnessed the signatures of the board members, can witness the board signatures. This may be the district superintendent or another individual who witnessed the signatures.

  5. Does the affidavit require original or copied signatures?

    The affidavit requires original “wet” signatures.

  6. If the charter school is approved by the county office of education, does the County Superintendent of Schools have to sign both Part II and III of Section E of the affidavit?

    No, if the County Superintendent of Schools also serves as the charter authorizer, then he/she can leave Part II blank and complete only Part III.

  7. If a charter school is a direct funded charter school, can the charter submit the Form J-13A directly to the California Department of Education (CDE)?
    No. The superintendent of the charter school authorizer must approve the Form J-13A for all charters, even a direct funded charter. If the charter authorizer is a school district, then the district superintendent will forward the approved request to the county office of education for the county superintendent to review. If the county superintendent approves the request, then the Form J-13A is submitted to the CDE.

Reporting Approvals
  1. When there is a school closure, should the local educational agency (LEA) adjust the divisor immediately or wait for the California Department of Education (CDE) J-13A approval letter?

    An LEA applying on behalf of schools that calculate average daily attendance (ADA) based on days taught (without a fixed divisor) should reduce their divisor (days taught) for any school closure, disregarding whether it was approved or not, because it was not a day of instruction.

    An LEA applying on behalf of schools that calculate ADA using a fixed divisor should reduce their divisor only when the State Superintendent of Public Instruction has approved their school closure. Once the J-13A approval letter has been received, the LEA should reduce their divisor (days taught) by the days approved for closure. After the ADA has been recalculated using the reduced divisor, the LEA should submit a corrected attendance file with the updated numbers to the CDE.

    All LEAs should keep the J-13A approval letter to document the school’s compliance with instructional time laws and authority to maintain school for less than the required annual instructional days and minutes without incurring a fiscal penalty to their Local Control Funding Formula funding.

  2. Does a local educational agency (LEA) have to wait for the California Department of Education (CDE) J-13A approval letter for a material decrease before submitting revised attendance data for the P-1, P-2, or Annual reporting deadline?

    Yes, the LEA will have wait until the approved net increase of apportionment days is received from the CDE. Until the J-13A approval letter has been received, the LEA will submit the actual attendance on the day(s) of the emergency condition.

  3. How does a local educational agency (LEA) apply the approved credit for a J-13A material decrease to the attendance report?

    When the LEA has received the approval, the approved net increase of apportionment days can be added to the total number of days of pupil attendance. Then the revised total number of days of pupil attendance will be divided by the number of calendar days school was taught. After the average daily attendance has been recalculated with the approved net increase amount, the LEA should submit a corrected attendance file with the updated numbers to the California Department of Education using the Principal Apportionment Data Collection Software.

  4. How are material decrease requests for continuation high schools calculated in comparison to regular material decrease requests?

    Material decrease requests for continuation high schools use hours of attendance generated on the same day of the week prior to the emergency event or hours of attendance on the same day of the week subsequent to the emergency event to determine estimated normal attendance hours. Material decrease requests for all schools other than continuation schools use October or May school month average daily attendance to determine normal attendance.

  5. Does it matter how much approved average daily attendance (ADA) goes to each grade span?

    Yes. Each grade span should get an allotted amount based on the percentage that grade span has for total attendance (i.e. if grades TK/K–3 have 20 percent of total students in the school, the ADA should be increased by 20 percent of the approved amount for that grade span).

  6. If an emergency event requires closure of an AM or PM TK/kindergarten class but not both AM and PM TK/kindergarten classes, how would that affect the divisor used in calculating average daily attendance (ADA)?

    On occasion an emergency event affects only a portion of the school day and as a result only the AM or PM TK/kindergarten class(es) is closed for that day. If a district experiences an emergency event that requires partial day closure and as a consequence the AM or PM TK/kindergarten class is not offered the district should file a Form J-13A closure request for the affected TK/K class. Since that TK/K class was not offered, the divisor should be reduced to reflect that instruction was not offered. When calculating ADA the class that was closed will have a lower divisor than the class that was offered instruction on that day.

  7. How does a local educational agency submit a corrected attendance file to the California Department of Education?

    There are specific instructions in the Principal Apportionment Data Collection (PADC) Software User Guide on how to submit a corrected attendance file. Click on the link below and select the appropriate fiscal year to access the PADC Software User Guide: https://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/sf/pa/.

  8. If the charter school received an approved J-13A request for a school closure, what should the charter school report in the days of operation field in the Principal Apportionment Data Collection Software?

    The charter school should always use the actual days of operation for calculating and reporting the average daily attendance. The California Department of Education staff will take into account the approved closure days through the Principal Apportionment process to ensure the charter school attendance is not proportionally reduced. This also applies to charter schools that operate multi-tracks.



 

Questions:   Principal Apportionment Section | attendanceaccounting@cde.ca.gov | 916-324-4541
Last Reviewed: Wednesday, July 18, 2018
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